50 episodes

Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.

Latino USA NPR

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9, 3.1K Ratings

Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.

    Portrait Of: Arca

    Portrait Of: Arca

    Alejandra Ghersi, the experimental musician from Venezuela known as Arca, has been at the forefront of a movement that has pushed the boundaries of the pop music landscape. Since dropping her first mixtapes in 2011, she has produced album after album of boundary-defying music, and has been tapped as a producer for Kanye West, Bjork and FKA twigs. In this episode Arca talks with Maria Hinojosa about growing up in Venezuela, her philosophies around music, and about finding herself as a trans woman.

    • 28 min
    Bobby Sanabria Reimagines West Side Story

    Bobby Sanabria Reimagines West Side Story

    Growing up as a Nuyorican kid in the Bronx, Bobby Sanabria first watched "West Side Story" in the movie theaters, on the 10th anniversary of the film's release. "I was mesmerized," said the Latin Jazz drummer and composer. In 2017, the Broadway classic celebrated its 60th anniversary and to honor this milestone, Sanabria re-envisioned what Latino New York City actually sounds like. The result was his album, "West Side Story Reimagined." Maria Hinojosa talks to the drummer and composer about what the iconic musical means to him and how he paid tribute to its legacy.

    This story originally aired in September of 2018.

    • 19 min
    I'm Not Dead

    I'm Not Dead

    In the early 70s, Miguel Angel Villavicencio was focused on making his most ambitious dream possible: to become a famous singer in Bolivia and across the world. And he was halfway there—his love songs were on the radio and he was appearing on TV. But to take his singing career truly international, he needed money. So he decided to work for Bolivia's most powerful drug cartel in the 80s—a major supplier for Pablo Escobar. Choosing this path would lead him on a journey of self-destruction, unexpected betrayal and finally, redemption.

    This story originally aired in January of 2019.

    • 34 min
    How Brazil Became The Epicenter Of COVID-19

    How Brazil Became The Epicenter Of COVID-19

    Brazil recorded its first death from COVID-19 on March 17th and by mid-June the country was the world leader in daily deaths. Overall, Brazil is only behind the United States both in the number of cases and deaths due to coronavirus. But Jair Bolsonaro, the country's right-wing nationalist president, continues to be dismissive about the threat posed by the virus. In this episode, we find out why Brazil, one of the largest economies in the world and a nation often in the forefront of innovative public health treatments, has failed to combat the pandemic.

    • 27 min
    DACA Stands, But The Future Is Anything But Certain

    DACA Stands, But The Future Is Anything But Certain

    On Thursday, June 18th, the Supreme Court issued a ruling that upheld the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. This comes over two years after the Trump administration moved to eliminate the program. About 700,000 people are currently enrolled in DACA, which grants temporary stays of deportation to undocumented immigrants who moved to the U.S. as children. As DACA recipients and supporters celebrate this win, they're also looking to the future. DACA could still be challenged by this administration. Meanwhile, many are calling for comprehensive immigration reform and a path to citizenship for both DACA recipients and the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. today.

    • 31 min
    Resistance And Loss In The Age Of COVID-19 With Edwidge Danticat

    Resistance And Loss In The Age Of COVID-19 With Edwidge Danticat

    According to Haitian American author Edwidge Danticat, stories are a way of finding inspiration and comfort during the times we're living through. Her award-winning writing portrays the immigrant experience, Haitian American identity, and loss. In conversation with Maria Hinojosa, Danticat dives into the history of resistance to the police violence that was all around her as a young adult in New York City, the loss of her own uncle who died at the hands of immigration authorities, and how she's making sense of the current moment.

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
3.1K Ratings

3.1K Ratings

otitaboti3 ,

A Team Full of Heroes

Maria Hinojosa and her team are beacons of light in our media landscape. Thank you for your consistent high quality work!

masdelinda ,

Broadening the Latinx narrative

I appreciate this show’s commitment to expanding the worldview of what it means to be Latinx both in this country and across borders. As a mixed race Latina, I applaud them for addressing issues of race and other inequities head-on both in the larger community and also in within the Latinx community. The music is also a great addition to this podcast.

EGarces ,

Latinocidad?

No creo que la palabra Latinocidad o Latinosidad es correcto, anglosajónismo quizá?

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