13 min

Jim Dumont - After the Fourth Prophecy -- Finding a Way Back to Traditional Ways Religica

    • Spirituality

In this podcast, Jim Dumont discusses the prophecies of his people and how they predicted the destruction of the water and earth. He believes that everyone can learn from the traditions of indigenous people to change their ways of thinking in order to save the earth. Jim Dumont is Onaubinisay (Walks Above the Ground), an Ojibway-Anishinabe of the Waubezhayshee (Marten) Clan. Since 1970, he has pursued the cultural and spiritual roots of the traditional Anishinabe Way of Life. He retired in 2000 as Professor of Native Studies at the University of Sudbury of Laurentian University. Today, Jim teaches in the Indigenous Masters Program with the Seven Generations Institute.Steve Wilhelm recently retired from his 34-year career as a journalist, writing mainly about aerospace, advanced manufacturing and international trade. Steve has taught meditation and Buddhism through Eastside Insight Meditation since 2000. He also edits Northwest Dharma News and serves on the board of the Tibetan Nuns Project. He has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado.The Religica Theolab is now at home at The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle UniversityMore from The Religica Theolab at https://religica.orgMore from The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle University at https://www.seattleu.edu/thecenter/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Religica.org/Twitter: https://twitter.com/religicaYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPuwufds6gAu2u6xmm8SBuwSoundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-religicaSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3CZwIO4uGP1voqiVpYdMas?si=0k2-TSmwTkuTQC2rgdGObQApple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/religica/id1448005061?mt=2The Religica Theolab is a comprehensive online platform at the axis of religion and society that provides non-sectarian, coherent, integrated and accessible awareness about the role of religion in society, with a focus on strengthening local communities.

In this podcast, Jim Dumont discusses the prophecies of his people and how they predicted the destruction of the water and earth. He believes that everyone can learn from the traditions of indigenous people to change their ways of thinking in order to save the earth. Jim Dumont is Onaubinisay (Walks Above the Ground), an Ojibway-Anishinabe of the Waubezhayshee (Marten) Clan. Since 1970, he has pursued the cultural and spiritual roots of the traditional Anishinabe Way of Life. He retired in 2000 as Professor of Native Studies at the University of Sudbury of Laurentian University. Today, Jim teaches in the Indigenous Masters Program with the Seven Generations Institute.Steve Wilhelm recently retired from his 34-year career as a journalist, writing mainly about aerospace, advanced manufacturing and international trade. Steve has taught meditation and Buddhism through Eastside Insight Meditation since 2000. He also edits Northwest Dharma News and serves on the board of the Tibetan Nuns Project. He has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado.The Religica Theolab is now at home at The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle UniversityMore from The Religica Theolab at https://religica.orgMore from The Center for Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement at Seattle University at https://www.seattleu.edu/thecenter/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Religica.org/Twitter: https://twitter.com/religicaYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPuwufds6gAu2u6xmm8SBuwSoundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-religicaSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3CZwIO4uGP1voqiVpYdMas?si=0k2-TSmwTkuTQC2rgdGObQApple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/religica/id1448005061?mt=2The Religica Theolab is a comprehensive online platform at the axis of religion and society that provides non-sectarian, coherent, integrated and accessible awareness about the role of religion in society, with a focus on strengthening local communities.

13 min