39 episodes

Hudson Valley Uncensored, hosted by Brett Freeman, highlights and discusses topics without fear. We explore ideas that are outside mainstream conventional thinking, with a particular focus on current events. We aim to interview local individuals from the Hudson Valley, New York, with unique perspectives on life. We ask the questions that others won’t.

Hudson Valley Uncensored Halston Media

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Hudson Valley Uncensored, hosted by Brett Freeman, highlights and discusses topics without fear. We explore ideas that are outside mainstream conventional thinking, with a particular focus on current events. We aim to interview local individuals from the Hudson Valley, New York, with unique perspectives on life. We ask the questions that others won’t.

    Navigating the Baby Formula Shortage Crisis with Dr. Rodd Stein

    Navigating the Baby Formula Shortage Crisis with Dr. Rodd Stein

    Joining Brett Freeman on the show today is Dr. Rodd Stein. Dr. Stein is a pediatrician with Northern Westchester Hospital, and is a graduate of the Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University. Today, Dr. Stein discusses the baby formula shortage being experienced nationally and offers his expertise on what nursing mothers can do to keep their babies healthy in the midst of this crisis.
    Dr. Stein explains the current situation with the baby formula shortage and how he has seen less cases locally. He strongly advises that mothers should not attempt to create their own formulas by following online recipes. He also offers his recommendation that nursing mothers who are struggling to get formula should try breastfeeding and seek resources from both their pediatricians and local hospitals. Listen in today to access valuable advice from a trusted professional regarding this extremely important topic.
    The Finer Details of This Episode:
    The impact of the present baby formula shortage crisis

    Why mothers should not attempt creating their own formulas

    Resources for struggling mothers who are nursing

    The warning signs of malnutrition in babies

    Quotes:
    “Moms are struggling to obtain baby formula.”
    “The Academy of Pediatrics says don't make your own formula, we have enough resources and things we can do to help keep your baby healthy, without you having to make formula based on recipes online.”
    “The other thing they say not to do is to try and stretch out your formula by diluting what you have. That's a definite 'no'. It can lead to electrolyte imbalances in your baby, which can lead to really severe health issues.”
    “Allergies to breast milk are not very common. There are babies who will have problems with breast milk, but that's usually because they have a milk sensitivity.”
    Show Links:
    Halston Media Group https://www.halstonmedia.com/ (website)

    • 8 min
    05/26/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup

    05/26/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup

    On this week’s episode of Hudson Valley Uncensored, host Brett Freeman is joined by regulars Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News), and Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ ( The Katonah Lewisboro Times), plus Carol Reif, managing director ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ ( The Somers Record), and reporters Whit Anderson, Gino De Angelis, and Sophia Caselnova. First up, Marschhauser reports on the Board of Education elections in Lakeland, Yorktown, and Katonah Lewisboro. As predicted, the incumbents reigned supreme, despite challenges from grassroots groups who disapprove of what the board has been doing. In response, Marschhauser and Freeman discuss the incumbents’ power as representatives of stability and the status quo. Dumas also has an update on the school board elections in Mahopac, where there was some controversy with anti-vaxxers but which ended with a win for the more moderate candidates. The bigger news in Dumas’ area is that the Manhattan school budget failed to pass by eight votes. The school district can put it back up, but if they end up going to austerity, they may have to cut programs, including sports and after-school activities. Dumas is also looking into an unconfirmed story about a sexual assault at a business in Carmel, with the police making an arrest over the weekend.
    North Salem and Somers have also been holding school board elections, and Reif reports on the results there. She also mentions that the Somers Record will be covering career day at Lincoln Hall and reports that Quantico Elementary School’s principal will be retiring, triggering a year of transition as the district’s superintendent is also retiring in 2023. Reif then reports that the HyGrade in Croton Falls—a revamped deli/grocery store that will serve food, coffee, and beer—may finally be opening in a couple of weeks. There’s also a contentious story coming out of Mount Kisco over a cell tower that may or may not be sited in Leonard Park—the town’s only park—with people questioning if this will actually benefit people who own cell phones in the area. Next, Anderson jumps in with more school board voting from Bedford, where the three incumbents whose terms were ending chose not to run again. Anderson suggests that’s not a coincidence but is likely because of the special education scandal that’s been going on. In addition, Bedford’s school budget got overwhelmingly approved along with two bonds. De Angelis then has a story from the Lewisboro Planning Board about a subdivision development in Vista that’s been frequently delayed. There was a point of contention about letting it go to a public hearing, but this was outvoted, and it will be discussed in the next meeting on June 15. Caselnova then reports that Yorktown Town Board is working with the local food alliance to launch a baby formula drive in response to the widespread shortages, and Reif mentions the Westchester Formula Finders, an organization that searches for baby formula and lets people know where they can access it. Finally, in last week’s episode, the group teased a story about a big business shutting down in Somers; this week, they reveal that the business is The Mexican Shack, a jewelry and gift store run by Somers icon Steve Delzio, which will be closing after forty-seven years of business.
    Episode Highlights:
    Joining Brett today are two editors from the Halston Media team—Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News), and Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News) and https://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ (The Katonah Lewisboro Times). Also present are Carol Reif, managing director ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Sale

    • 28 min
    05/18/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup

    05/18/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup

    On this week’s episode of Hudson Valley Uncensored, host Brett Freeman is joined by regulars Tom Walogorsky, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ ( The Somers Record); Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News); and Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ ( The Katonah Lewisboro Times), plus reporters Gino De Angelis, Whit Anderson, Sophia Caselnova, and Tom Bartley. The episode kicks off with an announcement about Halston Media’s new monthly publication, The Mount Kisco Bedford Times. Its coverage area includes Mount Kisco, Bedford, and Pound Ridge, and its first issue, out May 19, will cover the local fire departments’ new chiefs, Martha Stewart’s tag sale, and a community forum with Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney. Then, in more Bedford news, we hear about a scandal involving photos of special ed students, the proposed budget for the next school year, and the Oak Ridge water treatment plant’s funding to expand its filtration system. Bartley also reports that Bedford is having second thoughts about opting out of allowing retail outlets to sell marijuana and discusses the reasons behind this U-turn.
    Next, Caselnova jumps in with some Yorktown news, including the town board’s decision to invest $1.2 million in the community center and theater, the Relay for Life, and plans to build a haunted house property in the back of the JV mall. Marschhauser then takes the Yorktown baton to report on a lawsuit involving an attempt to stop property development on the former Soundview Prep School site. He also covers the school board elections, which have gotten pretty intense with disagreements over how the board handled the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion movement. Meanwhile, Dumas has a story about violin scammers in Mahopac—fake violinists who use pre-recorded music to cheat money out of passers-by—and some sad news about pets being abandoned now that people are returning to normal life post-pandemic. He also covers a heartwarming story about the late Judge James Reitz, a Mahopac icon, having a courtroom in Putnam Country Court named in his honor. And finally, we squeeze in some North Salem and Somers Town news, with Walogorsky reporting that Board of Education elections are happening there too and hinting at a mysterious story involving the retirement of a long-standing business that could be big news for local residents.
    Episode Highlights:
    Joining today are three editors from the Halston Media team— Tom Walogorsky, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News) and https://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ (The Somers Record); Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News); and Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News) and https://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ (The Katonah Lewisboro Times).

    Also present for this episode are reporters Gino De Angelis, Whit Anderson, Sophia Caselnova, and Tom Bartley.

    On May 19, Halston Media is launching a new monthly publication called The Mount Kisco Bedford Times. Its coverage area includes Mount Kisco, Bedford, and Pound Ridge, and its first issue will include stories on the local fire departments’ new chiefs, Martha Stewart’s tag sale, and a community forum with Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney.

    Richard Gere has sold his house in Pound Ridge for a large amount of money, so he will be leaving the Pound Ridge Community… but he’s moved to North Salem, so there’ll be no escaping Halston Media!

    A major story has been happening in the Bedford Central school district involving photos of special ed students in the high school boys’ bathroom that were then distributed among the student body and on social media. The students’ parents were

    • 37 min
    03/28/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup and Dr. Paul Strombom on Colorectal Cancer Awareness

    03/28/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup and Dr. Paul Strombom on Colorectal Cancer Awareness

    Editorial Roundup and Dr. Paul Strombom on Colorectal Cancer Awareness
    This week on Hudson Valley Uncensored, Brett Freeman has an interview with colon and rectal surgeon Dr. Paul Strombom from Phelps Hospital to talk about Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Then, later on in the episode, he also is joined by regulars Tom Walogorsky, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ ( The Somers Record), Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News), and Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ ( The Katonah Lewisboro Times).
    First up, Freeman is joined by Dr. Paul Strombom to discuss colorectal cancer and the importance of getting regular screenings. They start out by discussing the increase in colon cancer rates in the under-50s and the simultaneous decrease in the over-65s. Dr. Strombom says that there’s no obvious reason for the increase in younger patients, though diet and environment may be factors, but the decrease in older patients is down to better screening and the ability to remove pre-cancerous polyps during colonoscopies. He then reassures listeners that the colonoscopy process isn’t so bad (though the bowel prep process is a different matter) and that it’s the best way to prevent colon cancer, along with a healthy diet and quitting smoking. Freeman brings up the question of symptoms, and Dr. Strombom points out that many patients have no symptoms, which is why regular screening is so important in order to catch any problems early. He also addresses the higher rate of colon cancer in African Americans and explains that access to regular screening is a factor in this problem. The discussion then moves to what happens after a colonoscopy, Dr. Strombom explaining that polyps are sent to the pathologist to be tested and that the type and number of them will determine the regularity of your repeat colonoscopies, which can be anything from ten years to three months. And finally, they return to screenings, with Dr. Strombom explaining that while colonoscopy is the best type, there are other, less invasive procedures available, and the most important thing is to attend your annual screening of whatever type.
    Following the interview ,Walogorsky has the big news out of Somers Town that Bill Faulkner is throwing his hat into the ring and running for Congress in the 16th District this fall. He’ll be taking on Jamal Bowman, who’s also going to be primarying Vedat Gashi, and Dumas joins in to say that he just interviewed a very confident Gashi, who took some shots at Bowman’s alignment with the Democratic Party’s views. In response, Freeman brings up the issue of President Biden’s stance on energy independence and says he’d be curious to see whether self-proclaimed “Biden Democrat” Gashi agrees with the President or not. Moving on, Marschhauser reports on some progress in Yorktown’s project to bring sewers to 315 homes, which had been held up by the county’s refusal to release funds for the project unless Yorktown signed up for the affordable housing code it repealed in 2016. After a six-month logjam, the county now seems to have backed off from its demand following the federal government’s recent approval of $1.2 million for the sewer project. Dumas then reports on a controversial change to Mahopac’s town board meetings, Supervisor Carrazi having decided to scrap the new business public comment sessions, causing upset among town members. Finally, Marschhauser and Walogorsky close this section of the episode with a roundup of what’s happening in their areas, including the opening of a new supermarket, a march in support of Ukraine, and the beginning of spring sports season.
    Episode Highlights:
    March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, which aims to bring awareness of colon cancer and encourage peo

    • 21 min
    13/14/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup

    13/14/2022 Weekly Editorial Roundup

    On this week’s episode of Hudson Valley Uncensored, host Brett Freeman is joined by some new guests—Jessica Einterz, reporter forhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ ( The Katonah Lewisboro Times) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News), and Whit Anderson, reporter forhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ ( The Somers Record) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News). Also joining them are regulars Tom Walogorsky, editor of North Salem News and The Somers Record; Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News); and Brian Marschhauser, editor of Yorktown News and The Katonah Lewisboro Times.
    New reporter Einterz starts us off with a story she’s working on about the rise in gas prices, and the group discusses the impact on local businesses and families as well as how politics always finds its way into such discussions. Then we have a slew of positive local news, starting with Halston Media’s very own Corinne Stanton winning the Greater Mahopac-Carmel Chamber of Commerce’s Business Person of the Year and Somers resident Steve Wilson climbing Mount Kilimanjaro for the second time, this time after donating one of his kidneys. Meanwhile, Walogorsky reports on two local groups in Salem collecting medical supplies for Ukraine, and Einterz tells us about her interview with a food truck owner who uses a community-minded pay-what-you-want business model.
    Turning to more dramatic news, Anderson reports on Somers resident Vicenzo Fidanza, who was arrested on March 1 by the New York State Police for multiple felony drug and weapons charges. Included in Fidanza’s cache was over twenty pounds of cocaine and over 1,500 grams of amphetamines, and he was in possession of an AK-47; he was denied bail and remains in custody. The group then moves on to politics, with Matt Slater’s confirmation that he is seeking the assembly nomination for District 94 and Vedat Gashi officially announcing that he’s running for Congress, as well as rumors that Michael Grace is running for Lieutenant Governor. Walogorsky then follows up on a story about a brick being thrown through the window of the State Trooper barracks in Somers and the helicopter chase that followed, resulting in the arrest of a nineteen-year-old who is now facing second-degree criminal mischief charges. And we finish up with a preview of Walogorsky’s upcoming interview with a MasterChef Junior contestant from South Salem and a discussion of whether Gordon Ramsay yells at kids or if he keeps his temper just for adults.
    Episode Highlights:
    Two new Halston Media staff join today’s roundup—Jessica Einterz, reporter forhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ ( The Katonah Lewisboro Times) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News), and Whit Anderson, reporter forhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ ( The Somers Record) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News).

    Also present today are three editors from the Halston Media team—Tom Walogorsky, editor of North Salem News and The Somers Record; Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( )Yorktown News and The Katonah Lewisboro Times; and Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News).

    Einterz has been working on a story about the rise in gas prices, and the group discusses the impact of this on shipping prices, grocery prices, and businesses and families.

    For the first time in two years, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade returns to Mahopac on Sunday, March 13. It’s the third-largest St Patrick’s Day parade in the state of New York, and this year’s Grand Marshall is Eddie McDowell from Atlanta Southeast.

    Mahopac News’ own Corinne Stanton, one of our sales executives, has been named Business Person of the Year by the Greater Mahopac-Carmel Chamber of Commerce. Mahopac News will be doing a feature on Corinne this we

    • 30 min
    New York State Senator Pete Harckham

    New York State Senator Pete Harckham

    Today, host Brett Freeman is joined by a very special guest, Senator Pete Harckham of the 40th Senate district in the state of New York. The Senator is here to answer questions on topics ranging from bail reform to his bill on ADUs to redistricting in NYC. Joining Brett in asking the questions are Tom Walogorsky, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ ( The Somers Record), Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ ( The Katonah Lewisboro Times), and Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News). Our first question is on bail reform and the pushback it’s been getting. Senator Harckham responds that the bail reform bill does need to be revised—in fact, he was one of those leading the fight to revise it—but we also need to address the root causes of violence and help all communities to develop the determinants of safe communities, like access to employment and world-class healthcare. The discussion then turns to the Senator’s bill on Accessory Dwelling Units and his goal to use ADUs as a low-impact way of addressing the lack of affordable housing in areas like Northern Westchester. Walogorsky then asks about the rise in opioid overdoses during the pandemic and what the Senator, in his role as Chairman of the Committee of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, thinks about the legalization of marijuana in New York State. Senator Harckham responds that the opioid crisis is down to many factors, including the stress of the pandemic and the presence of fentanyl in the drug chain, and says that one of the key factors in dealing with the crisis is the regulation of recovery houses. He also speaks on the thinking behind the legalization of marijuana and where the revenue from it will go.
    Next, Marschhauser has a question about the state of the New York economy and the spate of big-box retailers leaving vacancies when they go bust, and the Senator discusses the changes in retail as a result of the growth in delivery services and online stores, suggesting that while mom-and-pop stores will likely survive, the era of big-footprint retail may be over. The conversation then moves to the rise in energy prices, with the Senator outlining legislation he’s drafting to ensure energy customers aren’t hit with huge, unexpected bills, as well as the decommissioning of the Indian Point nuclear plant and the future for nuclear energy in New York State. Dumas then brings up the issue of redistricting in NYC, and Senator Harckham explains the reasons behind the changes and the impact they will have on his own district. And finally, the Senator addresses the controversial move to include race as one of the criteria for COVID therapeutics, stating that while there is a need to reassure the black and brown communities disproportionately impacted by the pandemic that they will not be forgotten, there is no rationing being implemented and no shortage of therapeutics in New York State.
    Episode Highlights:
    Three editors from the Halston Media team join today’s roundup: Tom Walogorsky, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/north-salem/ ( North Salem News) and https://www.tapinto.net/towns/somers/ (The Somers Record); Brian Marschhauser, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/yorktown/ ( Yorktown News) andhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/katonah-slash-lewisboro/ ( The Katonah Lewisboro Times); and Bob Dumas, editor ofhttps://www.tapinto.net/towns/mahopac/ ( Mahopac News).

    Senator Harckham was elected to the New York State Senate in November 2018 and represents several different towns in Hudson Valley, including the towns of Beekman, Pawling, Carmel, Patterson, and Southeast.

    There’s been some pushback on bail reform from people in law enforcement, among others. Senator Harckham agrees that the first version of bail reform was not perfect—in

    • 35 min

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