28 episodes

Brought to you by Care.com, Equal Parts is a podcast for working parents who are trying to balance it all while caring for the people they love – including themselves.

Being a working parent is hard. But you do it for the ones you care for, because they’re the ones you care most about. You can never be prepared for everything that is thrown your way – whether at work or at home. But, the Equal Parts podcast will try to make this a little easier for you. We will talk to experts, authors, and parents who will share their insights, advice, and tips on how to navigate parenthood and professionalism – at the same time.

Equal Parts Equal Parts

    • Kids & Family
    • 4.9, 33 Ratings

Brought to you by Care.com, Equal Parts is a podcast for working parents who are trying to balance it all while caring for the people they love – including themselves.

Being a working parent is hard. But you do it for the ones you care for, because they’re the ones you care most about. You can never be prepared for everything that is thrown your way – whether at work or at home. But, the Equal Parts podcast will try to make this a little easier for you. We will talk to experts, authors, and parents who will share their insights, advice, and tips on how to navigate parenthood and professionalism – at the same time.

    Raising confident and ambitious girls

    Raising confident and ambitious girls

    How do we prepare our girls for the future and ensure they have the confidence, skills, and courage to face a difficult world? Dr. Marisa Porges is Head of The Baldwin School, an independent pre-K through 12 all-girls’ school outside of Philadelphia, and she’s the author of a new book, What Girls Need: How to Raise Bold, Courageous, and Resilient Women. Dr. Porges has spent her career practicing what she advocates. She’s served as a senior cybersecurity advisor in the Obama White House, a counterterrorism expert in Afghanistan, and on active duty in the U.S. Navy, flying jets as a Naval Flight Officer. Dr. Porges joins us to talk about the skills girls need to succeed in the 21st century, and how parents and educators can help girls find their inner voice, self-advocate, and be fearless in the face of anything – and anyone – that comes their way.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    -How girls’ innate talents – collaborative problem-solving, communicating across boundaries, empathy, and adaptability – are their biggest competitive advantages
    -What you can do to help girls practice “the art of the ask” and become skilled negotiators
    -Advice for raising sons to be female allies and advocates
    -Why a healthy competitive spirit gives girls an edge
    -Stories from Dr. Porges’s time serving in the Obama White House and flying jets in the U.S. Navy

    • 19 min
    What’s “too much screentime” for kids in the era of COVID-19?

    What’s “too much screentime” for kids in the era of COVID-19?

    Have your kids been clocking some serious screentime these past few months? Pandemic life has loosened screentime rules for families across America, leaving parents – especially those working from home – feeling conflicted. It’s also raised lots of questions. How much screentime should I allow for my kids? What apps are appropriate? If I let my son play three hours of Roblox, will he turn into a techno-zombie? Devorah Heitner, PhD, is here to answer these questions and more. She’s the author of the book, Screenwise: Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World and the founder of Raising Digital Natives. Devorah explains the importance of “mentoring over monitoring” when it comes to kids’ tech use and gives advice on how to encourage a healthy relationship with media and technology – and set kids up for success, not stress, in the digital age.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    -Why it’s critical that we empathize with kids right now and let them use technology to connect, create, laugh, and learn
    -What digital platforms and apps are appropriate (or not) for elementary aged kids, tweens, and teens
    -Is there a “right way” for teens to use TikTok?
    -Why parents need to be “Editors-in-Chief” and understand the basics of their kids’ digital worlds – what they watch, play, and post
    -Why iPhones and video games alone don’t cause depression in kids, but they can “turn up the dial” on mental health issues
    -Tips for teaching kids how to self-regulate their screentime
    -How to empower kids to use technology and digital media for social good

    For more information, visit www.raisingdigitalnatives.com.

    • 21 min
    Talking to kids about race and racism

    Talking to kids about race and racism

    It's not easy talking to kids about subjects that make adults feel uncomfortable – or that adults might not fully understand themselves. But when it comes to race and racism in America, it's imperative that we start listening, learning, and having these conversations with our kids and with each other. Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum is president emerita of Spelman College, an award-winning clinical psychologist, a national authority on racial issues in America, and author of the best-selling book, Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations about Race. In this special episode, Dr. Tatum joins Care.com CEO Tim Allen for a discussion about Talking to Kids About Race and Racism. She offers guidance on how to have important – often difficult – conversations with kids of all ages about race and racism that are empathetic, constructive, and compassionate.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    -The harm we create when we ‘shhh’ our kids’ questions about racial difference
    -How to teach kids how to be actively anti-racist, and ways to discuss racial injustice with children as young as two or three
    -Why you should feel empowered to ask teachers and caregivers questions about how they’re communicating fairness and difference
    -The importance of teaching our kids – and ourselves – how to live in a multicultural, multiracial environment
    -How to answer honestly when kids ask questions about police brutality and protests
    -Dr. Tatum’s “3 F Strategy' (felt, found, feel) to interact with adults who don’t share your views
    -The negative effects of using racial microaggressions
    -Resources to initiate age-appropriate discussions about race with kids, including Social Justice Books and Common Sense Media

    For more information, visit www.beverlydanieltatum.com, or follow Dr. Tatum on Twitter @BDTSpelman

    • 40 min
    Talking to your parents about their finances

    Talking to your parents about their finances

    Most of us would rather have "the sex talk" with our kids than talk to our own parents about their finances. Talking about money can feel awkward, prying, and uncomfortable. But “the money talk” is a conversation every adult needs to have with their parents. And the sooner the better, says Cameron Huddleston. She’s an award-winning journalist with nearly two decades of experience writing about personal finance and author of the book, Mom and Dad, We Need to Talk: How to Have Essential Conversations with Your Parents About Their Finances. Cameron joins us to share advice on how to get the conversation started with your parents, even if they – and your siblings – are reluctant to talk about it. She shares the documents and information you’ll need in order to plan for a future that will keep the headaches and heartaches of estate planning to a minimum.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    -The legal documents that your parents should have in place, including wills, power of attorney, and advance health care directives
    -Why you need to discuss finances and estate planning early, when your parents are of sound body and mind
    -How COVID-19 has changed the way we approach this conversation with our parents
    -Essential information you parents should write down for you – like social security and driver’s license numbers, bank and retirement account information, and more
    -How to involve siblings and step-siblings in having these conversations, especially if one is being difficult or stubborn
    -How to talk to your kids about money so that they grow up feeling comfortable having “the money talk” with you someday

    For more information, visit www.cameronhuddleston.com.

    • 20 min
    Gen X women’s midlife crisis

    Gen X women’s midlife crisis

    Gen X has been dubbed “America’s neglected middle child,” stuck between Baby Boomers and Millennials. But it’s Gen X women who face particular pressures and burdens that are contributing to their own (often overlooked) midlife crisis. They’re caring for young children and aging parents – all while running the household and working full-time. Ada Calhoun, author of the New York Times best-seller, Why We Can’t Sleep: Women’s New Midlife Crisis, says all this has left Gen X women feeling stressed out, overwhelmed, and exhausted. She shares research from her book and what she learned from more than 200 middle-aged women. Ada explains why this generation of women were raised to believe in the fantasy that they could “have it all,” the consequences of unrealistic expectations, and ways Gen X women can find relief and, finally, get a good night’s sleep.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    ●Lessons and stories from Gen X women from around the country
    ●The impact that quarantines and closed schools and daycares is having on Gen X women in the workforce
    ●Why so many Gen X women are experiencing “anticipated loss”
    ●The price middle-aged women pay for taking on the burden of caregiving responsibilities – both for children and aging loved ones
    ●Ways employers can step up and better support middle-aged working moms
    ●The importance of finding a support network and realizing that this phase in life will eventually pass

    For more information, visit www.adacalhoun.com.

    • 13 min
    Ideas for summer camp at home

    Ideas for summer camp at home

    The school year is winding down, and summer is heating up. For millions of kids, that can only mean one thing: summer camp. Except this summer is different. Camps around the country are closed because of Covid-19. Or, some parents just don’t feel comfortable sending their kids this year. But camp doesn’t have to be canceled. You can recreate it at home. Catherine Newman is a mom and author of the kids’ craft book, Stitch Camp, and her latest book, How to Be a Person. She recently published an article in The New York Times with ideas on how parents working from home can create a high-fun, low-stress “home camp” experience for their kids this summer. Catherine joins us to share her creative, fun, and practical advice – everything from teaching kids how to make their own lunch to how they can build the ultimate fort.

    Listen to this episode to learn:
    -How to talk openly with your child about their sense of loss this summer
    -How to get started with building the camp-at-home experience (be sure to invest in plenty of craft supplies!)
    -Why parents should consider teaching kids some basic skills in order have some independent summertime fun (think sewing, cooking, and even cleaning)
    -How to set clear expectations with kids and be transparent around when you can and can’t be available during the work day
    -How much screen time should we allow at "home camp"?
    -Where to find helpful online educational resources for kids that will keep them busy and having fun this summer

    For more information, visit https://www.catherinenewmanwriter.com/.

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
33 Ratings

33 Ratings

BigPoppa99 ,

Helpful!

Loved the episode with Anya. Very helpful!

heatherclimate ,

Great parenting podcast

This podcast has been super helpful to me as I navigate all of the challenges of being a full-time working mom. I’m grateful for the input and insights.

longstick20 ,

Diverse and informative

This is an excellent resource for targeted advice on all things parenting and work/life balance. I love the length! Feeling always pressed for time, this podcast gets to the point, all the while providing critical insights that I can apply immediately. Hello, positive parenting!

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