2 hr 9 min

Joyce Jackson Voices of Oklahoma

    • Society & Culture

Joyce Jackson was in Junior High School when she became part of the Katz Drugstore sit-in in 1958, the beginning of a movement that contributed to race relations reform in Oklahoma.

Joyce was the first black woman on television in Oklahoma at KOCO 5, Oklahoma City, becoming an award-winning broadcast journalist, producer and talk show host.

In 1982 she began a career in the Oklahoma Department of Justice as a public relations officer until 1997 when she left the agency to become the Communications Director for the Illinois Department of Corrections. She returned to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections as the Executive Communications Administrator in 2005.

Joyce also worked as a professional model for 20 years and was the owner of a modeling/charm school.

She retired from the Oklahoma Department of Corrections in 2014 after 24 years of service.

See more on our website: https://voicesofoklahoma.com/interviews/jackson-joyce/

Joyce Jackson was in Junior High School when she became part of the Katz Drugstore sit-in in 1958, the beginning of a movement that contributed to race relations reform in Oklahoma.

Joyce was the first black woman on television in Oklahoma at KOCO 5, Oklahoma City, becoming an award-winning broadcast journalist, producer and talk show host.

In 1982 she began a career in the Oklahoma Department of Justice as a public relations officer until 1997 when she left the agency to become the Communications Director for the Illinois Department of Corrections. She returned to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections as the Executive Communications Administrator in 2005.

Joyce also worked as a professional model for 20 years and was the owner of a modeling/charm school.

She retired from the Oklahoma Department of Corrections in 2014 after 24 years of service.

See more on our website: https://voicesofoklahoma.com/interviews/jackson-joyce/

2 hr 9 min

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