463 episodes

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

Science Weekly itunesu_sunset

    • Science
    • 4.4 • 275 Ratings

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news.

    Covid-19: the Omicron wave is slowing - what lies on the other side?

    Covid-19: the Omicron wave is slowing - what lies on the other side?

    The coronavirus variant has spread across the UK at incredible speed – but there are signs that the wave may have reached its peak. Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian science correspondent Nicola Davis about what we can expect in the weeks and months to come, and whether a second ‘exit wave’ could be here in the summer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 10 min
    Why Theranos’s blood-testing claims were always too good to be true

    Why Theranos’s blood-testing claims were always too good to be true

    Last week, the tech CEO Elizabeth Holmes – once described as ‘the next Steve Jobs’ – was convicted of fraud, and could face decades in prison. Her now collapsed company, Theranos, promised to revolutionise medicine with a machine that could run hundreds of health tests on just a pinprick of blood. Those claims have since been exposed as false – but could they ever have been true? Madeleine Finlay speaks to the Guardian’s wealth correspondent, Rupert Neate, about Silicon Valley’s trial of the century, and pathologist Dr Benjamin Mazer about why Theranos’s vision seemed impossible from the start. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 15 min
    Is the world’s most important glacier on the brink of collapse?

    Is the world’s most important glacier on the brink of collapse?

    It’s been called the most important glacier in the world. The Thwaites glacier in Antarctica is the size of Florida, and contains enough water to raise sea levels by over half a metre. Over the past 30 years it has been melting at an increasing pace, and currently contributes 4% of annual global sea level rise. Ian Sample speaks to marine geophysicist Dr Rob Larter about a new research mission to the Thwaites glacier, the role of Boaty McBoatface and what it’s like to see a region melt away before your eyes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 11 min
    Why are so many people getting re-infected with Covid-19?

    Why are so many people getting re-infected with Covid-19?

    On Wednesday, 194,747 daily confirmed Covid cases were reported for the whole of the UK. But this doesn’t include all the people who have caught the virus for the second, or even third time. In fact, official figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland don’t include those who have had Covid before, despite warnings from scientists that up to 15% of Omicron cases could be reinfections. Madeleine Finlay speaks to the Guardian’s science editor Ian Sample about why reinfections are so high for Omicron, what these cases could tell us, and how it could affect public health measures in the future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 13 min
    Why is it so hard to lose that festive weight – and keep it off? – podcast

    Why is it so hard to lose that festive weight – and keep it off? – podcast

    New year resolutions often include eating more healthily, doing exercise and trying to shift some of the extra weight put on over Christmas. Yet research suggests the vast majority of people who do lose weight ultimately end up putting nearly all of it back on. So why is it so difficult? Madeleine Finlay speaks to health journalist and ex-neuroscientist David Cox on the science of metabolism, and what it means for our health. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 12 min
    From the archive: Carlo Rovelli on how to understand the quantum world (part two)

    From the archive: Carlo Rovelli on how to understand the quantum world (part two)

    From electrons behaving as both particles and waves to a cat in a box that’s both dead and alive, the consequences of quantum physics are decidedly weird. So strange, that over a century since its conception, scientists are still arguing about the best way to understand the theory. In the second of two episodes, Ian Sample sits down with the physicist Carlo Rovelli to discuss his ideas for explaining quantum physics, and how it affects our understanding of the world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
275 Ratings

275 Ratings

D20chick ,

Quality

Pacing is good, thoroughy enjoyable for those topics you already have an interest in.

ArlieLP ,

Science Weekly rules!

Science Weekly is one of my faves! I’ve learned so much from the show, and I’m always impressed by the depth and breadth of knowledge of the hosts and their guests. There is truly an episode that will benefit everyone - don’t miss it!

+estevez+ ,

Subscribed for 5 years. Covid commentary was poor. Unsubscribing.

Subscribed for 5 years. This podcast used to be one of my favourites when it was about science and nature. Fantastic source for information.
Not only was the Covid 19 commentary biased, it also wasn’t very good. Unsubscribing.

Top Podcasts In Science

Hidden Brain
Alie Ward
Jordan Harbinger
Neil deGrasse Tyson
Sam Harris
Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying

You Might Also Like

The Guardian
The Guardian
BBC Radio 4
The Guardian
BBC World Service
BBC World Service

More by itunesu_sunset

The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian