300 episodes

Broad answers to specific business legal questions (with multiple disclaimers), Legally Sound | Smart Business is a podcast geared towards small business owners. Hosted by attorneys Nasir N. Pasha and Matt Staub of Pasha Law, Legally Sound | Smart Business touches on a variety of topics, usually from a legal point of view, with an occasional laugh.

Legally Sound Smart Business by Pasha Law PC Nasir and Matt from Pasha Law

    • News
    • 4.8 • 18 Ratings

Broad answers to specific business legal questions (with multiple disclaimers), Legally Sound | Smart Business is a podcast geared towards small business owners. Hosted by attorneys Nasir N. Pasha and Matt Staub of Pasha Law, Legally Sound | Smart Business touches on a variety of topics, usually from a legal point of view, with an occasional laugh.

    Law in the Digital Age: Exploring the Legal Intricacies of Artificial Intelligence [e323]

    Law in the Digital Age: Exploring the Legal Intricacies of Artificial Intelligence [e323]

    In this episode, Nasir Pasha and Matt Staub explore the legal implications of Artificial Intelligence in the business world. They delve into the most talked-about issue of 2023: AI and its impact on the legal landscape. Although AI isn't necessarily a new topic, it has many unanswered questions in the legal world. Nasir and Matt discuss the dangers and challenges of AI, touching on issues from copyright law to the use of AI in the workplace.







    Diving deep into the privacy implications of AI usage and discussing the Samsung incident where data leaked through ChatGPT. They explore the intricacies of copyright ownership in AI-generated content, discussing a recent ruling that AI lacks human authorship. Nasir and Matt expands to cover data leaks in various contexts, emphasizing the importance of implementing rigorous policies as AI tools become increasingly integrated into diverse industries.

    • 57 min
    Unraveling the Workforce: Navigating the Aftermath of Mass Layoffs [e322]

    Unraveling the Workforce: Navigating the Aftermath of Mass Layoffs [e322]

    In this episode, Attorney Nasir Pasha and Attorney Matt Staub delve deep into the complexities of mass layoffs and offer valuable insights, real-life examples, and practical advice to employers grappling with the aftermath of such challenging situations.







    Nasir and Matt emphasize the critical importance of effective communication when executing mass layoffs. They stress the need for meticulous planning and the development of a clear communication strategy. Drawing from both successful and problematic examples, the hosts highlight the significance of involving HR professionals, legal advisors, and financial experts to ensure a comprehensive and empathetic approach.







    A key legal consideration discussed is the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act. Nasir and Matt provide a comprehensive overview of the federal WARN Act requirements, emphasizing that employers with at least a hundred full-time employees must provide a 60-day notice to affected employees under certain circumstances. They also shed light on state-specific WARN Act regulations, including California's lower employee threshold.







    Discrimination in mass layoffs is another critical area examined. They tackle the challenges associated with making fair termination decisions in larger organizations, stressing the need to establish objective criteria such as job performance and seniority while avoiding subjective factors that may give rise to discrimination claims. Nasir and Matt underscore the importance of maintaining proper documentation and objective evaluations to support termination decisions.







    Severance packages, an integral part of mass layoffs, receive significant attention. Nasir and Matt explore the benefits of offering severance, particularly the release of employer liability. While providing general guidelines, such as one week of salary per year of service, severance agreements for executive-level employees may differ based on individual employment contracts.







    Full Podcast Transcript

    NASIR: Fifty-year low of unemployment.

    MATT: The Goldman Sachs CEO had roughly 3,200 employees terminated.

    NASIR: Hopefully it’s not spontaneous.

    MATT: You know, if someone’s going to be upset, they’re going to be upset.

    NASIR: Matt, you’re right. It’s relatively simple to figure out whether you trigger a WARN Act or not.

    MATT: Nothing good is probably going to happen.

    This is Legally Sound Smart Business where your hosts – Nasir Pasha and Matt Staub – cover business in the news and add their awesome legal twist. Legally Sound Smart Business is a podcast brought to you by Pasha Law PC – a law firm representing your business in California, Illinois, New York, and Texas. Here are your hosts, Nasir Pasha and Matt Staub.

    NASIR: All right. Welcome. Fifty-year low of unemployment. That’s what we’re going to talk about today; also, the other side of the coin which is all the layoffs that are going on in the tech sector but especially in the last few months here in 2023, and in particular how to handle those layoffs from a legal perspective.

    MATT: Yes, it’s no secret to anyone that’s been paying attention to the news. There’s been a great amount of layoffs – mass layoffs particularly in larger companies. It felt like this was a pretty appropriate topic from the legal standpoint on both ends of the employer-and-employee spectrum to see what exactly is out there and what people can do.

    NASIR: Right. We’ve been debating whether to cover this particular topic because we’re in a very weird economy right now – at least from my perspective. Despite the unemployment being at a 50-year low, we are seeing lots of news about layoffs.

    So far, it seems to be a lot in the tech sector, but one of the reasons we wanted to cover this is I think we anticipate that this may start expanding a bi...

    • 45 min
    Return to the Office vs. Remote: What Can Employers Legally Enforce? [e321]

    Return to the Office vs. Remote: What Can Employers Legally Enforce? [e321]

    As the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the globe, businesses scrambled to adapt to the new reality it presented. In this blog post, we dive into the case of Goldman Sachs, a financial services giant, to examine their response to the crisis and the lessons other businesses can learn from their return-to-office strategy. From prioritizing employee safety and well-being to navigating legal concerns and addressing accommodations, this comprehensive look at the company's pandemic journey offers valuable insights for businesses facing similar challenges. Be sure to listen to our podcast episode on the same topic for an even deeper exploration of Goldman Sachs' pandemic response and return-to-office experience.















    The COVID-19 pandemic brought unprecedented challenges to businesses worldwide, forcing many to adapt their working environments rapidly. One such company was Goldman Sachs, a global financial services powerhouse. This blog post will take a closer look at the company's response to the pandemic, focusing on their return-to-office strategy and the issues they faced along the way.







    Early Response to the Pandemic (March 2020)







    In March 2020, the US started to see a surge in COVID-19 cases, with New York City becoming an early epicenter of the outbreak. Goldman Sachs, headquartered in the city, responded by sending their employees to work from home. CEO David Solomon emphasized the company's commitment to employee safety and support for not only their direct employees but also the support staff that keep their offices running.







    The Return-to-Office Plan (September 2020)







    In March 2020, the US started to see a surge in COVID-19 cases, with New York City becoming an early epicenter of the outbreak. Goldman Sachs, headquartered in the city, responded by sending their employees to work from home. CEO David Solomon emphasized the company's commitment to employee safety and support for not only their direct employees but also the support staff that keep their offices running.







    The Return-to-Office Plan (September 2020)







    In September 2020, before vaccines were widely available, there was a lull in COVID-19 cases. Seizing the opportunity, Solomon announced a return-to-office plan for employees, implementing a rotational schedule. This decision was considered controversial at the time, as many companies had not yet considered bringing employees back on-site.







    Legal Considerations and Employee Concerns







    Throughout the pandemic, businesses faced numerous legal questions and employee concerns, such as potential liability if an employee contracted COVID-19 at work, and whether employees could be forced to return to the office. While there were some exceptions, such as religious or disability-related concerns, employees were generally required to comply with their employer's return-to-work policies.







    Accommodations and Adjustments







    As more information about the virus became available, businesses, including Goldman Sachs, had to consider potential accommodations for employees with health concerns. Employers could provide personal protective equipment (PPE), vaccinations, or alternative working arrangements, such as separate offices or continued remote work, to accommodate employees with health concerns or disabilities.







    Employers should feel more comfortable bringing their employees back to the office as the situation continues to evolve, considering the legal landscape and the current state of the pandemic. It is essential to be aware of different state labor laws and how they may impact employment policies if employees have moved during the pandemic. Additionally,

    • 36 min
    Explaining the Hans Niemann Chess Lawsuit v. Magnus Carlsen [e320]

    Explaining the Hans Niemann Chess Lawsuit v. Magnus Carlsen [e320]

    https://player.vimeo.com/video/765042547?h=00370d406a&badge=0&autopause=0&player_id=0&app_id=58479

    When one of the world’s most famous chess players is accused of cheating, everyone wants to know how it happened. Hans Niemann is suing Magnus Carlsen, Chess.com, and others for $100m in a defamation lawsuit. There are many layers to this lawsuit and Nasir breaks down the legal aspect of one of the biggest cheating scandals in chess history.







    Full Podcast TranscriptNASIR: Finally, my two favorite worlds have collided – both the law and the chess – right here at Memorial Park in Houston, Texas. Windy day. We have some background noise – ambient noise.

    What are the two worlds that collided? Well, Hans Neimann has sued Magnus Carlsen for defamation in one of the biggest chess scandals in history.

    ZACHARY: And Chess.com, right?

    NASIR: Chess.com and a streamer called Hikaru Nakamura.

    ZACHARY: Oh. I didn’t know that.

    NASIR: I actually watch him, too.

    Anyway, these are my two worlds because, of course, I’m an attorney. Zach is a paralegal with us. Him and I – for those of you that don’t know – we play chess pretty much every Friday.

    ZACHARY: Yes, certainly.

    NASIR: I don’t know. What’s our win-lose ratio?

    ZACHARY: You will be modest and say that I sometimes beat you more than I do, but you certainly beat me more often.

    NASIR: Well, the problem is I’m the boss. I feel like that’s part of it because I hate to lose. I can’t stand it. Also, we also wager whether we leave early or not. Usually, it’s whether I win or lose, we leave early – on those days, at least.

    Yes, biggest scandal probably to hit chess history.

    • 50 min
    California v. Texas: Which is Better for Business? [313]

    California v. Texas: Which is Better for Business? [313]

    Through a five-round championship bout, Matt travels to Texas from California to determine which state is better for business. Will it be a knockout with a clear winner or will it go to the scorecards?

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Buyers vs. Sellers: Negotiating Mergers & Acquisitions [e319]

    Buyers vs. Sellers: Negotiating Mergers & Acquisitions [e319]

    Whether you are buying or selling a business, the transaction goes through the same steps. However, they are viewed from different perspectives. Sellers may not want to fully disclose all the blind spots while Buyers will want otherwise. Nasir and Matt battle it out in this Buyer vs. Seller to determine who has the advantage!







    Round 1: Prepare to Negotiate - Letter of Intent







    When it comes to selling a business, some of the most critical work is done before you even make your first phone call. A letter of intent serves as a way for both parties to get on the same page and lays the groundwork for what each of you can expect from the other.









    https://www.youtube.com/embed/t4KVprJ9m94









    Round 2: Due Diligence and the No Shop Periods







    Buying or selling a business is a complex process. It's not just about talking about purchasing or selling the company's assets. For prospective buyers, it’s important to understand that buying a business is not all about the numbers. Thorough due diligence of all facets of your target company is necessary for you to make a meaningful offer.









    https://www.youtube.com/embed/5tK8uMHZArQ









    Round 3: Warranties and Representations







    Representations and warranties are the biggest reason that verbal agreements are so risky. Representations and warranties set a floor on the quality of the purchase, define each party's responsibilities, inform both parties how they can end the deal, and help structure payments.









    https://www.youtube.com/embed/QoxOnUEGdxs









    Round 4: It's Closing Time







    Signed, sealed, and delivered. The signing and closing of a transaction is often the most critical stage in the process. It can either be smooth or cause delays that could undermine the transactions.









    https://youtu.be/AgEtBno39YA









    “Full Podcast TranscriptNASIR: All right. Welcome! We are talking buyers and sellers, acquisitions, mergers. It’s a lot more than what you would think.

    MATT: That depends on what side you’re on.

    NASIR: Everyone in business ends up at this point at one point in time.

    MATT: It’s a very interesting dynamic. This is kind of a very weird interaction.

    This is Legally Sound Smart Business where your hosts – Nasir Pasha and Matt Staub – cover business in the news and add their awesome legal twist. Legally Sound Smart Business is a podcast brought to you by Pasha Law PC – a law firm representing your business in California, Illinois, New York, and Texas. Here are your hosts, Nasir Pasha and Matt Staub.

    NASIR: All right. Welcome! We are talking buyers and sellers, acquisitions, mergers. We are going, once again, head-to-head – Matt and I – taking different perspectives. This time around, we’re not flipping a coin. Matt and I discussed it prior, and I am taking the buyer’s point of view.

    MATT: That means I’ll be taking the seller’s point of view.

    NASIR: That would be weird if you also took the buyer’s point of view, so that’s good.

    MATT: Well, obviously, there’s not a lot of positive results from the pandemic, but one thing I’ve noticed that has happened that’s been a positive is there have been a lot of transactions between companies – like you said, mergers and acquisitions, things of that nature.

    We’ve seen quite an uptick of representing buyers and sellers in those sorts of transactions just because of the nature of it. I don’t know necessarily if they were more motivated and what the actual reasoning was, but – at least in my opinion – there’s been an increase in those sorts of transactions.

    NASIR: Absolutely. If you looked at the stats on M&A in general,

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

7rmason7 ,

Love the show

Thanks

E926384783383 ,

THEY DON’T UTILIZE REFERENCES

I am an independent contractor with door dash and I work diligently to fulfill my food delivery orders and am good at my job. After listening to these two hosts talk about ONLY their personal experiences and failing to utilize other sources and references, they claimed that it was more timely to show up to a restaurant and order than it was to order online or by phone for pickup- this makes literally no sense at all!

Food delivery service restaurants and delivery people work very hard at what they do and I am in college and I am taught to utilize valid sources and I think this podcast should do the same.

untwistedhelix ,

Current legal topics discussed w/ a twist of humor

Great podcast! I love that topics are current, concise but still discussed in depth and from different perspectives.

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