157 episodes

The Term is a podcast from Law360 for the busy U.S. Supreme Court watcher. Give us about 15 minutes each week and we'll catch you up on all the big action at the nation's highest court, along with a list of what to watch in the coming sessions. Hosts senior Supreme Court reporter Jimmy Hoover in Washington, D.C. and editor-at-large Natalie Rodriguez in New York City cut through a busy docket to focus on the key cases and developments everyone will be talking about.

Law360's The Term - News & Analysis on the Supreme Court Law360 - Legal News & Analysis

    • News
    • 4.4 • 133 Ratings

The Term is a podcast from Law360 for the busy U.S. Supreme Court watcher. Give us about 15 minutes each week and we'll catch you up on all the big action at the nation's highest court, along with a list of what to watch in the coming sessions. Hosts senior Supreme Court reporter Jimmy Hoover in Washington, D.C. and editor-at-large Natalie Rodriguez in New York City cut through a busy docket to focus on the key cases and developments everyone will be talking about.

    United Or Divided? Interpreting The Supreme Court Term

    United Or Divided? Interpreting The Supreme Court Term

    Another U.S. Supreme Court season is in the books, and while the final week of opinions featured some supermajority holdings along party lines on divisive issues like affirmative action and gay rights, we also saw a number of decisions with unexpected lineups on issues like voting rights and religious freedom. This week, the hosts of both Pro Say and The Term team up to discuss the surprising unanimity we saw in many of the justices’ opinions, the impact we should expect following some of the blockbuster opinions handed down in the final week, and finally what, if anything, we can take away from the ethics conversation that dominated the headlines throughout the term. 

    • 45 min
    The Court Closes With LGBTQ Rights And Biden Debt Plan

    The Court Closes With LGBTQ Rights And Biden Debt Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court wrapped up its term on Friday with a pair of monumental opinions. First, the court ruled that a Christian website designer in Colorado can refuse services for same-sex weddings on account of her protected free speech rights, and in a second case struck down President Joe Biden’s ambitious student loan forgiveness plan. We welcome Holland & Hart partner Christopher Jackson as a guest to give us the highlights from the blockbuster 303 Creative v. Elenis decision before digging further into why the justices said the Biden Administration lacked the authority to forgive more than $400 billion in federal loans.  

    • 23 min
    The Supreme Court Guts Affirmative Action

    The Supreme Court Guts Affirmative Action

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday dismantled affirmative action in a 6-3 majority opinion which held that race-based admissions policies at Harvard and the University of North Carolina violated the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment. Law360 senior Boston courts reporter Chris Villani joins us to discuss the monumental ruling and its sweeping implications for academia and a potentially broad swath of the workforce. Also this week, we welcome Columbia law professor and voting rights expert Richard Briffault to discuss Tuesday’s blockbuster election law opinion.

    • 29 min
    The Court Delivers Its Immigration Blockbusters

    The Court Delivers Its Immigration Blockbusters

    The U.S. Supreme Court weighed in on a pair of important immigration questions Friday morning, deciding in one opinion to uphold a federal law that makes it a crime to encourage illegal immigration, and in another opinion reviving the Biden Administration’s selective deportation policy over challenges from the state of Texas and others. On this week’s episode of The Term we welcome Law360 senior immigration reporter Britain Eakin who spent the day getting reactions from the immigration law community about what these opinions mean moving forward. Also this week, two big administrative law rulings related to habeas challenges and arbitration proceedings, as well as denied water rights for Navajo Nation.

    • 20 min
    A Victory For Native American Sovereignty

    A Victory For Native American Sovereignty

    The Indian Child Welfare Act, a 1978 federal law designed to stop the state and federal practice of removing Native American children from their communities, survived the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday after a 7-2 majority held that the law does not illegally tread on state authority in regulating child custody programs. The justices stopped short of deciding the question of whether the law discriminated against non-native parents, but the opinion was hailed nonetheless as a major victory for Native American rights. On this week’s episode of The Term, we welcome Law360 reporter Caleb Symons who has been closely tracking this case to explain the majority opinion and the implications it has for Native American sovereignty.

    • 13 min
    The Voting Rights Act Survives. What’s Next?

    The Voting Rights Act Survives. What’s Next?

    In one of the blockbuster voting rights cases of the Supreme Court term, a five-justice majority on Thursday concluded that an Alabama congressional map drawn following the 2020 census diluted Black voter representation in violation of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act. 
    Alabama’s electoral map packed a large number of Black voters into a single district, and the state argued it could not be redrawn to add a second majority-Black district without making race the primary consideration, which it said violated the Constitution. But the majority rejected that argument and instead affirmed a lower court’s finding that Alabama could have done so. 
    On this week’s episode of The Term, we welcome Jenner & Block partner Sam Hirsch, an expert in voting rights and redistricting litigation, to explain the stakes of the case and implications of the opinion moving forward. We also discuss a major trademark ruling in favor of Jack Daniels, and the latest financial disclosures from the justices.

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
133 Ratings

133 Ratings

spjr727 ,

Obviously liberal hosts but good coverage overall

^^^

natlratlsecfan ,

Light on substance

Take with a grain of salt, I follow the court pretty aggressively and often times find when listening to these episodes that I’ve picked up “nothing new.” If this is your sole source of SCOTUS info and you don’t care to get much beyond summary headlines, this pod is fine. If you want detailed or well thought analysis, I suggest investing time and effort elsewhere

Dragoon 149 ,

It’s a middle-of-the-road podcast…

…despite what some may claim here, the hosts of the Term give pretty sterile and politics-free news on the goings-on at the Court. Some people in these reviews rant and rave about the hosts and their “liberal myopic tyrannical worldview”; I am right-of-center myself and I can attest that this is not the case. The aforementioned reviewers strike me as being too far gone to the point of not being able to hear objective reporting without shrieking about ~LiBeRaL mEdIa BiAs~. I suspect the hosts’ rather restrained style when approaching hot-button issues is what has drawn ire for some; personally, I appreciate it. When the 5% on both extremes can’t handle what you’re saying, you’re doing things right if you ask me.

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