52 episodes

I SEE U is a unique new program that gives voice to those who have often been unheard. Hosted by Houston Public Media’s Eddie Robinson, I SEE U explores cultural identity through the stories of people and places that have been transformed by the effects of long-standing biases. Eddie guides fascinating conversations with newsmakers who share their personal histories, their struggles and their triumphs. In listening, we learn to empathize and hopefully experience a few ‘a-ha’ moments for ourselves.

I SEE U with Eddie Robinson Houston Public Media

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 12 Ratings

I SEE U is a unique new program that gives voice to those who have often been unheard. Hosted by Houston Public Media’s Eddie Robinson, I SEE U explores cultural identity through the stories of people and places that have been transformed by the effects of long-standing biases. Eddie guides fascinating conversations with newsmakers who share their personal histories, their struggles and their triumphs. In listening, we learn to empathize and hopefully experience a few ‘a-ha’ moments for ourselves.

    19: Women of The Revolution [Encore]

    19: Women of The Revolution [Encore]

    The legendary Prince created an iconic band known as, The Revolution. Not only did the early ’80s group incorporate an energy and sound that threw off music radio programmers worldwide, but The Revolution also consisted of overwhelming talent that embraced notions of diversity and inclusion with members from different backgrounds, ethnicities, races and sexual orientations. Two band members — Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman — were romantically involved with each other and had kept their relationship under wraps from the public during the band’s popularity. Host Eddie Robinson chats with the Emmy winners separately as they offer up career introspection and how their strong partnership played a significant impact on Prince. I SEE U also introduces a new guest host — author and political science professor, Dr. Melanye Price. She’ll be the guiding voice for a couple of months while Eddie becomes a new dad and goes on paternity break. This episode is an encore of the October 2, 2021 broadcast.

    • 53 min
    51: Someday, Will We Ever Be Free?

    51: Someday, Will We Ever Be Free?

    Many view Juneteenth as a celebration for slaves in Texas who finally received word on June 19, 1865, that they were free. But it took more than two years for that news to reach the ears of those enslaved after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. While it took several more months for slavery to be abolished in 1865, a system known as convict leasing had emerged in Southern states where Blacks were forced into unpaid labor. Historians note that these factors along with ongoing research provide evidence of how slavery played a major role in building this nation’s economy. Moreover, some experts argue that slavery, mixed with a host of other discriminatory, economic practices like redlining and segregation, contribute to an already large racial wealth gap that continues to grow even wider. Complicating matters, state lawmakers have proposed legislation that attempt to regulate how teachers and educators can discuss those histories in classrooms across the country. Stay tuned as I SEE U takes a provocative look at Juneteenth. We invite the renowned schoolteacher and counselor who was the driving force in making Juneteenth a national holiday, 95-year-old Opal Lee. We’ll also examine the commercialization of this holiday and what efforts are needed for progress with an unguarded chat with Morgan State University’s Journalism Professor, Dr. Jared Ball; and President/CEO of Center of Black Equity in Washington, D.C., Earl D. Fowlkes, Jr.

    • 52 min
    46: Sugar Land Not So Sweet [Encore]

    46: Sugar Land Not So Sweet [Encore]

    Convict leasing, a gruesome practice that started in 1867, was highly profitable for states across the South and for the families who owned plantations. It was a time when Sugar Land, Texas was known to carry a network of sugar cane farms and state-sanctioned labor camps after the abolition of slavery. It also wasn’t uncommon for Black men to be arrested for often times bogus or trumped up charges, so that plantation owners could build a solid workforce of leased laborers. But in February of 2018 at a construction site during excavation, human bones were discovered. Later, an investigation resulted in 95 African-American bodies buried in unmarked plywood coffins, ushering in the country’s first-ever convict labor camp cemetery to be analyzed and studied. Join us as I SEE U takes a “FEEL” trip to Fort Bend County and explores a recently opened educational exhibit called, “Sugar Land 95.” Community and Civic Engagement Coordinator, Chassidy Olainu-Alade, guides host Eddie Robinson on a tour of the memorialization site as well as provides riveting and emotional detail of yet another piece of hidden history that social studies textbooks across America failed to include.

    • 52 min
    3: The Tulsa Opera[tion] [Encore]

    3: The Tulsa Opera[tion] [Encore]

    Scholars have labeled the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 as one of the most horrific incidents of racial violence in U.S. history. But why has that history remained under wraps for so long? Historian Dr. Karlos Hill of the University of Oklahoma; and Scott Ellsworth, author of “The Ground Breaking,” shed light on the disaster. And with this racial attack as a backdrop, host Eddie Robinson chats with acclaimed violinist, Daniel Roumain, about the real reason why he was fired from a special centennial concert hosted by Tulsa Opera. The Opera’s artistic director, Tobias Picker, also makes a guest appearance and responds to Roumain’s accusations with some surprising revelations.

    • 51 min
    50: Good Will Hunting for Great Teachers

    50: Good Will Hunting for Great Teachers

    As the nation continues to mourn those killed in a violent elementary school shooting, teachers in classrooms across Texas are saying, ‘enough is enough.’ Reports of a teacher shortage continue to dominate local and regional headlines. One Houston-area union leader put it best—as fresh faces of new teachers enter classrooms through the front door, more and more seasoned, veteran educators are starting to leave through the back door. Join Host Eddie Robinson as I SEE U presents our 50th episode and celebrates one full year of content with a provocative look at why hundreds of school teachers in the Lone Star State won’t be returning to class next year. We speak candidly with University of Houston Professor, Dr. Duncan Klussmann, who has spent nearly 35 years in public education and helped transform a West Harris County school district of 35,000 students into one of the most successful districts in the region. Klussmann shares his unguarded perspective as it relates to how teacher salaries should be accurately measured and where the future of this profession is headed. I SEE U also welcomes former Houston Independent School District teacher, Terrilyn Batiste, who recently quit her job and now works as a staff member for Houston Public Media.

    • 52 min
    49: A Trans' Mission Never Ends

    49: A Trans' Mission Never Ends

    Lou Weaver is a queer, transgender man who grew up in Colorado, but now lives in Houston as a much sought-after speaker for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and trans community. After his transition from female to a man, Weaver discovered something about himself that shook him to his core: White male privilege! Join I SEE U Host Eddie Robinson for an insightful look at what it really means to be transgender. University of Texas medical researcher, Lou Weaver, shares his powerful story of fearlessness and his strong desire to educate and inform. It’s all part of his mission to provide understanding as to what trans people must endure to simply live their lives and embrace their authentic selves unapologetically.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

SBT2003 ,

A fresh take on under known events

Eddie’s patient but thorough style of storytelling is the perfect medium for exploring undertold stories of the Houston region and beyond. It’s a master class in substance over sizzle.

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