65 episodes

Living African is a podcast that sparks hard conversations that challenge questionable cultural and societal norms, which threaten the wellbeing of the African community. The host, Anyoh Fombad, features various African guests who share their stories from heart-wrenching to exciting experiences growing up in Africa and the diaspora. By normalizing these open discussions, Anyoh hopes to encourage Africans to show their strength through vulnerability, as well as use their voices to challenge each other to be more understanding, accepting, and tolerant of each other and bring value to their community.

Living African Anyoh Fombad

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 48 Ratings

Living African is a podcast that sparks hard conversations that challenge questionable cultural and societal norms, which threaten the wellbeing of the African community. The host, Anyoh Fombad, features various African guests who share their stories from heart-wrenching to exciting experiences growing up in Africa and the diaspora. By normalizing these open discussions, Anyoh hopes to encourage Africans to show their strength through vulnerability, as well as use their voices to challenge each other to be more understanding, accepting, and tolerant of each other and bring value to their community.

    014: A Different Perspective of Healing from Fibroids - With Mane Ndoping

    014: A Different Perspective of Healing from Fibroids - With Mane Ndoping

    The topic of fibroids is one thing that we will never stop talking about to raise awareness about the disease in our community. As time goes by, I have gotten to know more women who have struggled with fibroids and I have come to the realization that it is far more common than being spoken about. 
    Data from Michigan Medicine shows that “Nearly a quarter of Black women between 18 and 30 have fibroids compared to about 6% of white women, according to some national estimates. By age 35, that number increases to 60%. Black women are also two to three times more likely to have recurring fibroids or suffer from complications.”
    There is definitely a dire need for more education and discussion on this topic to help raise awareness and sensitize our community. So, today, our guest will give us a different perspective on her personal experience with fibroids. Be inspired!
     
    Meet Our Guest :
    Our guest for Episode 14 aka “A Different Perspective of Healing from Fibroids” is Mane Ndoping. Mane was Born and raised in Cameroon and came to the US when she was 18. Studied psychology in undergrad 2012. Obtained MSc in Occupational Therapy 2015. She is a health and wellness enthusiast focusing on mental wellness and functional nutrition.
    She started a journey of self-healing in 2009, which has morphed through the years leading to the birth of NannezFruitDlight in 2019; a venture that she's passionate about through which she shares her personal journey of healing as well as information for other health challenges from other health and wellness professionals.

    Contact Our Guest:
    Email: mnaboutme@gmail.com Instagram: NannezFruitDlight and or Mz_Nanne  
    Things You Will Learn in This Episode: 
    [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction
    Introducing our guest - Mane Ndoping [03:00 – 30:00] Mane’s Entrepreneurship Journey 
    Getting to know Mane Ndoping Coming to America Health complications after diagnosis Continious check ups & diagnosis [30:00 – 1:00:00] Further Diagnosis & Treatment
    Change of diets  Healing from Fibroids Recommendations on how to heal from Fibroids Words of encouragement to the African community How to get in touch with Mane [1:00:00 – 1:13:55] Final Words
    Mane's final words Anyoh’s final words
    Tweetable Quotes:
    “Some foods that we eat overwork the liver and make it hard for it to eliminate toxins, so it just stays in the body. One thing I learned about fibroids is that people who have fibroids, in most cases, have high estrogen. And the liver helps to excrete the excess. But then if we feed our liver with less optimal food, it's not able to excrete it so it stays in the body, and then it causes [complications].” - Mane Ndoping 
     
    LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue putting out the best content just for you!
     
    Connect with Living African Podcast: You can connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, or send us an email at hello@livingafricanpodcast.com.
     
    Check out our website www.livingafricanpodcast.com for more resources and to learn more. Connect with host, Anyoh: You can connect with Anyoh on Facebook (@anyohf), Instagram (@anyohfombad), and Twitter (@anyohfombad).

    • 1 hr 4 min
    013: An African Immigrant's Journey to Innovation - With Leslie Asanga

    013: An African Immigrant's Journey to Innovation - With Leslie Asanga

    African immigrants have contributed significantly to the growth and diversity of the overall Black population in the United States. As an immigrant, I know how hard it is for someone to come to the United States with nothing but a dream and work hard to see their dreams come to pass.
    That's the story of Leslie Asanga who is an entrepreneur creating solutions to some of the enormous problems we faced back home in Africa, Cameroon specifically.
    Join us now as we deep dive into his journey as an immigrant and entrepreneur
    Meet Our Guest :
    Dr. Asanga is a pharmacist and an entrepreneur with 10+ years of healthcare and entrepreneurship experience. He is the founder and CEO of Pills2Me - an on-demand prescription delivery service - which was launched at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. He is also the co-founder and CEO of UrPharm (an easy way to search, find, and pay for medications in sub-Saharan Africa). He holds a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree and an MBA from Roseman University of Health Sciences, Nevada, and a Master of Public Health degree from Yale University. He was the winner of the Thorne Prize at startup Yale - Yale University's annual entrepreneurship award for healthcare innovation. He is an innovator and very passionate about using technology to solve healthcare problems, especially in vulnerable communities.
    Contact Our Guest:
    Email: Leslie@pills2me.com
    LinkedIn: Leslie Asanga
     


    Things You Will Learn in This Episode: 
    [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction
    Introducing our guest - Leslie Asanga [03:00 – 30:00] Leslie’s Entrepreneurship Journey 
    Getting to know Leslie The founding of his two companies How his humble beginnings inspired his entrepreneurship journey The services offered by the companies Leslie founded Where to find Leslie businesses in Africa & America [30:00 – 1:00:00] Further Diagnosis & Treatment
    Life growing up in Cameroon The difficulties he had to deal with growing up His education and business ventures back in Cameroon The impact family had on him  Coming to America for studies Finding problems to solve Words of encouragement to the African community How to get in touch with Leslie [1:00:00 – 1:13:55] Final Words
    Leslie's final words Anyoh’s final words  
    Tweetable Quotes
    “Our people have a lot of potentials but just don't explore them. People just boxed themselves into tiny boxes. They say - I'm doing this, I'm staying on this track, but I think there's a whole lot more that we can do if we just decide to explore, and not be afraid to fail.” - Leslie Asanga

    “Focus on the positive side of things, but believe that the negative side can happen so have a contingency plan, knowing that, this can happen, but I know the probability of that worst-case scenario happening is low and I know what do in case the worst-case scenario happens. So be positive all the time even when you have a negative fact.” - Leslie Asanga

    “What I will say to anyone is that chase your dreams! Right? I know, it's been said 1000 times before but you know, you don't let your guard down. Forget about the failure, forget about everything else and go chase your dreams!” - Leslie Asanga

     
    LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue putting out the best content just for you!
    Connect with Living African Podcast: You can connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, or send us an email at hello@livingafricanpodcast.com.
    Check out our website www.livingafricanpodcast.com for more resources and to learn more. Connect with host, Anyoh: You can connect with Anyoh on Facebook (@anyohf), Instagram (@anyohfombad), and Twitter (@anyohfombad).

    • 1 hr 13 min
    012: My Last Pulpit - LGBTQ+ Activism — with Mr. John Adewoye

    012: My Last Pulpit - LGBTQ+ Activism — with Mr. John Adewoye

    As mentioned in episode eight, last year - we got mixed feedback about the series of episodes we did with members of the LGBTQIA+ community to honor Pride Month. But in alignment with the goal of this podcast, not everyone will like every topic we talk about, especially topics that make people uncomfortable.

    You see, growing up, most of our parents never educated us on sex, relationships, and marriage because they believed that talking about it meant that they were encouraging us to do it. The truth is that as adults, many of us wish we had this education when we were younger. Also, whether they spoke to us about it or not, that didn’t mean sex and/or relationships weren’t still happening behind their backs.

    Using the same logic as the sex/relationship talk, whether we agree (or not) to educate ourselves about the lgbtqia+ community, or think that acknowledging them means encouraging their “practices” (as some people call it) in our African community, one FACT still remains: the lgbtqia+ community exists in the African community whether we agree or not. They are actually close family and friends and you may not even know it. You don’t have to agree with them or their values, but you should respect them for who they are and how they choose to live their life, just like you will expect to be respected. We can always agree to disagree in love and respect! I learnt a lot from this episode and hope you do too.
    Meet Our Guest:
    Mr. John Adewoye was born in Kwara State Nigeria and was the last child of the 4 surviving children of his parents. 
    “Surviving” characterized his life story from his teenage years till he was 40 years old because of my sexual orientation. The struggle was really intense for him throughout his elementary school years where he was nicknamed "obinrin" meaning a girl because of his effeminate behavior. The teenage years were particularly traumatic for him because neither he nor those who bullied me had a name for what set him apart from other boys. No one addressed this issue with him as would have been today; not even his parents. 
    At age 40, he came to the US in pursuit of conversion therapy, where he came to the realization that he needed no cure but self-acceptance. 
    As a then-priest, he also got to be aware of the fact that he need to leave the Priesthood to keep his self-acceptance, grow in it and share it. He decided to come out and stay as a visible example for those who may need his evidence in their personal struggles as homosexuals. 
    Mr. Adewoye has been happily married to his partner Adebayo John Omoworare since 2016. He is happy with his life and desires the same for everyone.
     
    Things You Will Learn in This Episode: 
    [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction
    Introducing our guest - Mr. John Adewoye [03:00 – 30:00] Mr. John Adewoye Shares His Journey 
    Life growing up in Nigeria Going to seminary school His work as a priest in Nigeria Coming to America His work in the LGBTQ+ Community Awards & Recognitions [30:00 – 50:00] Life In America & Activism
    Finding his purpose in America Activism and advocacy for African LGBTQ+ people Advising the African community How to get in touch with Mr. John Adewoye [50:00 – 57:34] Final Words
    Mr. John Adewoye final words Anyoh’s final words  
    Tweetable Quotes
    “When we try to conform to the pressure of the society, it lead to  some women to marry the man they weren't really attracted to. It has led some men to marry women who they aren't attracted and that has led to raise suffering of the people we should love.” - Mr. John Adewoye
     
    “So it is our duty, though we may not accept or support - it's our duty to educate ourselves so that we can respect them, because regardless of our beliefs, we must respect them first and foremost, as humans, we must respect one another.” - Anyoh Fombad
     
    “So either gay or straight - the most important thing for me, is whatever I can do for humanity. And that is what I se

    • 57 min
    011: Living With Hashimoto's Thyroiditis - With Anna Arrey

    011: Living With Hashimoto's Thyroiditis - With Anna Arrey

    Dear listeners, this week - we will be talking about “Living with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis”. We will be having Anna Arrey on this episode(11) to discuss her journey with this disease, raise awareness, and share the lessons learned through battling this disease with you. So firstly, what is Hashimoto's Thyroiditis?
     
    Hashimoto's disease is an autoimmune disorder affecting the thyroid gland. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck just below the Adam's apple. The thyroid produces hormones that help regulate many functions in the body. An autoimmune disorder is an illness caused by the immune system attacking healthy tissues. In Hashimoto's disease, immune-system cells lead to the death of the thyroid's hormone-producing cells. The disease usually results in a decline in hormone production (hypothyroidism).
     
    It is our hope that by the end of this conversation – you learn something new, become more aware of this disease through Anna's experience, and equip yourself with knowledge you or a loved one may need.
    Things You Will Learn in This Episode: 
    [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction
    Introducing our guest - Anna Arrey [03:00 – 40:00] Anna Shares Her Journey 
    Life growing up in Cameroon Getting diagnosed with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis  The impact of the diagnosis on her life Getting a wrong diagnosis in Cameroon Traveling to India for treatment Spending three months in India [40:00 – 1:10:24] Further Diagnosis & Treatment
    Finding alternative medicine The impact support groups had on her Linking up with foreign doctors Dealing with insensitive words from the community  The importance of having a support system We must show more empathy and less judgment How to get in touch with Anna [1:10:00 – 1:09:00] Final Words
    Anna's final words Anyoh’s final words  
    Tweetable Quotes
    “I've learned that if you put God at the center of your life, he's going to be there for you. I am a testimony of God's grace.” - Anna Arrey
     
    “I'm going to use the opportunity to give a huge shout-out to those Uncles and Aunties and family members that step up for the other family members and take the role of a parent to other family members who are definitely not their children – directly or biologically. So, I just want to give a shout-out to your [Anna's] uncle and auntie and tell them that, we really appreciate them here at Living African Podcast for everything that they have done for you.” - Anyoh Fombad
     
    “I don't let anybody stress me. I walk away from s****y people – negative and toxic people. If I find out you are a toxic person, trust me. I won’t even say good morning.” - Anna Arrey
     
    LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue putting out the best content just for you!
    Connect with Living African Podcast: You can connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, or send us an email at hello@livingafricanpodcast.com.
    Check out our website www.livingafricanpodcast.com for more resources and to learn more. Connect with host, Anyoh: You can connect with Anyoh on Facebook (@anyohf), Instagram (@anyohfombad), and Twitter (@anyohfombad).

    • 1 hr 15 min
    010: Battling Infertility - With Kiali Garrett

    010: Battling Infertility - With Kiali Garrett

    In episode 9, Kiali shared her “baby loss” story with us and now she is back to share that of “battling infertility” after losing her baby and trying to conceive again. Infertility is often a silent struggle and women who are struggling to conceive report feelings of depression, anxiety, isolation, and loss of control.
     
    Despite the prevalence of infertility, the majority of infertile women do not share their stories with family or friends, thus increasing their psychological vulnerability. The inability to reproduce naturally can cause feelings of shame, guilt, and low self-esteem. These negative feelings may lead to varying degrees of depression, anxiety, distress, and a poor quality of life.
     
    Therefore, it is our hope that Kiali’s story will encourage other women and empower our community to keep encouraging such conversations.
     
    Meet Our Guest:
     
    Kiali J. Garrett is an MBA with a Finance & Accounting background, and she manages large-scale projects for a living. Best known for her positivity, and managerial and leadership skills, she has worked across a broad range of industries including Banking, Hospitality, Automobile and Telecommunications, and Healthcare IT. She is an entrepreneur and founder of PeaceSteps, an organization for a cause that seeks to promote global peace. Kia also runs a style blog (www.classandasmile.com), a platform on which she expresses herself and a plinth she uses to influence, inspire, and empower women across the globe. She is a people person with a positive mindset, and she enjoys discovering new places, immersing herself in different cultures, and engrossing in adrenaline-rush adventures.
    Contact Kiali: 
    Instagram: @classandasmile
    Facebook: Kia Kia
    E-mail: classandasmile@gmail.com
    Get Kiali’s book on amazon, better world books, and thriftbooks.
    Website: www.classandasmile.com
     
    Things You Will Learn in This Episode: 
    [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction
    Introducing our guest - Kiali Garrett [03:00 – 40:00] Kiali Shares Her Journey 
    Trying to have another baby two years after loss Getting diagnosed with idiopathic infertility The impact of the diagnosis on her life Going through the IVF procedure two times Having miscarriages  Getting pregnant unaware Safely carrying to term and delivery  [40:00 – 1:10:24] Lessons & Words of Encouragement
    The power in vulnerability Why we need to share our experiences Dealing with insensitive words from the community  The importance of having a support system We must show more empathy and less judgment How to purchase Kiali’s book How to get in touch with Kiali  [1:10:00 – 1:15:00] Final Words
    Kiali's final words Anyoh’s final words  
    Tweetable Quotes
    “Be compassionate. You never know what people are going through. Just don't assume that because people got married in December so by September, they should be having a baby. And then after that, you start asking them – Oh, where's the baby? When are you guys gonna have kids? Don't do that because you have no idea what this couple is going through.” - Kiali Garrett
     
    “Be there for your spouse and support your spouse. Try to recognize that he's on the journey with you and that he's trying to have a baby as well – most importantly, with you. So you need to try to be considerate, if you need to run errands for him, go out and do it. Just don't sit there and throw everything at him.” -  Kiali Garrett


    “When I got pregnant I was told by doctors and friends that sometimes when you're so stressed, your body is not a  friendly environment so it expels and can’t harbor a pregnancy. But I think being calm, and being less stressed, and trying not to stress yourself will help you a lot.” - Kiali Garrett
     
    LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue putting out the best content just for you!
    Connect with Living African Podcast: You can connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, o

    • 1 hr 10 min
    09: Surviving Baby Loss - With Kiali Garrett

    09: Surviving Baby Loss - With Kiali Garrett

    There is no greater worry for a parent than losing a baby. A baby's death is particularly distressing since it is frequently unexpected and goes against the natural order of life, in which the baby is expected to precede their parents. The emotional trauma of losing a baby can result in a variety of psychological and physiological issues, including sadness, anxiety, stress-related cognitive and physical symptoms, marital issues, an increased risk of suicide, pain, and guilt.
     
    All of these concerns can last a long time after a baby dies, and they can lead to a documented psychiatric condition like complicated grief disorder, which has many symptoms that are comparable to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
     
    Today, we will be having Kia Tumban on #Episode9 to discuss how she has and is “Surviving Baby Loss”. The goal of having this conversation is to share some key points with any dealing with a loss and how we as a community can be of help to each other during those times. Hope this episode positively impacts you as I did to us during the recording.
     
    Meet Our Guest:
     
    Kiali J. Garrett is an MBA with a Finance & Accounting background, and she manages large-scale projects for a living. Best known for her positivity, and managerial and leadership skills, she has worked across a broad range of industries including Banking, Hospitality, Automobile and Telecommunications, and Healthcare IT. She is an entrepreneur and founder of PeaceSteps, an organization for a cause that seeks to promote global peace. Kia also runs a style blog (www.classandasmile.com), a platform on which she expresses herself and a plinth she uses to influence, inspire, and empower women across the globe. She is a people person with a positive mindset, and she enjoys discovering new places, immersing herself in different cultures, and engrossing in adrenaline-rush adventures.
    Contact Kiali: 
    Website: www.classandasmile.com
     
    Things You Will Learn in This Episode: 
    [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction
    Introducing our guest - Kiali Garrett [03:00 – 40:00] Kiali's Pregnancy & Diagnosis With Placenta Abruption
    She had a risk-free pregnancy Getting diagnosed  What is placenta abruption? Going to Surgery & Delivery Losing a baby & the aftermath  [40:00 – 1:09:13] 
    The healing process Dealing with insensitive words from the community  Sharing the lessons learned Kiali's book on "Baby Loss" How to get in touch with Kiali  [1:10:00 – 1:15:00] Final Words
    Kiali's final words Anyoh’s final words  
    Tweetable Quotes
    “I choose to focus on the good and not the bad because I realized that where my focus goes, energy flows! So I decided to focus on some of the things that I have that maybe other people don't necessarily have, feeling gratitude.” - Kiali Garrett
     
    “I learned that the fathers of these babies, they're hurt too. Regardless of whether they carry the pregnancy or not, regardless of whether they went through a C-section or not, they’re hurt! We need to be there for them as our spouses or partners, brothers or sisters, we need to be there for them. You need to check on them. Don't only send flowers to your sister, send flowers to your brother-in-law as well.” -  Kiali Garrett



    “I feel like as a community, we should also tend to attend to the men because the men as well are going through a lot. Whether the baby is here or not, the men also feel that impact because they're also the closest wants to you, and it's also their child, it's a man's child as well so we shouldn't neglect their mental health.” - Anyoh Fombad



    “I remember when I was going through my journey, I was listening to a lot of people with a positive mindset and it helped me get out of those dark days that I was in to find some light. So I encourage you to share this knowledge with everyone around you so you can help them in one way or the other.” - Kiali Garrett
     
    LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the epis

    • 1 hr 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

Tancho Zinky ,

Excellent!!!!!

This podcast is very educative . The host is doing such a great job. These are definitely topics we need to discuss as Africans

EthelAks ,

Educative, insightful and interesting

Very powerful and educative conversations.. I’ve learned so much from this platform and I’m always looking forward to the next episodes. Every week I’m constantly reminded via different conversation topics that we need to do better. Thank you Anyoh for this amazing platform.

Ryanjon ,

Amazing

Great to hear. Amazing stories and live experiences. 👍