41 episodes

Medicine for intellectual boredom. Host Dr Mark Fabian of Cambridge University brings together an eclectic mix of creative young folk to discuss the most stimulating ideas at the knowledge frontier, from data governance to the metamodern cultural mode, and everything in between. The world's most thoughtful people, having a chat - and you're invited! So turn off your socials, throw away your popular science books, and get ready for some legit galaxy brain takes. Thanks to Keith Spangle for the spaceship cat avatar https://www.deviantart.com/keithspangle

ePODstemology Mark Fabian

    • Society & Culture

Medicine for intellectual boredom. Host Dr Mark Fabian of Cambridge University brings together an eclectic mix of creative young folk to discuss the most stimulating ideas at the knowledge frontier, from data governance to the metamodern cultural mode, and everything in between. The world's most thoughtful people, having a chat - and you're invited! So turn off your socials, throw away your popular science books, and get ready for some legit galaxy brain takes. Thanks to Keith Spangle for the spaceship cat avatar https://www.deviantart.com/keithspangle

    What's hot in sports science?

    What's hot in sports science?

    James Steele is Associate Professor of Sport and Exercise Science at Solent University. He has extensive research and consultancy experience working with elite athletes across a range of sports, the general population across the lifespan, and both those who are healthy and diseased. He was a member of the Expert Working Group revising the CMO Physical Activity Guidelines for the United Kingdom and is a founding member of both the Strength and Conditioning Society, and the Society for Transparency, Openness, and Replication in Kinesiology. James joins regular host Dr Mark Fabian, assistant professor of public policy at the University of Warwick, to discuss the new hotness in exercise: low-dose workouts, as well as the challenges and peculiarities of conducting research in the sports space. This is the episode for everyone who thinks that maybe all those sports influencers out there aren't being entirely honest with the 'science'. 

    • 58 min
    How to do urban regeneration right

    How to do urban regeneration right

    Regular host Dr Mark Fabian is joined by episode guest Dr Stefania Fiorentino, senior teaching associate in planning, growth, and urban regeneration at Cambridge university’s department of land economy. Dr Fiorentino’s research is at the intersection of urban planning and local economic development, specifically how to innovate with respect to the inclusivity and effectiveness of urban regeneration strategies. Her research is extremely impact-oriented and is typically conducted in partnership with communities, developers, and local government. She has worked especially on coastal towns in the UK, and also has papers on densification strategies, industrial clusters, the geography of innovation, and regional inequalities. The conversation ranges from left behind places to gentrification and strategies for participatory governance.

    Stefania’s webpage and papers:
    https://www.landecon.cam.ac.uk/directory/dr-stefania-fiorentino

    Fiorentino, S., Glasmeier, A. K., Lobao, L., Martin, R., and Tyler, P. (2023) ‘Left behind places’: what are they and why do they matter?, Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, https://doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsad044 
    Fiorentino, S., Sielker, F., and Tomaney, J. (2023) Coastal towns as ‘left-behind places’: economy, environment and planning, Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, https://doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsad045 
    Fiorentino, S. (2023) Public-led shared workspaces and the intangible factors of urban regeneration in UK coastal towns, Urban, Planning and Transport Research, 11(1), DOI: 10.1080/21650020.2023.2260853 
    Fiorentino et al. (2022) The future of the corporate office? Emerging trends in the post-Covid city, Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, 15(3), 597–614, https://doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsac027

    • 56 min
    Culture, Morality, and Economics in Reef Management by Local Communities

    Culture, Morality, and Economics in Reef Management by Local Communities

    Regular host Dr Mark Fabian is joined by Dr Jacqui Lau, senior lecturer and discovery early career fellow (DECRA) at James Cook University in Australia. Jacqui is an environmental scientist employing interdisciplinary perspectives and mixed methods to understand how coastal communities in the pacific islands and Australia respond to climate change and environmental transformations. She has worked collaboratively in the Pacific, East and West Africa to examine ecosystem services, the impact of shocks like COVID-19 on coastal communities, perceptions of fairness about the customary management of coral reefs, and issues of equity (including gender) in conservation and climate change policy. Her work has been published in Nature Climate Change, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and World Development, among other top outlets. 
    Jacqui’s website: https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/jacqueline.lau/ 
    Ostrom, E. (2009). A general framework for analysing the sustainability of social-ecological systems. Nature, 325(5939): 419–422. https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.1172133 
    Ostrom, E. (1990). Governing the commons: The evolution of institutions for collective action. Cambridge University Press. 
    Sayer, A. (2011). Why things matter to people: Social science, values, and ethical life. Cambridge University Press. 
    Graham, J., Haidt, J., Koleva, S., Motyl, M., Iyer, R., Wojcik, S. & Ditto, P. (2013). Moral foundations theory: The pragmatic validity of moral pluralism. Advances in Applied Experimental Philosophy, 47(1): 55–130. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780124072367000024? 
    See also Haidt, J. The Righteous Mind: Why good people are divided on politics and religion. Penguin.
    Shark’s Pacific and Dr Jess Cramp: https://sharkspacific.org/about/  
     

    • 55 min
    Copaganda - How reality TV shows about police affect criminal justice reform

    Copaganda - How reality TV shows about police affect criminal justice reform

    ‘Copaganda’ is the name given to media that seeks to portray the police in a favourable, often distorted light. This includes fictional shows like Law and Order, CSI: Crime Scene Investigations, and Miami Vice, as well as reality-TV style shows that follow policy officers around as they go about their business. Emma Rackstraw’s research investigates how these shows affect the behaviour of the police, perceptions of the police among viewers, and attitudes towards the police in the communities where these shows take place. She joins regular ePODstemology host Dr Mark Fabian from the University of Warwick to discuss the implications of copaganda for criminal justice reform in the United States, the role that researchers play in skewing policy analysis for good or ill, and what changes are most urgently needed in US criminal justice policy.   
    Emma’s website:
    https://www.emmarackstraw.com/home
    Emma’s job market paper: 
    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4592803 
    “The Work” documentary (typically available via Amazon Prime):
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5836866/ 
    Public health approaches to policing: 
    https://www.intensiveengagement.com/uploads/3/2/8/3/3283498/public_health_approaches.pdf 

    • 58 min
    How can we get more action on climate change?

    How can we get more action on climate change?

    Climate change is the biggest existential threat facing humanity. So why aren’t we doing more about it? This week’s guest is Dr Antonio Valentim, a political scientist and postdoctoral fellow at Yale’s MacMillan Centre. His research seeks to answer two main questions 1) when and why do voters change their opinions and behaviours with respect to climate change? and 2) how do political incentives influence political elites’ behaviour on climate change? Who better to help us get some answer on how we can get more action on the climate policy front. If you’re interested in what protesters, citizens, political parties, and researchers can do to advance the climate transition, tune into this episode. 
    Antonio’s website: https://antoniovalentim.github.io/
    Antonio’s paper on Fridays for Future protests: https://osf.io/preprints/socarxiv/m6dpg/ 
    Antonio’s paper on the Green’s not fielding candidates in flood affected areas: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3960045 
    Bolet, D., Green ,F., & Gonzalez-Eguino, M. (2023). How to get coal country to vote for climate policy: The effect of a ‘just transition agreement’ on Spanish election results. Forthcoming in American Political Science Review. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4394195 

    • 1 hr 1 min
    How to achieve democratic consolidation in Africa

    How to achieve democratic consolidation in Africa

    While Kim Jong Un might disagreed, democracy is widely regarded as a universal value – it is a system of political organisation that enshrines the right to self-determination. Recent centuries have seen a wave of democratisation relative to historical trends, with democracies replacing dictatorships and other autocratic forms of governance in nations across the globe. Yet many of these democracies have also struggled to put down strong roots. Backsliding is common and consolidation arduous. A few spots of bad luck and a fledging democracy like Bangladesh or even Hungary can start to look fake. How can we promote the maturation of democracies? Samuel Amin from the University of Warwick joins regular host Dr Mark Fabian to share his insights from his PhD research on Ghana, especially the role of the national peace council there. Samuel emphasises the role of institutions in democratic consolidation, and that many of these institutions will be specific to local contexts rather than universally useful models that can be exported to other countries. The national peace council, for example, makes use of cultural narratives of Ghanaians as peaceful people, and norms of respecting religious and ethnic elders, to facilitate conflict resolution and respect for liberal-democratic institutions like courts and the electoral commission. The episode is optimistic and hopeful, with Samuel concluding with some positive thoughts about the future of democracy in West Africa.
    Samuel’s student page at Warwick: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/pais/people/anim/ 
    Follow Sam on twitter: @animksam
    Nick Cheeseman’s Democracy in Africa: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/democracy-in-africa/3FFB8B40059192D449B77A402ADC82A1 
    Kate Baldwin’s book on traditional African chiefs in democratic africa: https://politicalscience.yale.edu/publications/paradox-traditional-chiefs-democratic-africa   
    Dominique Burbidge’s papers on East African democracy: https://law.strathmore.edu/dr-dominic-burbidge/ 
    Lisa Weeden’s book Peripheral Visions: Publics, Power, and Performance in Yemen: https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo5893513.html 

    • 1 hr 3 min

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