97 episodes

If you've ever wanted to have a conversation about race but were afraid of saying the wrong thing, or not being heard or trivialized, this podcast is for you.

Everyday Conversations on Race is a cross-race conversation on race. It brings people together across differences for open comfortable conversations about race in a casual setting.

This is crucial for organizations and businesses that want to build cultures of inclusion that support diversity, equity and innovation.

It's essential in our global society that we learn how to build relationships and work effectively with people from any group, across any difference.

We have guests from different backgrounds, race, age, gender, sexual orientation, etc., senior executives, ex-felons, musicians, educators and just every day people. The show is insightful, enlightening and entertaining.

Our mission is to disrupt the way race is talked about, break racial silos and have a global impact on how people interact with each other.

Let's break through fear of difference, and build connections together.

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People simma Lieberman

    • News
    • 5.0 • 24 Ratings

If you've ever wanted to have a conversation about race but were afraid of saying the wrong thing, or not being heard or trivialized, this podcast is for you.

Everyday Conversations on Race is a cross-race conversation on race. It brings people together across differences for open comfortable conversations about race in a casual setting.

This is crucial for organizations and businesses that want to build cultures of inclusion that support diversity, equity and innovation.

It's essential in our global society that we learn how to build relationships and work effectively with people from any group, across any difference.

We have guests from different backgrounds, race, age, gender, sexual orientation, etc., senior executives, ex-felons, musicians, educators and just every day people. The show is insightful, enlightening and entertaining.

Our mission is to disrupt the way race is talked about, break racial silos and have a global impact on how people interact with each other.

Let's break through fear of difference, and build connections together.

    Conversation on Race with Marcus Sawyerr

    Conversation on Race with Marcus Sawyerr

    Marcus Sawyerr, CEO of EQ Community joins me in this conversation on race. We talk about how he and EQ Community help Black and other People of Color who have been historically excluded from professional opportunities.
    He shares his experience as a Black man in the UK, and  how he came to the US and founded EQ Community.
     
    Key Topics include:
     
    [4:16] Why it’s important for Black people to have access to business opportunities, and ways to get those opportunities.
    [5:14] Why access to information is crucial, and how lack of access has resulted in exclusion for Black and other people of color.
    [12:07]- Why and how he founded EQ Community.
    How Marcus Sawyerr and EQ Community help People of Color get access to top jobs and opportunities instead of languishing in search firms
    [14:00] How people in EQ Community get and give support to each other to excel
    [15:39] Why and how Black and Brown people are underutilized even after they get hired
    [16:38] Is exclusion a Black and White thing, is it an organizational DNA thing? A race thing?
    [23:10] How Diversity and Inclusion is a superpower
    [27:01] The difference between being a black man in the UK vs being a Black man in the US.
    [30:22] How the system in the US is set up for People of Color not to win and how to change that.
     
    Guest Bio
    British-born CEO Marcus Sawyerr is founder of EQ Community, was an executive board member to Microsoft, former Head of Global Partnerships at The Adecco Group in Switzerland, and Senior Director at CareerBuilder. 
    His latest tech platform is a unique online community that’s cultivating and connecting multicultural professionals interested in tech— accelerating diverse and inclusive executive recruitment, globally.
    He can speak to timely topics, as:
    -Hiring Trends across Tech in DE&I Metaverse 
    -How Web3 and decentralization will impact future of work
    -DEI program best practices for a winning team
    - Myth-busting the big lie about “lowering the bar“ to attain inclusive hiring and diverse workforce
    - The power and impact of inclusion and equitable recruiting
    - The importance of developing nuanced and strategic approach to implementing diverse hiring panels
    - And how to structure, implement, measure, and sustain equitable and inclusive attraction and selection practices
    Lastly, Marcus is featured in publications: Insight, The EQ Report, American Express, Recruiter.com, LinkedIn, and Inside Big Data.
    Host Bio:
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

    • 54 min
    Is It Racist To Ask About Caste?

    Is It Racist To Ask About Caste?

    Suhag Shukla joins me in this conversation on race to answer the question, “Is it racist to talk about race?” Suhag is the executive director of the Hindu American Foundation. She's also on the Homeland Security, faith-based security and communications Foundation. And she's a leading voice for civil and human rights and religious freedom.
     
    Key topics:
     
    [1.45] How she grew up straddling both a Hindu identity and an American identity and realizing that the core teachings of Hinduism and being an American fit together.
     
    [5:11] The so-called “founding fathers” who didn’t consider Black and Native American people full human beings.
     
     
    [5:46] First experience with racism during the oil crisis in the 1970s and being "othered."
     
    [7:51] Is caste and/or asking about caste racist? The history of caste and Indian society as well as the British and Portuguese in India.
     
    [10:51] Social Identities, castes, and religious traditions
     
    [12:11] Commonalities in communities and castes in India
    How people in India identify today beyond caste, who has social capital based on class
     
    [15:11] Myths of caste and the fluidity of castes and engagement across different group
     
    The complexity of Indian society, and the assumptions that people outside of India make about people in India
     
    American society tries to simplify economic and social societies in India without any real understanding
     
    [25.48]  US school textbooks teach about other cultures and countries like they are stuck in time, and not what’s happening now
     
    People in the US don’t understand Indian culture today and even asked Suhag if she has electricity in India if her parents arranged her marriage while she was in elementary school
     
    Being assigned a caste by a reporter in a recent interview based on her last name and how she confronted the reporter
     
    Preconceived notions about her. because of her Indian heritage and culture and asking racist questions
     
    [33:13]  The recent survey by the Carnegie Endowment for peace, conducted one of the first-ever comprehensive surveys done of Indian Americans and Indian American attitudes
    shows that with each subsequent generation, there's less and less affinity towards identifying by caste. And  when it comes to discrimination, close to 50% of the people responding out of 1000 people in the survey reported having faced discrimination in the year previously
     
    [39:55] Institutionalizing of caste at Brandeis, Harvard, CSU and other universities. Suhag’s view of why it is racist to ask about caste and include it in a protected category- that it has never been an issue in education
     
    Guest Bio
    Suhag Shukla, Esq., Executive Director, is a co-founder of HAF. She holds a BA in Religion and JD from the University of Florida. Ms. Shukla has helped steer the Foundation to being recognized as a leading voice for civil rights, human rights, and religious freedom. She’s been instrumental in the development of a broad range of educational materials and position papers and blogs for a variety of platforms. Ms. Shukla has served on the Boards of the Nirvana Center, Main Line Indian Association, and YWCA of Minneapolis. She was also a member of the Department of Homeland Security Faith-Based Security and Communications Subcommittee. Ms. Shukla is actively involved with Chinmaya Mission, serves on the board of the Bhutanese American Organization of Philadelphia, and is a thought partner for the Interfaith Center of Greater Philadelphia’s Paths to Understanding Public Art Initiative. Shukla is a member of the board for the National Museum of American Religion and serves on religious advisory committees for the Council on Foreign Relations, the Humane Society of the United States, and the Department of Homeland Security’s Subcommittee for the Prevention of Targeted Violence Against Faith-Based Communities and is a member of the First Amendment Center’s Committee o

    • 55 min
    Racism and Segregation in the Music Industry

    Racism and Segregation in the Music Industry

    Michael Motta, is a former executive in the record business. He was instrumental in breaking open the careers of musicians like Snoop Dogg, Beastie Boys, Megadeath and Bonnie Raitt.
    After years in the business, he realized it was treacherous to his health and left after achieving major success. He also saw the systemic racism and inequality of music airtime, radio station resources. Listen to his story in this conversation on race.
    Today he is the regional manager of Mayweather Boxing and Fitness in Los Angeles, CA, USA.
    Michael considers himself a “a man for all nations.” He is African, Sicilian, Cuban, and Jewish. Raised in the Bronx by four strong Black women, he  learned to be a strong Black man.
    Key topics:
    [5:00] How he was bullied by different groups because of his skin color, not being white enough for the white kids and not dark enough for the Black kids.
    [7:12] Incredibly, Michael just two years ago that he is fifty-one percent Jewish. Hear how he found his Jewish father and a sister he didn’t know he had. However before finding that out, he always had connections to Jewish people, and his son’s mother is Jewish.

    [16:12] What made him finally decide to leave the music industry-
    Motta breaks down the systemic racism of the music industry and the segregation of the radio stations.
    [20:53] We talk some of our favorite genres of music along with artists we love
    [29:06]
    • White kids who listen to hip-hop but don’t care about the politics, and still act racist towards people of color.They spend money on the music but don’t understand history or the message.
    • Where to find conscious rap and hip-hop since it’s not played on commercial radio or given airplay

    [34:50] • His experience in college at a mostly Jewish school
    [38:55] • What it’s like being Black with light skin. How he wasn’t accepted in different places and what he did to survive.
    [40:44] Race and racism and how it’s about fear
    [41:37] Why he’s bothered by gentrification and it’s impact on non-white communities.
    [45:35] Solutions and suggestions to end racism and actions we can all take
    Guest Bio
    A 20-year industry veteran, Michael hails from the Bronx and is of Black, Hispanic and Caucasian heritage.  He earned a scholarship to Brandeis where he played varsity basketball and then went on to earn an MBA at Boston College.  Mike is an accomplished martial artist, boxer and strength and conditioning coach – as well as an expert on nutrition counseling and healthy living -- all skills he attributes to his ability to combat stage four prostate cancer.  Prior to his fitness career Mike was an accomplished record industry executive and was head of promotion and marketing for four record labels, executive vice president for several film companies and is an accomplished screen writer.  He’s the proud father of one son, Nick.

    Host Bio
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

    • 53 min
    Living Diversity Across Race and Culture

    Living Diversity Across Race and Culture

    Michael Dismuke and Lorenzo Jones from Eden Housing, join me in this conversation on race.
    Listen in for practical advice, and best practices for engaging in successful cross-race conversations as they share their experiences. Eden Housing is an organization that develops, manages, and maintains affordable housing throughout California.
     
    With a multi-racial and multi-cultural employee base, they have been able to ensure that their multi-racial, and multi-cultural residents feel included, respected and heard. When you have people living or working together from diverse backgrounds, unless people are able to interact with each other in meaningful ways, there can be tensions, bias and silos. Hear how Eden Housing is able to bring people together across race to thrive together.
    Discover why meaningful interactions, and sharing personal stories can stop racial and other kinds of bias. Learn why leaders need to start with themselves in the conversation about race, by reflecting on their own experiences, their own bias, and why they think and act the way they do. They need to live their values if they say they value diversity and racial equity. Racial equity doesn’t happen by itself. It takes the whole organization to work together.  In this conversation on race, Michael Dismuke and Lorenzo Jones offer concrete suggestions and solutions to talk about race, and how to live diversity, equity and inclusion.
    Key topics:
    [2:53] How Michael Dismuke and Lorenzo Jones credit their own interracial, multicultural backgrounds as contributors to their success as leaders at Eden Housing.
    [4:52] Creating comfortable environments to talk about race and have “curious conversations”.
    [9:29] Having conversations across race and finding connections.
    [14:30] The importance of going beyond racial optics in organization. You have to live inclusion and diversity to be successful.
    [16:00] Creating a diversity council that is diverse.
    [20:33] Best practices for inclusion during holiday seasons.
    [26:33] How to make people from diverse religious faiths and observances feel included, while not favoring any one group.
    [31:49] Gamifying cross-race conversations, and sharing stories across race and culture.
    [39.31] Recognition, and showing respect for indigenous people and their history on the land.
    [45:28] The problem of mixing religion, politics and organizational policies.
    Guests Bio:
    LORENZO JONES
    SENIOR DIRECTOR OF DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION
    As Senior Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Lorenzo is responsible for crafting a comprehensive DEI strategy for the organization, defining goals, and providing a roadmap to ensure that Eden Housing embeds a commitment to racial, social, and economic justice in all its work. He facilitates and creates linkages among Eden’s DEI Council, working groups and committees, and evaluates Eden’s internal processes and practices with an equity lens.
     
    MICHAEL DISMUKE
    VICE PRESIDENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS
    As Vice President of Organizational Development and Internal Communications, Michael is a key member of the Human Resources and Extended Leadership Teams (ELT) at Eden Housing. He is the communications advisor to the company’s executive team and senior leaders across the company. He creates and executes strategies to ensure the company’s human capital has the training and resources they need to support the growth of the organization.
    Host Bio
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

    • 58 min
    A Journey Through Race, Identity and True belonging. How Michael Fosberg discovered his Black identity

    A Journey Through Race, Identity and True belonging. How Michael Fosberg discovered his Black identity

    In this conversation on race, I’m joined by Michael Fosberg. Michael is a writer, actor and activist on issues of race. He is also a Black man who didn’t know he was Black until he was in his mid-thirties when his Armenian mother and white Swedish step-father got divorced. That’s when he went on his journey to find his biological father. Until then, Michael thought he was white.
    Listen to this fascinating conversation and hear the story of Michael Fosberg.
    Key topics:
    [6:27] How he found his father and then found out his biological father was Black.
    [15:31] Growing up in a diverse area and thinking he was one of two white people on the basketball team.
    [17:13] Why Michael’s mother didn’t tell him he was Black.
    [20:27] His lifelong connection to Black people and African-American culture and sudden understanding of why he had that connection.
    [31:21] What it’s like for him, knowing he is Black but growing up with white privilege and how his skin color still gives him that privilege.
    [41:35] Responding to people who say they are colorblind.
    [46:28] Michael Fosberg answers the question of what to do about racism.
    Guest Bio
    Chicago native Michael Fosberg has been working to create a national dialogue on race and identity since 2001 when he launched his one-man autobiographical play Incognito. The author-activist has used the unique presentation, along with engaging interactive training sessions and speeches, to embrace diversity in an effort to change corporate and organization cultures.
    He has been a frequent guest in the national media speaking as an expert on race and identity issues. His travels have taken him across the country facilitating meaningful conversations at educational institutions, corporations, government agencies and military bases. His highly praised memoir; Incognito: An American Odyssey of Race and Self Discovery was published in 2011 and his newest book, Nobody Wants to Talk About It: Race, Identity, and the Difficulty in Forging Meaningful Conversations addresses his efforts to provoke conversations about race over the past fifteen years.
    Contact info: info@incognitotheplay.com
     
    Host Bio
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

    • 55 min
    How Women of Color Heal Racial Trauma With Deepa Purushothaman

    How Women of Color Heal Racial Trauma With Deepa Purushothaman

    Deepa Purushothaman joins me in this conversation on race to talk about the racism, isolation, and trauma many women of color experience in corporate America.
    What is it like for a woman of color to get promoted up to the executive suite and still have to deal with microaggressions, blatant racism, and trivialization? What is it like to be the only person of color in your school and to hear people say how much they hate you? What is it like as a woman of color to constantly have to prove your accomplishments while white people are never questioned?
    Hear the answers to these questions in this episode with Deepa Purushotaman as she shares her experiences and those of other women of color in the workforce.
    Key Topics:
    [2:30] Growing up as the only Indian-American in her school in an almost all-white town.
    [4:35] First experience with racism and speaking out at the age of eight
    [7:30] The trauma of racism and its effect on physical and mental health.
    [10:29] The importance of women of color getting together, sharing their experiences, and helping to heal each other.
    [13:14] Letting go of feeling responsible for your “whole group” or race.
    [16:22] Coming to terms with burnout from microaggressions, trying to fit in, and feeling alone. How Deepa began organizing dinners with other senior women of color across the country to heal together.
    [31:00] How to practice scenarios as an ally, and speak up as a woman of color. Know what to say and take care of yourself and be able to express pain. How not to feel responsible for other people’s reactions.
    [41:27] Address systems and structures that have never included women of color.
    [44:51] How losing everything and having to go on public assistance was a turning point for Deepa Purushothaman and intensified her consciousness and empathy.
    [48:08] Issues of colorism and why some Asian women are uncomfortable talking to Black women about race.
    [51:52] While there are differences amongst women of color, there are also similarities that need to be addressed together. 
     
    Deepa Purushothaman Bio
    Many women of color have scars from climbing the corporate ladder. Sixty percent of WOC feel their companies are not properly prepared to handle racist incidents in the workplace – it’s time to eliminate those incidents by creating unbiased and accountable corporate cultures.
    As the first Indian woman to become a partner at Deloitte, Deepa Purushothaman experienced isolation and burnout firsthand. And then came the overt workplace harassment. Her new book, THE FIRST, THE FEW, THE ONLY: How Women of Color Can Redefine Power in Corporate America (March 1, 2022, Harper Business), lays the groundwork for how other women of color can redefine success on their own terms. It's the book she says she needed when launching her own career.
    Contact Info:
    https://www.deepapuru.com
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/deepapuru
     
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) https://inclusioncoalition.info

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
24 Ratings

24 Ratings

Bicoastal Fashionista ,

Fabulous show

This podcast is so wonderful. Simma has a great gift for becoming a true affirmer of each guest, so that hard topics are made available, defenses are down, doors of understanding are opened and a way for true conversation to take place is modeled. You will learn about so much cool stuff too!
Simma also facilitates conversations in the workplace to create doors where walls exist, and I can only imagine these are life changing for the corporate culture. Really...do yourself a favor and tune in,

Logo17 ,

Amazing SHOW

I love the tactical, honest and real rawness Simma delivers in this podcast. I hit subscribe and definitely can’t wait for the next show!!!

Tom Antion ,

Finally No Screaming

I'm thrilled to be able to listen to a podcast on this sensitive topic where people are actually discussing and debating without screaming at each other. Great work Simma!