50 episodes

Frankly Speaking with Tyra G webcast weekly worldwide on Radio Fairfax

Frankly Speaking with Tyra G Tyra Garlington - Tyra G

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Frankly Speaking with Tyra G webcast weekly worldwide on Radio Fairfax

    Welcome to the Whimsical World of Mrs. Z featuring Caroline Zarinelli

    Welcome to the Whimsical World of Mrs. Z featuring Caroline Zarinelli

    The drive to do what you’re good at is instinct. It is what you were created to do. Human instinct in action is pure joy. It’s like a work of art in motion. Your instinct will draw you to the unique expression of your gifts. You can only be fruitful out of your own understanding of and connection with what is in your core.  It is the urging inside you that tells you to make your move now, to reach out now, to hold back until later, or to never give up. Instinct must merge with a purpose to give you a life that fulfills your destiny. And all gifts must be given a place of expression in order for Destiny to unfold. And no matter how gifted you are, you need a place of expression. That place is Destiny.



    Hatched many moons ago, Caroline Zarinelli was soon given the name “Carrie Canary with the Red Red Shoes” for her zestful love of singing, dancing, and signature red Keds. As time passed, the little whippersnapper began writing and directing neighborhood musicals (in the back lot behind her house) which led directly to her do-not-pass-go-or-collect-$200-drumroll-please...degree in Theatre!

    After decades in the school house and studying what is now called "Arts Integration" at Harvard’s Project Zero, Boston Arts Academy, Opening Minds Through the Arts, and Arts Integration Solutions, Mrs. Z has returned to her cottage to create, coach, host Cottage Kids, and produce Blanket Theatre shows.

    This evening, you are invited to sample a few of the creative gifts that are embodied in Caroline's destiny.



    Take a listen and let me know what you think.

    • 57 min
    There is always more: featuring award-winning playwright, author, and singer-songwriter Lezlie Revelle Zucker.

    There is always more: featuring award-winning playwright, author, and singer-songwriter Lezlie Revelle Zucker.

    There is always more.



    "If by chance no one has told you that they love you today, I would be honored to be the first t say, I love you today. I love you because you are and have been so willing to grow. And my how you have grown. You have grown from struggling to searching. From trying to do something to learning how to do it. You have grown from fear to having faith, to demonstrating your courage. You have grown in many ways, consistently demonstrating your willingness and courage to take the next step -- the step toward the profound and divine wisdom buried within yourself. The step toward knowing more about yourself." --Iyanla Vanzant, Until Today 2000.



    Take a listen and learn about this week's phenomenal woman, Lezlie Revelle Zucker. She not only knew there was more, but she also pursued more. The results presented themselves in her becoming an award-winning playwright, author, and singer-songwriter.



    Let me know how you enjoyed her talent.

    • 57 min
    The Face of Homelessness With Tom Barnett, Director of Fairfax County Office To Prevent And End Homelessness

    The Face of Homelessness With Tom Barnett, Director of Fairfax County Office To Prevent And End Homelessness

    According to one estimate, nearly 570,000 people nationwide were homeless on a night in 2019.



    It is estimated that over 3,000 people sleep outside every night in Seattle.



    By Associated Press, Wire Service Content April 10, 2021, at 9:30 a.m.



    Man Sentenced 4 Years for Poisoning 8 California Homeless People, By Associated Press, Wire Service Content April 9, 2021, at 9:48 p.m.



    No Address, No ID, and Struggling to Get Their Stimulus Checks.



    LOS ANGELES (AP) — It is easy to walk past the homeless, to disregard the guy lying on the street, or ignore the woman standing at an intersection holding a handwritten sign with a plea for help.



    It’s harder to look away when you’ve seen their eyes.



    Look past lines drawn by hard living or the still-soft skin of someone young but struggling to break the cycle of dependency or abuse.



    Their eyes hint at lost promise or offer a glimmer of hope. Some are haunting, some placid. Others troubled or masking troubles. Some are warm and tender, others tough and anxious.



    Have YOU ever looked into the eyes of someone who is homeless? Maybe not the eyes, but have you ever stopped to consider who was homeless.



    Tom Barnett, Director of Fairfax County Office to Prevent and End Homelessness looks beyond the apparent, into housing policies, procedures, and practices.



    The office to Prevent and End Homelessness, part of Fairfax County’s Department of Housing and Community Development, manages and coordinates services to help people experiencing homelessness regain housing stability, including street outreach, emergency shelters, hypothermia prevention, and supportive housing.  The agency also serves as the lead for the Continuum of Care and collaborates with other county agencies, nonprofits, faith and business communities, and those with lived experience of homelessness to achieve the vision that every person in the community can access and maintain safe and affordable housing.



    Take a listen below and learn.

    • 57 min
    Meet phenomenal woman and physician, Dr. Tiffany Simpson.

    Meet phenomenal woman and physician, Dr. Tiffany Simpson.

    This month Frankly Speaking is focusing once again on phenomenal women and how we embrace and manage our universal experiences, our rainbows and clouds, and our courage and resolve.



    We are a journey, not a destination, a process, not an event. Even when we are still, we are motion, loving, serving, nurturing, encouraging, and empowering. We are love and love does. But sometimes, sometimes we get stuck between our no longer the familiar, the habits and our not yet, who we were created to be, and we may ask the question: “Am I enough?”  



    By the way, the right answer is a resounding YES!



    In order for a woman to realize that she is more than a mother, more than a wife, more than what she earns, or what she does to earn a living, she must know her own worth. It means she must test herself and her limits. A woman must learn to describe herself and establish her own expectations for herself. A woman must encourage herself. She must support and nurture herself. She must be willing to be disliked. She must be willing to violate the descriptions and confines placed on her.



    This week's conversation provides an example of one woman who has figured out how to walk in her worthiness as wife, mother of three very busy girls, four pets, and managing physician of her neonatology practice.



    Her story feels comfortable and joy filled in the telling and yet reality informs us there must be challenges. Yet she has found a healthy way to separate her circumstances from who she is. Listen and be inspired. It feels like you are having coffee with a friend.

    • 58 min
    Stories you tell yourself when the White House calls with Ashwani Jain

    Stories you tell yourself when the White House calls with Ashwani Jain

    This month’s theme, “Stories We Grew up with”, expands our appreciation of who we have become as a result of the stories we have been told and the ones we have told ourselves growing up. We look at how these stories have impacted our behavior, our thoughts, our dreams, Ultimately, I believe everyone not only has a story but also is a story.



    Author  David Denborough, Ph.D. writes  “Who we are and what we do are influenced by the stories that we tell ourselves…There are many different events in our lives, but only some of them get formed into the storylines of our identities. Whatever storyline we have about our lives makes a difference in who we are and how we act.”[1]



    Join my guest Ashwani Jain whose family told him that he was good enough, that he was loved, and that he was a survivor. These stories became his own while he survived cancer as a preteen and his first job rejection from the White House. I said the first because he was offered a second. You will love his spirit and his story.



    Listen and be inspired!



    [1] https://psychcentral.com/blog/the-power-of-our-personal-stories/

    • 58 min
    REWIND: A courageous conversation about the opioid crisis with Lucy Caldwell

    REWIND: A courageous conversation about the opioid crisis with Lucy Caldwell

    I want to open the door to a common thought space with some quotes from people who have walked into dark places and come up with dark solutions or who have loved others who have done so. I don’t know anyone who wakes up and say, “I want to be a criminal, I want to be homeless, or I want to be an addict. And yet sometimes the unlikely happens…



    Anonymous from Birmingham Alabama says:



    “I'm a good person. I'm a contributing member of society. I'm educated. I have a good job, make good money, have wonderful relationships with my loved ones. I'm so completely average. The only thing that sets me apart from that other young business professional that seems to have it all is that I'm addicted to opiates. And the problem is that I tell myself every day it's not a problem because I am able to carry my life on in a normal way...



    I'm not a typical addict. I don't steal, lie to borrow money, I don't manipulate people, I don't engage in promiscuous activity...since it's not ruining my life in the way of major money, legal, or relationship issues I tell myself that it's not ruining my life. I'm delusional.”



    Britany from Takoma says:



    “I wish that people understood that heroin/opioid addiction has no face. It spares no soul, and once it has you in its tight grips, you'll spend your life fighting out of its hell hole. Opiate withdrawal relieves you of all morale and ethical codes you thought you once lived by and transforms you into a hollow shell of the human spirit you were born with. This drug was beyond a shadow of a doubt the scariest most difficult drug I've ever had to quit.”



    Margie who lost her son in 2010, when he was 22



    While I am a mother who lost her son to an opioid overdose, it does not define me, or my family. My son still matters, even though most people cannot bring themselves to even say his name, or recall his memory. I am forever missing my son, Mitchell, and he is my inspiration to wake up and live, every single day.



    We are survivors of one of the worst wars in America. We cry every day. We cry for those that will die today, tomorrow, next week, next month and on and on. We cry for their families, and with their families. We are losing beautiful, creative, and loving people, every 19 minutes, and over 120 people a day. It seems like no one cares, that there is no outrage. This is a silent killer, and not enough noise is being made about this modern-day scourge in America.



    That they never intended for this to happen to them. That they wish they never would have started. They feel pretty bad about themselves already without judgment from everyone else. They were still good, caring people. Addiction just completely overtook them.

    Walk into the Fairfax County Virginia opioid crisis with our guide, Lucy Caldwell, Former Fairfax County Poice Spokesperson and current Director of Communications at Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board.



    Take a listen. Learn things. Share.

    • 58 min

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