39 episodes

Amy and Jon talk with educational innovators about creating ethical learning environments, helping students overcome the effects of trauma, and empowering young people to make change. Tune in weekly.

Ethical Schools Ethical Schools

    • Social Sciences

Amy and Jon talk with educational innovators about creating ethical learning environments, helping students overcome the effects of trauma, and empowering young people to make change. Tune in weekly.

    Black and Latinx students, institutional racism, and the carceral continuum

    Black and Latinx students, institutional racism, and the carceral continuum

    Dr. Carla Shedd, associate professor of sociology and urban education at The Graduate Center, CUNY, studies the interactions with institutions of low-income Black and Latinx students and how institutional racism impacts children from even before birth. Children who attend integrated schools have sharper awareness of inequities than their counterparts in segregated schools and communities. The “carceral continuum” is more comprehensive than the “school to prison pipeline” and comprises all encounters with institutions. Carla also talks about professionals’ ethical responsibilities and responses and how to create safe spaces.
     
    *Overview and transcript below. 








































































































    References




    Unequal City is the award-winning book by Carla Shedd on how Chicago schools shape the perceptions and experiences of its students.























    Overview
















    00:00-00:55 Intro
    00:56-03:22 Carceral continuum—description and why this is more inclusive and accurate than “school to prison pipeline.”
    03:23-04:44 Interrupting and disrupting the carceral continuum
    04:45-06:53 Experience on a retrospective homicide review committee
    06:54-10:31 Ethical implications for professionals
    10:32-15:45 Schools and teachers that have created safe spaces; description of Piney Woods School
    15:46-17:51 Keeping a school successful over generations
    17:52-19:34 Private schools as potential models for public schools
    19:35-23:08 Students’ perceptions of injustice
    23:09-28:47 How students respond to perceptions of injustice
    28:48-32:53 Perceptions of injustice and student activism; The Beacon School in NYC
    32:54-35:19 The interrelationships of schools and communities
    35:20-37:07 The education continuum; providing resources before students get in trouble rather than only afterward
    37:08-end Outro























    Transcription
















    Jon M: 00:10 Hi, I’m Jon Moscow.
    Amy H-L: 00:16 And I’m Amy Halpern-Laff. Welcome to Ethical Schools. Our guest today is Dr. Carla Shedd, associate professor of sociology and urban education at The Graduate Center, CUNY. Carla is the author of “Unequal City: Race, Schools and Perceptions of Injustice,” which was recently included in the Zora Canon, a list of the hundred greatest books by African American women. Her current research centers on New York city’s juvenile justice system and the institutional experiences of young people of color. Welcome Carla and congratulations on the recognition by Zora.
    Carla S: 00:52 Thank you so much for having me.
    Amy H-L: 00:56 Carla, you often speak about the carceral continuum. What is the carceral continuum and how does it differ from the school to prison pipeline, which is a term I suspect our listeners are more familiar with.
    Carla S: 01:10 Thank you for that question. I call myself a scholar of the carceral continuum because it allows for some precision to think about the steps and the trajectories that young people take as we think about their paths toward or away from prison. And it’s not as,

    • 38 min
    Parent-school relationships in early childhood programs: family engagement is driven by families

    Parent-school relationships in early childhood programs: family engagement is driven by families

    Yasmin Morales-Alexander of Lehman College dispels the myth that Latinx parents don’t engage in their children’s education. Genuine parent-school engagement is based on schools’ recognition of families’ cultural values and traditions. “Family engagement is a cultural practice.” *Overview and transcript below.
































































































































    Photo by OC Gonzalez
















    Overview
















    00:00-00:49 Intro
    00:52-06:51 Mexican immigrant parents’ engagement with their children’s education 
    06:52-10:41 Family engagement as a cultural practice
    10:42-13:02 Cultural tension between home and school; how children create bicultural frameworks
    13:03-15:17 Ethical school-family relationships
    15:18-20:11 Structuring schools for family engagement
    20:12-22:18 Cultural congruence and cultural competence
    22:19-25:44 How teacher education programs can better prepare teachers for parent and community engagement
    25:45-27:06 Including family engagement across teacher education methods courses
    27:07-31:06 Authenticity in building relationships
    31:07-33:42 Reconceptualizing school communities around family engagement
    33:43-35:41 Negotiating multiple cultures in the school community
    35:22-36:20 Supporting teachers in understanding themselves and thinking about themselves in the context of other people
    36:21-end Outro



































    Transcription
















    Amy H-L: 00:15 Hi, I’m Amy Halpern-Laff.
    Jon M: 00:17 And I’m Jon Moscow. Welcome to Ethical Schools.
    Amy H-L: 00:20 Our guest today is Dr. Yasmin Morales-Alexander. Yasmin is an assistant professor in the Early Childhood graduate program at Lehman College. She was the inaugural recipient of Teacher’s College’s Shirley Chisholm Dissertation Award, recognizing TC doctoral graduates who have advanced the aims of democracy by promoting racial and gender equality, and is also a recipient of the Lehman College Urban Transformative Education Award. Welcome, Yasmin.
    Yasmin M-A: 00:49 Thank you. It’s good to be here.
    Jon M: 00:52 Your work has focused a lot on Latinx parents engagement with early childhood programs and dispelling myths that Latinx parents don’t value their children’s education. In your doctoral dissertation on Mexican parents with children in a New York City Head Start program, you found that the parents were wholly engaged in their children’s development and education and helped them primarily by communicating knowledge rooted in Mexican culture. How did the parents do that?
    Yasmin M-A: 01:22 Well, my simplest answer is they did it being themselves and just being true to who they are and and really relying on their own experiences, their own experiences growing up in Mexico and various states of Mexico immigrating to this country and then subsequently having their children in this country and really kind of bridging those two worlds.
    Jon M: 01:56 Can you talk, I mean, would ther

    • 39 min
    The Algebra Project: Math Literacy and Empowerment – Part 1

    The Algebra Project: Math Literacy and Empowerment – Part 1

    Kate Belin teaches math at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School, a progressive public school in the Bronx, where she implements the Algebra Project, an initiative that connects math to students’ lived experiences. We talk about the synergy between the Algebra Project and Fannie Lou, both of which have their roots in the history of the civil rights movement.
    *Overview and transcript below. 




















































































































    Image: Washington Post











    References
    Kate refers to these resources:


    Book “Radical Equations: Civil Rights from Mississipi to the Algebra Project” by Robert Moses and Charles E. Cobb
    Book “Experiencing Geometry: Euclidean and Non-Euclidean with History” by David Henderson and Daina Taimina
    Book “Pounding the Rock: Basketball Dreams and Real Life in a Bronx High School” by Marc Skelton
    Documentary “Freedom Summer” by Stanley Nelson Jr. 
    Program Math for America

    And Jon makes a reference to the book “The Making Of Black Revolutionaries” by James Forman. 























    Overview
















    00:00-00:53 Introductions
    00:54-04:59 Description of Algebra Project
    05:00-10:31 Why Kate Belin became a math teacher and became involved with the Algebra Project
    10:32-16:01 Background: Fannie Lou Hamer, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, 1964 Democratic Convention
    16:02-20:09 Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom H.S. vision
    20:10-22:45 Implementing the Algebra Project at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom H.S.
    22:46-30:55 Ethics and math
    30:56-35:22 Math, ethics, and civic education
    35:23-end Outro























    Transcription of the episode
















    Speaker 1: 00:09 Hi. I’m Jon Moscow.
    Amy H-L: 00:16 And I’m Amy Halpern-Laff. Welcome to Ethical Schools, where we discuss strategies for creating inclusive and equitable schools and youth programs that help students to develop commitment and capacity to build ethical institutions.
    Jon M: 00:32 Our guest today is Kate Belin. Kate is in her 15th year of teaching math at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom School, a progressive public high school in the Bronx, and a teacher trainer for the Algebra Project. Kate has also served as adjunct professor at Bard and CUNY and is a United Federation of Teachers (UFT) chapter leader. Welcome Kate.
    Kate B: 00:53 Thank you. It’s wonderful to be here.
    Amy H-L: 00:54 Kate, we’re especially interested in your experience with the Algebra Project. Would you tell us a bit about the Algebra Project, its history and objectives?
    Kate B: 01:04 So the Algebra Project is a national mathematics literacy effort. It uses mathematics literacy as an organizing tool to guarantee quality public school education for all children in the United States. The Algebra Project has developed curriculum materials, trained teachers and teacher trainers, and provided ongoing professional development support and community involvement activities to schools seeking to achieve a systematic change in mathematics education. So t

    • 37 min
    NYC schools: still separate and unequal

    NYC schools: still separate and unequal

    Student activists Coco Rhum and Hebh Jamal describe what real integration of NYC schools would look like and how to achieve it. Bringing sharp analysis and insight from their experiences as leaders in IntegrateNYC and Teens Take Charge, they were interviewed by Lev Moscow on our sister podcast, acorrectionpodcast.com.
    *Overview and transcript below. 




















































































































    Image: Integrate NYC Facebook page




























    Overview
















    0:00-2:27 Episode intro and intro of Coco Rhum
    2:28-6:21 Critique of Mayor de Blasio’s and Chancellor Carranza’s integration policies
    6:22-6:41 Key integration initiatives—removing school screens
    6:42-11:13 Screening, school choice, race and class
    11:14-13:05 Funding, Parents Association contributions
    13:06-16:38 Ed opt programs, mixed academic levels within classrooms
    16:39-20:25 Impact of inequalities in the larger society; community schools
    20:26-22:40 Intro of Hebh Jamal
    22:41-25:45 Becoming involved in IntegrateNYC
    25:46-28:37 IntegrateNYC’s 5 R’s: Race and Enrollment; Resource Allocation; Relationships; Representation; Restorative Justice
    28:38-29:41 Integration in Community  School District 15 (Brooklyn)
    29:42-33:30 Racism and breaking racial barriers down
    33:31-end Being Palestinian, commonality of “othering” in Mideast and NYC























    Transcription of the episode
















    Jon M: 00:00 Hi, I’m Jon Moscow. Welcome to Ethical Schools, where we discuss strategies for creating inclusive and equitable schools and youth programs that help students to develop both commitment and capacity to build ethical institutions. We’re delighted today to post an interview from our sister podcast, acorrectionpodcast.com hosted by Lev Moscow. Lev talks with two student activists, Coco Rhum and Hebh Jamal, about campaigns to integrate the New York City school system. We think you’ll enjoy it. And to make it easier to use audio clips from our podcasts as jumping off points in classes and workshops, we’re now providing transcripts and overviews on our website, ethicalschools.org. Good listening and Happy New Year.
    Lev M: 01:11 So we have a very exciting show today. We’ve got two guests. I think this is the first time that we’ve done this before. Our first guest is Coco Rhum and the second guest is Hebh Jamal. I think you will all enjoy the show very much today. So Coco, let me do this. Let me just, let me introduce you to the audience and we can get started now. Does that sound good?
    Coco R: 01:36 Yeah, that’s great.
    Lev M: 01:36 We are here with Coco Rhum, who is a college freshman at Williams and has been working around integration, school integration, in New York City since at least you were a sophomore, is that right, Coco?
    Coco R: 01:51 Yeah, actually like late 2016.
    Lev M: 01:54 You were a policy leader for Integrate New York City and Teens Take Charge. Do you want to add anything?
    Coco R: 02:00 So through Teens Take Charge, I

    • 35 min
    Advice for Secondary School Teachers

    Advice for Secondary School Teachers

    This is an encore. We interview Lev Moscow who, for the last 14 years, has taught history and economics at The Beacon School in New York City. Lev reflects that advisory, done well, can serve as a venue for students to explore questions of ethics, purpose and happiness. He talks about balancing the history curriculum to include non-European perspectives. Getting students to read more than a few sentences is perhaps today’s teachers’ greatest challenge and Lev explains his approach.
    Lev refers to John Dewey, Tony Judt, and these resources:


    Book “Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials” by Malcolm Harris;
    Book “The End of Education: Redefining the Value of School” by Neil Postman.

    *Overview and transcript below. 










































































































































     Lev also hosts a podcast that aims to make economics accessible. It is called A Correction Podcast and you can listen to it on acorrectionpodcast.com.























    Overview




    00:00-01:38 Intros01:39-08:05 Advisories08:06-11:28 Electronic technology in classrooms11:29-12:41 Relationships in advisories12:42-18:14 Technology as changing the ecology of a situation; getting students to read deeply in a technological age18:15-19:56 Students’ experiences in college as compared to high school19:57-22:12 Homework: overwork, stress and teen suicides; two school systems– high pressure and low pressure 22:13-24:44 Homework and writing projects: historiographies/argumentative essays; 24:45-28:39 Nightly homework and deep questions: SRQ (summarize, respond/reflect; question); differentiating between superficial and quality questions28:40-36:18 Ethics and morality36:19-40:55 Decentering Europe in teaching history40:56 Outro























    Transcription of the episode
















    Jon M: 00:00 I’m Jon Moscow. This is a reposting of an interview with Lev Moscow who has taught history and economics at The Beacon School in New York City for 14 years. Lev offers advice for secondary school teachers on topics such as advisory, including non-European perspectives in the history curriculum, and getting students to read more than a few sentences. To make clips from our episodes easier to use in teacher education classes and professional development presentations, we’ve started to provide transcripts and overviews on our website, ethicalschools.org. We hope you enjoy this episode and wish you a good break, if you have one, and a Happy New Year.
    Jon M: 00:56 Hi, I’m Jon Moscow.
    Amy H-L: 00:57 And I’m Amy Halpern-Laff. Welcome to Ethical Schools, where we discuss strategies for creating inclusive, and equitable schools and youth programs that help students to develop both commitment and capacity to develop ethical institutions.
    Jon M: 01:12 Our guest today is Lev Moscow. Lev teaches history and economics at The Beacon School, a public high school in New York City, where he’s taught for 14 years. He is the host of

    • 41 min
    Multicultural Education: Challenges and Aspirations

    Multicultural Education: Challenges and Aspirations

    We speak with New York State Regent Luis O. Reyes on the evolution of multilingual education in New York, beginning with the ASPIRA Consent Decree that in 1974 established bilingual education as an entitlement for Puerto Rican and other Latinx students. NY is gradually transitioning to bicultural and bi-literate education. The Regents’ Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education Framework represents the way forward.
    *Overview and transcript below. 



















































































































































    Image: hostos.cuny.edu 
















    Overview




    00:00-01:04 Intro
    1:06-04:09 Relevance of John Dewey, Paolo Freire, Eugenio Maria de Hostos
    5:00-26:37 ASPIRA Consent Decree 45 years later
    26:38-37:10 Regents’ “Social Emotional Learning: Essential for Learning, Essential for Life”; culturally responsive-sustaining education
    37:11-41:35 Resources and resource needs for implementing Regents’ Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education Framework
    41:36-48:56 Recruiting and supporting Latinx and other culturally-competent teachers; creating teacher-development pipelines; increasing early childhood teacher salaries
    48:57-52:57 Need for more state funding; Campaign for Fiscal Equity decision; equitable access to funds for all schools











    Transcription of the episode
















    Amy H-L: 00:15 Hi, I’m Amy Halpern-Laff. 
    Jon M: 00:17 And I’m Jon Moscow. Welcome to ethical schools, where we discuss strategies creating inclusive and equitable schools and youth programs that help students to develop both commitment and capacity to build ethical institutions. 
    Amy H-L: 00:33 Our guest today is Dr. Luis O. Reyes. Dr. Reyes is member of the New York state Board of Regents, the body that oversees all educational activities in the state, including the New York State Education Department. Regent Reyes is the Director of Education at the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College. He was a member of the New York city Board of Education from 1990 through 1998 and has been an educator for more than 48 years. Welcome Luis. 
    Luis R: 01:04 Thank you. Amy. 
    Jon M: 01:06 John Dewey wrote about schools modeling democracy and preparing students for democratic citizenship. You have talked about the influence on your work of Eugenio María de Hostos and Paolo Freire, who talked about education in the context of liberation. What’s the relevance of these perspectives for schools today? 
    Luis R: 01:25 I think the relevance of John Dewey and Paulo Freire and Eugenio María de Hostos is that these were all men who were educators, leaders of movements to ensure that education was not just about rote memory or about testing, but education in pursuit of living in a democratic society and living a fully participating, using one’s mind, one’s will and one’s understanding of the social realities of our times to ensure that education becomes an instrument, not of dictating to people who they are, what they know or what they must do, but giving them

    • 54 min

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