100 episodes

Welcome to Jesuitical, a new podcast for young Catholics hosted by three young, lay editors at America—Olga Segura, Zac Davis and Ashley McKinless. Each episode we will bring you some of the top (and maybe more obscure) Catholic news of the week. We will also speak with a guest who offers a unique perspective on world events, culture or our faith. And we'll ask: Where do we find God in all this?

jesuitical America Media

    • Christianity
    • 4.8, 561 Ratings

Welcome to Jesuitical, a new podcast for young Catholics hosted by three young, lay editors at America—Olga Segura, Zac Davis and Ashley McKinless. Each episode we will bring you some of the top (and maybe more obscure) Catholic news of the week. We will also speak with a guest who offers a unique perspective on world events, culture or our faith. And we'll ask: Where do we find God in all this?

    Harry Potter, Soul Cycle and the Internet: say hello to America’s new religions. Ep. 142

    Harry Potter, Soul Cycle and the Internet: say hello to America’s new religions. Ep. 142

    You’ve heard of the “nones.” It seems like every week there is a new book, article or survey trying to explain the increasingly large segment of millennials and Gen-Zers who check “none” when asked about their religious affiliation. Tara Isabella Burton, a theologian, author and journalist, is less interested in what these young people are leaving behind (institutional religion) than in how they are finding or making their own meaning. From Harry Potter fan forums to SoulCycle, Crossfit and witchcraft, Americans are forming niche communities that play the role traditionally filled by churches.
    We ask Tara about the origins of the trend, the dangers of picking and choosing our own beliefs and rituals and whether institutional religion has a chance of reaching what she calls religion “Remixers.”
    In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis celebrates a Mass with 100 worshippers for the centenary of St. John Paul II’s birth—the first large gathering at St. Peter’s Basilica since the coronavirus shut down churches in Italy. Next, we bring on America’s national correspondent, Michael O’Loughlin, to talk about the reopening of churches in the United States. Finally, we ask: Should Michael Jordan be a (secular) saint? Zac makes the case for hagiography in the church and the world of sports.
    Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week!

    Links from the show:
    Pope Francis celebrates St. John Paul II centenary: ‘God sent his people a prophet.’
    U.S. Catholic dioceses release plans for reopening churches
    Michael Jordan and the problem (and necessity) of hagiography
    Strange Rites: New Religions for a Godless World
    Why you (yes you) should care about theology
    What’s on tap?
    Old Fashioned’s

    • 54 min
    What Pope Francis wants the world to look like post Covid-19

    What Pope Francis wants the world to look like post Covid-19

    Countries around the world are fighting the Covid-19 pandemic and Vatican City State is no exception. But since the coronavirus shut down Italy in early March, Pope Francis has pointed toward the world to come...on earth.
    The host of America’s “Inside the Vatican” podcast, Colleen Dulle, joins Ashley, Zac and Vivian to explain what Pope Francis has done to respond to the pandemic at the Vatican while calling on humanity to collaborate in building a new world that is more equitable and sustainable.
    Colleen also discusses the visionary life of Madeleine Delbrêl, “the French Dorothy Day,” as she is sometimes described. Colleen is currently working on a biography of the 20th century French activist, poet, mystic and visionary of lay leadership in the Catholic Church whom she describes as “the saint for Jesuitical listeners.”
    We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you.
    Links from the show: 

    Subscribe to “Inside the Vatican” on Spotify, Apple, Google
    Articles by Colleen Dulle:

    Who is Madeleine Delbrêl—the “French Dorothy Day” Pope Francis made venerable this weekend?

    Subway mysticism: How Madeleine Delbrêl transformed my commute

    • 29 min
    The first Catholic high school for teens struggling with substance abuse. Ep. 141

    The first Catholic high school for teens struggling with substance abuse. Ep. 141

    For teens struggling with substance abuse and addiction, the typical pressures of high school can spill over into the realm of disastrous. Recovery high schools—with smaller class sizes, counseling and sober social activities—are designed to support students in recovery. The first recovery high school opened in 1979; today there are over 40 nationwide. But before Kolbe Academy, which opened last year in Bethlehem, Pa., none of the recovery schools were Catholic.
    This week we chat with the school’s (Jesuit-educated) founding principal, John Petruzzelli, about what makes Kolbe Academy unique and why he thinks it’s important for the church to be involved in supporting students in recovery.
    In Signs of the Times, we talk about Ashley’s feature article on Wyoming Catholic College and look at how Covid-19 has affected men and women religious and other vulnerable elderly populations.
    As always, thanks for listening and supporting our show. We’ll see you soon.
    Links from the show: 
    Kolbe Academy
    A visit to the rural Catholic college that has 171 students, 12 horses and zero textbooks
    Supreme Court tackles clash of Catholic schools, ex-teachers
    SOAR!
    What’s on tap?
    Water, carbonated (Ashley) and not (Zac). 

    • 41 min
    Living like monks in quarantine

    Living like monks in quarantine

    In every age there are a small number of Catholics who intentionally isolate themselves from society to serve God and the church through lives of “prayer and labor.”. They’re called monks.
    Gregory Hillis, an associate professor of theology at Bellarmine University in Louisville, Ky., knows one community of monks particularly well: the Cistercian monks at the Abbey of Gethsemani. In a recent essay for America, he shares some wisdom from the monks for living in solitude during a time of pandemic.
    Greg joins Ashley, Zac and Vivian in this bonus episode to explore the rigorous yet transforming practices of monastic life, the power of silence and letting go of a false sense of control over our lives. They also discuss the most famous monk of Gethsemani Abbey, the writer and mystic Thomas Merton.
    We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you.
    Links from the show: 
    “We’re all monks now,” by Gregory Hillis

    Books by Thomas Merton referenced by Greg Hillis:
    "The Intimate Merton: His Life from His Journals"

    "New Seeds of Contemplation"

    • 33 min
    How will the Catholic Church change after the coronavirus pandemic? Ep. 140

    How will the Catholic Church change after the coronavirus pandemic? Ep. 140

    A 25-minute conversation between President Trump and hundreds of bishops and other Catholic leaders sparked an intense debate about the right way for Catholic leaders to engage in politics. While the conference call got a lot of attention, it is just one story among many affecting the church in the United States, and as the national correspondent for Crux, Chris White has to try to cover them all.
    We talk to Chris about how he broke the story of the conference call, what the church might look like after the coronavirus pandemic and how he understands the relationship between his identities as a “Catholic” and a “journalist.”
    In our weekly survey of Catholic news, we highlight the Franciscan spiritual master Richard Rohr’s cameo on “The Simpsons” and a study examining the efficacy of prayer on patients recovering from Covid-19. We also discuss the disproportionate effect that the coronavirus pandemic is having on black Americans.   
    Links from the show:
    Richard Rohr on The Simpsons
    Clinical Study Considers The Power Of Prayer To Combat COVID-19
    U.S. Bishop Chairmen Issue Statement Urging State and National Leaders to Examine African American Communities by COVID-19
    Trump says he’s ‘best president in history of the Church’ in call with Catholic leaders
    Chris White on Twitter

    What’s on tap?
    Margaritas (kind of)

    • 40 min
    Father James Martin on praying in quarantine

    Father James Martin on praying in quarantine

    When the Covid-19 pandemic quarantined America’s editor at large, James Martin, S.J., he felt he had to offer some spiritual solace to people struggling with fear, isolation and uncertainty. So, he logged onto Facebook from his room in the America House Jesuit community and went live.
    Father Martin’s daily “faith sharings,” as he calls them, reach tens of thousands of people around the world who are cooped up at home because of the pandemic. They include Scripture readings and his personal reflections, scholarly commentary and live Q&A, including prayer requests.
    “Most of it is fun and upbeat. But in the comments from time to time you’ll see, ‘My father just died of coronavirus,’” Father Martin says. “It’s a sad time for so many people, but they’re desiring a sense of community, and that’s why so many people have tuned in.”
    Ashley, Zac and Vivian discuss with Father Martin how to pray in quarantine and what life is like in a small Jesuit community in Midtown Manhattan. 
    We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you.
    Links from the show: 
    Daily faith sharing with James Martin, S.J.
    James Martin's weekly newsletter
    “The Examen”, a podcast for daily prayer hosted by James Martin, S.J.
    “Jesus, A Pilgrimage” by James Martin, S.J.

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
561 Ratings

561 Ratings

yoopersunny ,

My Consoliation

Jesuitical has become a constant consolation in my life where there has been a lot of desolations. I look forward to each new episode! Thanks for all your hard work!

David J. V. ,

Favorite Catholic young adult podcast

I’ve been a Jesuitical listener since episode 1 and more than just a podcast, it really has created a community. Every conversation on the show feels like one that I’m a part of. The hosts are excellent and their views are always smart and thoughtful.

APS717 ,

Fun Insight to Catholic Life

What a great addition to my podcast library. I love their playfulness, honesty, and introspection to catholicism. The signs of the times keeps me caught up in the Catholic news and their interviews are non-judgemental, love it!

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