86 episodes

Hosted by Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan, fiction/non/fiction interprets current events through the lens of literature, and features conversations with writers of all stripes, from novelists and poets to journalists and essayists.

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    • 5.0 • 61 Ratings

Hosted by Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan, fiction/non/fiction interprets current events through the lens of literature, and features conversations with writers of all stripes, from novelists and poets to journalists and essayists.

    Disability in America: Molly McCully Brown and Rebekah Taussig On Living and Writing Thirty Years After the Americans with Disabilities Act

    Disability in America: Molly McCully Brown and Rebekah Taussig On Living and Writing Thirty Years After the Americans with Disabilities Act

    In this week’s episode of Fiction/Non/Fiction, co-hosts Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan mark the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act by talking to two writers who have made important contributions to the way we talk about disability in America. First, poet and essayist Molly McCully Brown discusses her new essay collection Places I’ve Taken my Body, and reflects on the threat a global pandemic poses to populations who are already seen by society as less valuable. Then Rebekah Taussig talks about her memoir Sitting Pretty, as well as pervasive and tired ableist tropes in films and literature.
    To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. And check out video excerpts from our interviews at LitHub’s Virtual Book Channel and Fiction/Non/Fiction’s YouTube Channel.
    This episode was produced by Mary Henn, Emily Standlee, and Andrea Tudhope.
    Selected readings:
    Molly McCully Brown

    Places I’ve Taken my Body

    The Virginia State Colony For Epileptics and Feebleminded

    In The Field Between Us

    On Books and Their Harbors


    Rebekah Taussig

    Sitting Pretty: The View from My Ordinary Resilient Disabled Body


    “I've Been Paralyzed Since I Was 3. Here's Why Kindness Toward Disabled People Is More Complicated Than You Think,” Time


    “I Called Mine Beautiful,” The Florida Review

     
    Others:

    If You Really Love Me Throw Me off the Mountain, by Erin Clark


    “10 Body Positive Instagrammers With Disabilities You Should Follow Immediately” by Nina Matti, Bustle



    Special, Netflix series



    “Sia’s Trailer For ‘Music’ Struck A Nerve With The Disabled Community. Her Tweets Only Made Things Worse.” By Allison Norlian, Forbes


    The Golden Girls, TV series


    “Texas Lt. Governor: Old People Should Volunteer to Die to Save the Economy” by Bess Levin, Vanity Fair


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    • 1 hr 8 min
    Life After Trump: Jess Walter and Jerald Walker on the Aftermath of Election 2020

    Life After Trump: Jess Walter and Jerald Walker on the Aftermath of Election 2020

    In this week’s episode of Fiction/Non/Fiction, co-hosts Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan talk to acclaimed novelist Jess Walter and award-winning essayist Jerald Walker. First, Walter unravels the literary elements of the Trump administration and discusses how his newest book, The Cold Millions, a historical novel touching on unions and feminism at the turn of the century, has many parallels to today’s politics. Then, Walker talks about centering Black courage vs. white cruelty, both in literature and this election, and how he works to find common ground in his writing, including his newest collection of essays, How to Make a Slave, which is a finalist for the National Book Award.
    To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. And check out video excerpts from our interviews at LitHub’s Virtual Book Channel and Fiction/Non/Fiction’s YouTube Channel.
    This podcast is produced by Andrea Tudhope. 
    Selected readings:
    Jess Walter

    The Cold Millions

    Beautiful Ruins

    We Live in Water

    The Financial Lives of the Poets


    ‘The Ponz’: Michael Cohen's Prison Memoir



    Jerald Walker

    How to Make a Slave and Other Essays

    The World in Flames: A Black Boyhood in a White Supremacist Doomsday Cult

    Street Shadows: A Memoir of Race, Rebellion, and Redemption

    Once More to the Ghetto and Other Essays

    “Dragon Slayers”

     
    Others:

    King Lear by William Shakespeare

    Elmore Leonard

    Henry IV, Part II by William Shakespeare


    “Did the pandemic sink Trump’s chances? Not as much as his opponents expected,” by Alex Roarty, McClatchy


    “'You are no longer my mother': A divided America will struggle to heal after Trump era,” by Tim Reid, Gabriella Borter, Michael Martina, Reuters

    Hue and Cry, by James Alan McPherson

    James Alan McPherson

    Albert Murray

    Stanley Crouch

    “The Little Man at Chehaw Station” by Ralph Ellison

    Self Help by Lorrie Moore


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    • 1 hr 13 min
    Monsters for President: Maria Dahvana Headley on Modern Myth-Making

    Monsters for President: Maria Dahvana Headley on Modern Myth-Making

    In this week’s episode of Fiction/Non/Fiction, co-hosts Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan talk to #1 New York Times best-selling author Maria Dahvana Headley about the modern-day relevance of the epic poem Beowulf. She talks about her new translation of the ancient text, and illuminates how the “shit-talking” masculinity of the heroes of old can help us understand our current so-called leaders.
    To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. And check out video excerpts from our interviews at LitHub’s Virtual Book Channel and Fiction/Non/Fiction’s YouTube Channel.
    This podcast is produced by Andrea Tudhope.
    Selected readings:
    Maria Dahvana Headley 

    Beowulf: A New Translation 

    The Mere Wife 


    Arie 


    Queen of Kings

    The Year of Yes

    The End of the Sentence, Kat Howard and Maria Dahvana Headley

    Unnatural Creatures, Neil Gaiman (Editor), Briony Morrow-Cribbs (Illustrator), Maria Dahvana Headley

     
    Others:

    Transcript: Donald Trump’s Taped Comments About Women, The New York Times

    Sarah Cooper and Helen Mirren Recreate Donald Trump’s Infamous ‘Access Hollywood’ Tape, HuffPost

    A “Beowulf” for Our Moment, Ruth Franklin, The New Yorker

    George Conway (Twitter)

    Walter Shaub (Twitter)

    Earth Abides, George R. Stewart 

    Circe, Madeline Miller

    The Odyssey, (translated by) Emily Wilson

    Beowulf, Seamus Heaney


    Television:
    The Wire (HBO)

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    • 54 min
    We're in a Scary Movie, and It's Called 2020: emily m. danforth and Laura van den Berg Discuss Literary Horror and Our Upcoming Election

    We're in a Scary Movie, and It's Called 2020: emily m. danforth and Laura van den Berg Discuss Literary Horror and Our Upcoming Election

    In this week’s episode of Fiction/Non/Fiction, co-hosts Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan talk to novelist emily m. danforth and short story writer Laura van den Berg. danforth discusses her newly released sapphic-gothic horror comedy Plain Bad Heroines and how she reclaims negative and othering portrayals of lesbian vampires and queer monsters in the novel. Then, van den Berg shares her acclaimed new story collection I Hold a Wolf by the Ears and talks about how the pandemic and the Trump presidency has inspired her fiction. 
    To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. And check out video excerpts from our interviews at LitHub’s Virtual Book Channel and Fiction/Non/Fiction’s YouTube Channel.
    This episode was produced by Andrea Tudhope, Emily Standlee and Mary Henn. 
    Selected readings:
    emily m. danforth

    Plain Bad Heroines

    The Miseducation Of Cameron Post

     
    Laura van den Berg

    I Hold a Wolf by the Ears

    The Isle of Youth

    What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us

    Find Me

    The Third Hotel


    Others:

    The Story of Mary MacLane by Mary MacLane

    Rebecca by Dame Daphne du Maurier

    Survivor Song by Paul Tremblay

    Stephen King

    The Elementals by Michael McDowell

    Paperbacks from Hell by Grady Hendrix



    Television:

    Get Out, film


    Lovecraft Country (HBO) 


    Carmilla, the Lesbian Vampire, film

    The Ring, film

    Beetlejuice, film

    The Others, film


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    • 1 hr 7 min
    Fifteen Years After Katrina: Kristina Kay Robinson and Tom Piazza Discuss How the Hurricane Shaped Our Past and Predicted Our Future

    Fifteen Years After Katrina: Kristina Kay Robinson and Tom Piazza Discuss How the Hurricane Shaped Our Past and Predicted Our Future

    In this week’s episode of Fiction/Non/Fiction, co-hosts Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan talk to writer, curator and visual artist Kristina Kay Robinson and novelist and television writer Tom Piazza in the wake of the 15-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Robinson describes the shifting narrative of her hometown, and explains how the U.S. is only now experiencing the full implications of Katrina. Then, Piazza reflects on how the disaster foretold a series of 21st century catastrophes that would affect the most vulnerable among us. 
    To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. And check out video excerpts from our interviews at LitHub’s Virtual Book Channel and Fiction/Non/Fiction’s YouTube Channel.

    This episode was produced by Andrea Tudhope and Emily Standlee. 

    Selected readings:
    Kristina Kay Robinson

    Republica: Temple of Color and Sound, art exhibition

    “Contemplating Extinction as Theme in Basquiat’s ‘Pez Dispenser, 1984,’” poets.org

    “The Darkroom in the Attic: Blackness and Visibility,” Burnaway

    “Ten Years Since: A Meditation on New Orleans,” The Nation

    “Rhythm, Water, and Global Blackness,” The Nation

    “10 Questions for Kristina Kay Robinson,” The Massachusetts Review

    Letter from New Orleans: Down River Road, Burnaway

    The New Orleans African American Museum

    “Spiritually Uncensored,” Sugarcane Magazine

     
    Tom Piazza

    “Incontinental Drift,” The Huffington Post

    City of Refuge

    Why New Orleans Matters

    Devil Sent the Rain

    A Free State

    “Living in the Present with John Prine,” The Oxford American

     
    Writers:

    The Control of Nature by John McPhee

    José Saramago

    Leo Tolstoy

    Maurice Carlos Ruffin

    A.L. Steiner


    Television:


    Treme (HBO)


    Lovecraft Country (HBO)


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    • 1 hr 12 min
    The Past Is Never Dead: Maurice Carlos Ruffin and Michael Gorra on the 'New South' and Whether Faulkner Still Belongs There

    The Past Is Never Dead: Maurice Carlos Ruffin and Michael Gorra on the 'New South' and Whether Faulkner Still Belongs There

    In this week’s episode of Fiction/Non/Fiction, co-hosts Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan are joined by acclaimed novelist Maurice Carlos Ruffin and Pulitzer finalist in Biography Michael Gorra for a conversation about whether demographic changes are finally making the South new. We Cast a Shadow author Ruffin muses on what racial equality looks like in a futuristic South, and ponders whether political compromise can stabilize the oppositional nature of the United States. Then Gorra discusses his book, The Saddest Words: William Faulkner’s Civil War; and considers the intricate set of limitations that come with writing from multiple fictional perspectives. 
    To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. And check out video excerpts from our interviews at LitHub’s Virtual Book Channel and Fiction/Non/Fiction’s YouTube Channel.
    This podcast is produced by Andrea Tudhope. 
    Selected readings:
    Maurice Carlos Ruffin

    We Cast a Shadow


    The Ones Who Don’t Say They Love You (forthcoming)




    Michael Gorra

    The Saddest Words: William Faulkner’s Civil War

    Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece

    The Bells in Their Silence: Travels Through Germany

    The English Novel at Mid-Century: From the Leaning Tower

    After Empire: Scott, Naipaul, Rushdie

     
    Books: 

    Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson

    The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead

    Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

    The Yellow House by Sarah M. Broom

    Heavy: An American Memoir by Kiese Laymon

    The Revisioners by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton

    The Tradition by Jericho Brown

    Dry September by William Faulkner

    Light in August by William Faulkner

    The Unvanquished by William Faulkner

    As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

    Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner

    Intruder in the Dust by William Faulkner

    Go Down, Moses by William Faulkner

    Flags in the Dust by William Faulkner

    Twentieth-Century Fiction and the Black Mask of Humanity by Ralph Ellison

    Shadow and Act by Ralph Ellison

    Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

    South to a Very Old Place by Albert Murray

    To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

    Opinion | How Donald Trump will finally kill the Southern Strategy

     
    Writers:

    HP Lovecraft

    Flannery O’Connor

    Eudora Welty

    Richard Wright

    Zora Neale Hurston

    Nikki Giovanni

    Toni Morrison

    Nafissa Thompson-Spires

    Rion Amilcar Scott

    Jamel Brinkley

    Tayari Jones

    Roxane Gay

    Randall Kenan

    James Baldwin

    Ernest Hemingway

    F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Don DeLillo

    Henry James

    George Eliot

    Jesmyn Ward

    Charles Dickens

    Natasha Trethewey

    Television:

    Lovecraft Country

    Watchmen

    Atlanta

    Films:

    Terminator 2: Judgement Day

    Sorry to Bother You

    Directors:

    Jordan Peele

    Boots Riley

    Donald Glover

    Others:


    Justin Ward (journalist)


    FiveThirtyEight (podcast)


    Stacey Abrams (politician)


    Newt Gingrich (politician)


    James Meredith (civil rights activist)


    Disunion (NYT column)


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    • 1 hr 14 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
61 Ratings

61 Ratings

ustazaduktura ,

Such a fun and thought-provoking podcast

A must listen

CharlieMcGill ,

Amazing

Amazing, contemporary, and timely. Highly recommended!

Abbsamillion ,

Inspiring and Intriguing!

I love this podcast. I’m blown away every week. The podcast has amazing guests, and the discussions are always insightful and entertaining. They cover such a wide range of topics, so this podcast is really for everyone. I listen to them every morning on my way to school, and they wake up my brain for the day!
I would highly recommend this podcast.

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