27 episodes

Interesting People Reading Poetry is a short, sound-rich podcast where artists and luminaries read a favorite poem and share what it means to them. Created by Andy & Brendan Stermer.

Interesting People Reading Poetry Stermer Brothers

    • Arts
    • 4.7 • 86 Ratings

Interesting People Reading Poetry is a short, sound-rich podcast where artists and luminaries read a favorite poem and share what it means to them. Created by Andy & Brendan Stermer.

    Painter Makoto Fujimura Reads T. S. Eliot

    Painter Makoto Fujimura Reads T. S. Eliot

    In this episode, Makoto Fujimura reads an excerpt from “Burnt Norton” by T. S. Eliot. Fujimura is a leading contemporary painter whose work fuses abstract expressionism with traditional Japanese painting styles. He is also the author of several books, including Art + Faith: A Theology of Making, out now from Yale University Press.









    https://open.spotify.com/episode/22qWbZwSKOZFHnuq7jxzb2









    T. S. Eliot was an influential modernist poet, playwright, and literary critic born in St. Louis in 1888. His late masterpiece, Four Quartets, is a collection of four linked poems partially inspired, in sound and structure, by Beethoven’s late string quartets. “Burnt Norton,” the first poem in the series, was written while Eliot was living in England in 1935.







    “Burnt Norton” by T. S. Eliot appears in Four Quartets, published by Ecco.







    Art + Faith: A Theology of Making by Makoto Fujimura is available now from Yale University Press. Keep up with Fujiumura – and explore his recent visual art – on his website, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.







    We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.







    Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

    • 18 min
    Journalist Theo Padnos Reads Arthur Rimbaud

    Journalist Theo Padnos Reads Arthur Rimbaud

    In this episode, Theo Padnos reads “The Drunken Boat” by Arthur Rimbaud. Padnos is an American writer and journalist. In 2012, he was kidnapped and held captive for two years by an Al Qaeda affiliate in Syria. His new book about the experience, Blindfold: A Memoir of Capture, Torture, and Enlightenment, was described in the Atlantic as "the best of the genre, profound, poetic, and powerful."









    https://open.spotify.com/episode/0E57BTo2FI63XOPVyjsqrZ









    Arthur Rimbaud was a French symbolist poet born in 1854. He composed “The Drunken Boat” when he was just 16 years old, and stopped writing poetry altogether in his early twenties.







    "The Drunken Boat" by Arthur Rimbaud, translated by Wallace Fowlie, appears in Rimbaud: Complete Works, Selected Letters, published by University of Chicago Press.







    Blindfold: A Memoir of Capture, Torture, and Enlightenment by Theo Padnos is available now from Simon & Schuster. To learn more about Theo's story, we also recommend the documentary Theo Who Lived directed by David Schisgall.







    We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.







    Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

    • 15 min
    Musician Hrishikesh Hirway Reads William Butler Yeats

    Musician Hrishikesh Hirway Reads William Butler Yeats

    In this episode, Hrishikesh Hirway reads "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" by William Butler Yeats. Hirway is the creator and host of several acclaimed podcasts, including Home Cooking (with Samin Nosrat), The West Wing Weekly (with Joshua Malina), and Song Exploder (which is now also a Netflix original series). On top of all that, Hirway manages a career as a composer and recording artist. At the beginning of this interview, you'll hear a short clip from his new single, "Between There and Here (feat. Yo-Yo Ma)."









    https://open.spotify.com/episode/7pu2x8Z3tA2Qzgl058WhGd









    "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" by William Butler Yeats was written in 1888 and included in his second collection, The Rose, published in 1893. You can likely find an assortment of Yeats' books at your local independent bookstore.







    Keep up with Hrishikesh Hirway on Twitter, Instagram, and at hrishikesh.co. Click here to stream, download, or watch the music video for "Between There and Here (feat. Yo-Yo Ma)." Click here to explore all of Hirway's many wonderful ongoing projects.







    We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.







    Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.







    This episode uses the sound "Banter Boys" by Nickleus from freesound, licensed under CC BY 3.0.

    • 15 min
    Editor Dawn Davis (Bon Appétit) Reads Edna St. Vincent Millay

    Editor Dawn Davis (Bon Appétit) Reads Edna St. Vincent Millay

    In this episode, Bon Appétit Editor-in-Chief Dawn Davis reads “Sonnet 171” by Edna St. Vincent Millay. Davis joined Bon Appétit in November 2020 following a long career in book publishing. Through her visionary work at Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins, Davis oversaw the publication of numerous influential best sellers — from “The Pursuit of Happyness” by Chris Gardner to “The Known World” by Edward P. Jones. 









    https://open.spotify.com/episode/4Ckf6fySDPqisv9vNzygx4









    Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet born in 1892. She became wildly popular during her lifetime — known for her passionate readings and bold social views — and achieved a special mastery over the sonnet.  







    “Sonnet 171” by Edna St. Vincent Millay appears in the volume Collected Poems, published by Harper Perennial Modern Classics. 







    Keep up with Dawn Davis on Instagram, and at bonappetit.com. 







    We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.







    Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

    • 10 min
    Songwriter Grian Chatten (Fontaines D.C.) Reads Gerard Manley Hopkins

    Songwriter Grian Chatten (Fontaines D.C.) Reads Gerard Manley Hopkins

    In this episode, Grian Chatten reads “The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins. Chatten is the frontman of the Irish post-punk band Fontaines D.C., recently described by NME as "the new heroes of the rock resurrection." The members of the group met while attending music college in Dublin and initially bonded over a shared love for Irish literature. Their second album, A Hero's Death, has been nominated for a 2021 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album.









    https://open.spotify.com/episode/31tSGmqny6OPHQ1YWagJmV









    Gerard Manley Hopkins was an English poet and Jesuit priest who spent the last years of his life as a professor of Greek and Latin at University College Dublin. His poems were not published until 30 years after his death in 1889.“The Windhover” by Gerard Manley Hopkins appears in Gerard Manley Hopkins: The Major Works, published by Oxford University Press.







    Keep up with Fontaines D.C. on Twitter, Instagram, and at fontainesdc.com. Click here to watch the music video for "Big," the song heard briefly at the beginning of this episode.







    We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.







    Subscribe on RadioPublic, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.

    • 14 min
    Photographer Alec Soth Reads Wallace Stevens

    Photographer Alec Soth Reads Wallace Stevens

    In this episode, Alec Soth reads "Of Modern Poetry" by Wallace Stevens. Soth is a photographer based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has published over twenty-five books and has been called a "living legend" and "one of the most important photographers working today" by the Washington Post.









    https://open.spotify.com/episode/6U9XgyQuamdVdEDw1P9ZNm









    Soth's recent photo book, I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating, is a stunning collection of portraits and interiors from around the world. Soth has described the collection as an attempt to "strip the [photographic] medium down to it's primary elements." The collection takes its title from an early poem by the American modernist Wallace Stevens, whose meditations on poetry and aesthetics have helped shape Soth's understanding of his own work."Of Modern Poetry" by Wallace Stevens appears in The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens, published by Vintage.







    Keep up with Alec Soth on Instagram and at alecsoth.com. His new collaborative book with C. Fausto Cabrera is available here for preorder.







    We feature one short listener poem at the end of every episode. To submit, call the Haiku Hotline at 612-440-0643 and read your poem after the beep. For the occasional prompt, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.







    Subscribe on RadioPublic, iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
86 Ratings

86 Ratings

swissmiss711 ,

Every episode a delight

This is a fantastic concept for a podcast, and it is incredibly well executed. I’ve been introduced to great poems, and hearing why each interesting person has chosen the poem offers meaningful context. A true joy every time I see a new episode.

IsaacCdM ,

Superb podcast

What a delightful podcast this is! The poems, the music, and the readers together make this a very special experience, both enjoyable and inspiring. I am very much looking forward to the next one!

LauraJ5 ,

Endless Pleasure

This podcast provided endless pleasure and joy. The daily small snippets of poetry while I walk inform my writing, thinking, and teaching. I also really appreciate hearing a variety of folx share poems important to them and explain how they “read” and apply these poems to their lives. Make more please.

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