44 episodes

It's sad, but true to say that today Edward Morgan Forster's works are known more from their film and television adaptations rather than from their original novels. Yet, these adaptations have spurred many a fascinated viewer into going back to the library and finding the book that the film or miniseries was based on and this is ultimately the power of Forster's literary appeal.

Howard's End was published in 1910 and it marked Forster's first taste of critical and commercial success. He had published three other novels earlier, Where Angels Fear To Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907) and A Room With a View (1908) but none of them had been received with so much acclaim.

The plot concerns two sisters, Margaret and Helen Schlegel, wealthy, independent and intellectual, who enjoy a privileged life filled with music, theatre, literature and art. Their lively group of friends meets often to discuss the questions of the day with passion and exuberance. Helen meets Paul Wilcox, the son of a commercially successful businessman, Henry Wilcox, and falls in love with him. However, the affair ends badly and the Schlegel sisters slip back into their routine. Another chance meeting at a concert brings Helen in contact with the poor, but socially aspiring bank employee, Leonard Bast. Meanwhile, the sisters are taken aback when the Wilcoxes move into a flat opposite theirs. Margaret and Mrs. Wilcox strike up a deep and spiritual friendship. When Mrs. Wilcox suddenly dies, her materialistic family finds a scribbled note in which she has left her beautiful country home, Howard's End to Margaret. What follows is the soul stirring collision between the three points of view represented by these sets of people.

The intricately woven plot, with its multiple strands constantly meeting, parting, clashing and dissolving into each other, makes Howard's End an unforgettable and very poignant exploration of our moral universe. One of the prophetic questions it asks and gets no answers for is “Who shall inherit our England?” which foreshadows the great social shifts following the Great Wars. There are some beautiful, evocative passages in the book, as in Helen's experience of Beethoven's Fifth where she imagines “goblins marching across the world.”

Howards End by Edward M. Forster Loyal Books

    • Kids & Family
    • 4.7 • 9 Ratings

It's sad, but true to say that today Edward Morgan Forster's works are known more from their film and television adaptations rather than from their original novels. Yet, these adaptations have spurred many a fascinated viewer into going back to the library and finding the book that the film or miniseries was based on and this is ultimately the power of Forster's literary appeal.

Howard's End was published in 1910 and it marked Forster's first taste of critical and commercial success. He had published three other novels earlier, Where Angels Fear To Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907) and A Room With a View (1908) but none of them had been received with so much acclaim.

The plot concerns two sisters, Margaret and Helen Schlegel, wealthy, independent and intellectual, who enjoy a privileged life filled with music, theatre, literature and art. Their lively group of friends meets often to discuss the questions of the day with passion and exuberance. Helen meets Paul Wilcox, the son of a commercially successful businessman, Henry Wilcox, and falls in love with him. However, the affair ends badly and the Schlegel sisters slip back into their routine. Another chance meeting at a concert brings Helen in contact with the poor, but socially aspiring bank employee, Leonard Bast. Meanwhile, the sisters are taken aback when the Wilcoxes move into a flat opposite theirs. Margaret and Mrs. Wilcox strike up a deep and spiritual friendship. When Mrs. Wilcox suddenly dies, her materialistic family finds a scribbled note in which she has left her beautiful country home, Howard's End to Margaret. What follows is the soul stirring collision between the three points of view represented by these sets of people.

The intricately woven plot, with its multiple strands constantly meeting, parting, clashing and dissolving into each other, makes Howard's End an unforgettable and very poignant exploration of our moral universe. One of the prophetic questions it asks and gets no answers for is “Who shall inherit our England?” which foreshadows the great social shifts following the Great Wars. There are some beautiful, evocative passages in the book, as in Helen's experience of Beethoven's Fifth where she imagines “goblins marching across the world.”

    Chapter 01

    Chapter 01

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    • 8 min
    Chapter 02

    Chapter 02

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    • 14 min
    Chapter 03

    Chapter 03

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    • 21 min
    Chapter 04

    Chapter 04

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    • 19 min
    Chapter 05

    Chapter 05

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    • 31 min
    Chapter 06

    Chapter 06

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    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

Reanell Riot ,

Something wonderful

Great book. Rarely have I felt such a perfect conclusion in all ways. The entire thing dives so much into the heart of the human race, what drives us. Our goals and hopes. Shines light on every level of the lives of those in and around London 1908-1910. Lovely reading by Elizabeth Clett, she out does herself again.

Poetry in Flow Motion ,

Great observations

There are things we can learn from these old books that apply to many areas of Life even now, cheers to 'riding on the shoulders of the giants in history' so that we can do better for knowing what they observed

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