60 episodes

A brilliant history and heritage podcast created by Hampshire History Trust, the charity that also organises Winchester Heritage Open Days.Our aim is to offer everyone the opportunity to delve into the past and go on a journey to discover hidden heritage and hear fascinating untold tales. We usually talk to experts and enthusiasts who are based in Hampshire and/or who have stories to share about Hampshire’s history and heritage. Occasionally though we may go further afield, it just depends where the research and the stories take us!

Hampshire HistBites Hampshire History Trust

    • History

A brilliant history and heritage podcast created by Hampshire History Trust, the charity that also organises Winchester Heritage Open Days.Our aim is to offer everyone the opportunity to delve into the past and go on a journey to discover hidden heritage and hear fascinating untold tales. We usually talk to experts and enthusiasts who are based in Hampshire and/or who have stories to share about Hampshire’s history and heritage. Occasionally though we may go further afield, it just depends where the research and the stories take us!

    Walkeology: Wanders, Wonders and Wunderkammers

    Walkeology: Wanders, Wonders and Wunderkammers

    In this episode, the final one of Season 7 we join Fay Stevens, Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Notre Dame, and explore walking as a question. 

    An archaeologist by training, Fay is interested in the potential of objects and the way we organise them to inspire wonder and stimulate both the individual mind and collective conversation. 
    We can all create a ‘wunderkammer’ – a cabinet of curiosities – that mirrors our experience, emotions and environment as we go. In doing so, we follow in the footsteps of great antiquarians including Elias Ashmole and Sir John Soane, and engage with a rich heritage that lives not just in museums, but wherever we walk, collect and curate- even on our kitchen tables.


    If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.

    • 33 min
    Hampshire Cultural Trust: Linking the Past with the Future

    Hampshire Cultural Trust: Linking the Past with the Future

    Hampshire Cultural Trust is an organisation that manages twenty-three museums, arts centres, and galleries across the county and cares for millions of historical objects. Chief Executive Paul Sapwell reveals what it takes to keep such a vast network of history and culture accessible to Hampshire’s residents. Additionally, he explores some exciting developments the Trust is undertaking, as well as a behind-the-scenes look at a fascinating partnership.


    If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.

    • 20 min
    The Hidden House in Hursley Park

    The Hidden House in Hursley Park

    Hursley Park near Winchester is a private estate owned by the IBM. Here you will find new buildings and also an 18th-century Queen Anne style mansion in which - many of our listeners will recall - once saw spitfires built in the ballroom! Today’s story however is takes us back even further in time as once a grand Tudor house stood here, almost forgotten apart from a faint outline on the croquet lawn.
     In 2021, the Winchester Archaeology Rescue Group (WARG) was given exclusive access to excavate the site and learn more about what was hiding under the earth. Dave Key, the voluntary science historian at Hursley Park and Stuart Rippon, a member of WARG reveals the incredible discoveries they made.


    If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.

    • 29 min
    Tragedy at Sea: Southampton's Connection to the Titanic

    Tragedy at Sea: Southampton's Connection to the Titanic

    As the RMS Titanic left Southampton on 10th April 1912, crowds filled the docks to wave goodbye to their friends and family. Many of the ship’s crew and passengers were Southampton natives who would never return to their city again.

    Mary Taylor, a Southampton tourist guide, leads listeners on a trail through Southampton to historic sites relating to the ship, reveals how the city mourned after the tragedy, and explores the real stories of passengers aboard the ill-fated journey.


    If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.

    • 30 min
    The Life and Death of Henry V’s Navy in Hampshire

    The Life and Death of Henry V’s Navy in Hampshire

    For centuries, England has been known as one of the world’s strongest naval powers, but in the tumultuous age of Henry V, this fearsome reputation had yet to be forged. During the Hundred Years’ War, England and France waged a fierce war at sea. In this episode, Dr Ian Friel talks about Hampshire’s vital role in defending England and attacking France, as well as the brutal methods medieval sailors waged war on each other.


    If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.

    • 24 min
    Pear Tree Church: From the Bishop of Winchester to the Life of Pi

    Pear Tree Church: From the Bishop of Winchester to the Life of Pi

    Join us for a fascinating insight into the history of the little-known Pear Tree Church in Southampton. From its peaceful position close to the eastern bank of the River Itchen, Pear Tree’s influence and intrigue stretch far wider than first jumps out to the eye. In fact, the Church represents the oldest place of worship anywhere in the world to have been intentionally constructed as a seat of the Anglican faith (rather than converted from use as a Catholic site, for example). What’s more, the sermon written for its consecration has gone on to have a worldwide impact, acting as the template for every service since conducted to inaugurate Anglican churches worldwide. Join us to hear how, and why this came to be.
    Stepping back from the grand and the global, there’s also a wealth of local history to discover in Pear Tree’s own story. In this episode, we’ll hear how the church has played a role in reflecting the ups and downs of its host city over the last four hundred years. Its roots were simple – though there’s rumour of a royal sapling somewhere along the way – and tell a story of a small community at the edge of a great maritime centre. Yet, over time, Pear Tree profited from growth, reinvention and the city’s evolution first into a bathing station and then a spa town at the heart of global merchant networks. Its fabric tells this story in their gradual aggrandisement.
    Nonetheless, there’s also a darker side to the site - a sorry tale of the sea and struggle for life. Within the Church’s walls lies a monument to one of Southampton’s young sons shipwrecked, killed by cannibals and eventually commemorated in the well-known novel The Life of Pi. This is no simple story - maritime tradition, family love and the history of English law are all woven within. Listen in for more.


    WARNING: THIS EPISODE INCLUDES REFERENCES TO CANNIBALISM, WHICH SOME LISTENERS MAY FIND DISTURBING.


    For more information about this episode, or to browse some of our other seasons, visit our website.

    • 26 min

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