150 episodes

History lectures by Samuel Biagetti, a historian (and antique dealer) with a Phd in early American history; my dissertation was on Freemasonry in the 1700s. I focus on the historical myths and distortions, from "the Middle Ages" to "Race," that people use to rationalize the world in which we live. More info at www.historiansplaining.com

Please see my Patreon page, https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632, if you want to keep the lectures coming, and to hear the patron-only materials.

Historiansplaining: A historian tells you why everything you know is wrong Samuel Biagetti

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 72 Ratings

History lectures by Samuel Biagetti, a historian (and antique dealer) with a Phd in early American history; my dissertation was on Freemasonry in the 1700s. I focus on the historical myths and distortions, from "the Middle Ages" to "Race," that people use to rationalize the world in which we live. More info at www.historiansplaining.com

Please see my Patreon page, https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632, if you want to keep the lectures coming, and to hear the patron-only materials.

    Fortresses on Sand: The History of Florida -- pt. 6

    Fortresses on Sand: The History of Florida -- pt. 6

    In the final lecture on Florida, we examine how the tropical state, thanks to innovations like DDT, orange-juice concentrate, and air conditioning, was able to boom at an unimaginable pace, rocketing into the top five biggest states in the union, with massive scientific and artistic communities, a diverse immigrant mosaic, and after the Civil Rights movement, exceptionally volatile and unpredictable politics. We consider the importance of the last great expression of Florida utopianism -- namely, Disney World -- and the shift into a perceived playground of anarchy and American dreams gone mad, as personified in the notorious "Florida Man."

    Rolling Stone article outline ways to help Florida, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico following Hurricane Ian: https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-news/hurricane-ian-victims-help-donate-florida-puerto-rico-cuba-dominican-republic-1234601215/

    Suggested further reading: Gannon, "Florida: A Short History"; Nolan, "Fifty Feet in Paradise: The Booming of Florida."

    Please sign up as a patron at any level in order to hear patron-only materials, including the latest "Myth of the Month" on Conspiracy Theories -- https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

    • 2 hr 2 min
    Latin America Inverts the World Map: A Conversation With Margarita Fajardo

    Latin America Inverts the World Map: A Conversation With Margarita Fajardo

    Sam interviews historian Margarita Fajardo, a professor of history at Sarah Lawrence College, about her new book, “The World That Latin America Created,” which traces how a movement of scholars and statesmen centering around CEPAL, a UN economic commission based in Santiago, Chile, formulated a new world-view and far-reaching agenda to foster unity and development in Latin America; the so-called “Capalinos” rose to dominance and set the policy agenda in Brazil and other countries in the 1950s and ‘60s and then set the stage for dependency theory, which took the world by storm in the 1970s. We also discuss how the travails of the Cepalinos might shed light on the transformations currently happening in Chile, Colombia, and other Latin American nations and the horizons that they might open up.

    Margarita’s book opening will be at:
    Location: Recirculation (a branch of Wordup Community Bookshop), 876 Riverside Drive, New York, NY
    Time: Saturday Sept. 24th, starting at 11am.

    Please support this podcast to hear patron-only materials, including the recent lecture on Conspiracy Theories: www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

    • 1 hr 13 min
    China, pt. 2 -- Water and Music: Early Chinese Philosophy

    China, pt. 2 -- Water and Music: Early Chinese Philosophy

    We consider how the crisis of legitimacy and breakdown of order following the downfall of the Zhou dynasty spurred on a flowering of philosophy, as various scholars and sages sought new principles to guide life and achieve harmony, giving rise to the enduring teachings of Taoism and Confucianism, as well as other long-forgotten sects ranging from draconian legalists to humanitarian pacifists.

    Hear the first lecture on China here: https://soundcloud.com/historiansplaining/china-pt-1-making-the-middle-kingdom

    Image: Song-era painting of a landscape with three men laughing, symbolizing Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism.

    Please support this podcast to hear patron-only materials, including the recent lecture on Conspiracy Theories: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

    • 1 hr 23 min
    Teaser -- Myth of the Month 20: Conspiracy Theories

    Teaser -- Myth of the Month 20: Conspiracy Theories

    Where do conspiracy theories come from? Why do some people believe in them and not others? Aren't some of them true? And what kind of purpose or agenda is served by setting apart "conspiracy thories" as a distinct realm of thought? We weigh and examine all the different perspectives, and consider why conspiracy theories are an unavoidable and fundamental aspect of modern democracy.
    This is a short excerpt -- please become a patron at any level to hear the whole discussion and all the patron-only lectures: https://www.patreon.com/posts/myth-of-month-20-70438551

    • 15 min
    Unlocked: Doorways in Time, 2 -- Nag Hammadi Library and the Gnostic Gospels

    Unlocked: Doorways in Time, 2 -- Nag Hammadi Library and the Gnostic Gospels

    Unlocked after one year for patrons only:
    The secretive Gnostic stream of Christianity, which taught a radically different metaphysics and spiritual cosmology from "orthodox" doctrine in the first four hundred years of the church, was largely lost to history, until 1945, when a camel-herder in a remote part of Egypt stumbled upon an old ceremic jar with 13 massive books containing 52 ancient Gnostic texts. We consider what the so-called "Nag Hammadi LIbrary," which may have been hidden in the desert to protect it from destruction, reveals about the origins and importance of the Gnostics' secret teachings.

    Image: A Nag Hammadi codex open to the beginning of the Apocryphon of John.

    Suggested further reading: Jean Doresse, "The Discovery of the Nag Hammadi Texts"; Elaine Pagels, "The Gnostic Gospels."

    Please sign up as a patron to hear all patron-only lectures: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

    • 1 hr 35 min
    Fortresses on Sand: The History of Florida -- pt. 5

    Fortresses on Sand: The History of Florida -- pt. 5

    We follow the southward-racing juggernaut of modern Florida, from statehood in 1845 to the 1930s – the insatiable quest of visionaries and megalomaniacs, from Jewish utopians, to slave-driving planters, to evangelical missionaries, to black politicians, to hotel magnates, to messianic cult leaders, to women’s suffragists, to Cuban revolutionaries, to bohemian poets, to impose a sense of order upon the chaotic and unruly wilderness of tropical Florida. Though ignored in our national mythology and dismissed as a southern backwater, the state was the site of the first confrontation of the Civil War, and of the longest-lasting and most aggressive Reconstruction regime, which created the first universal public school system in the South and fostered the first booming tourist economy in America, spearheaded by none other than Harriet Beecher Stowe. We conclude our journey through Florida with an examination of Florida literature, ending with an analysis of Wallace Stevens’ ode to Florida, “The Idea of Order at Key West.”

    Suggested Further Reading: Foster & Foster, “Beechers, Stowes, and Yankee Strangers: The Transformation of Florida”; J. T. Kirby, “Mockingbird Song: Ecological Landscapes of the South.”

    Please sign up as a patron to hear the next Myth of the Month – www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

    • 2 hr 51 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
72 Ratings

72 Ratings

henry032995 ,

One of the absolute best history podcasts

I became a patreon supporter of this podcast after hearing only a few episodes. It’s very easy to follow and compelling, detailed but never overwhelming, and Sam’s voice has a very neutral and relaxing but clear and direct cadence. Despite the title, this doesn’t have the awful smug tone of vox or NPR or similar mainstream history podcasts. It’s incessantly curious, probing, and rigorous, always quick to point out holes in the official narrative of a historical event or period without being contrarian for its own sake. The episode on Shakespeare Authorship is the single best take I’ve heard on the topic and puts scholars on both sides to shame. There are so many bad, boring, and incurious history podcasts that you have to treasure ones like this. Looking forward to listening through the archive.

wonderin" mind ,

Top shelf podcast

So well researched, interesting, unexpected.

monroelabouisse ,

Fantastic

By far my favorite history podcast and one of my favorite podcasts period. Sam is entertaining, insightful, thorough and thoughtful. I listen to every new pod right away and have listened to the whole archive. Highly recommend!

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