247 episodes

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affair‪s‬ Rick Harp

    • News Commentary
    • 5.0 • 90 Ratings

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

    High Hopes for Haaland

    High Hopes for Haaland

    This week, high hopes for Deb Haaland—the congresswoman from New Mexico and citizen of the Laguna Pueblo who could make history as the first Indigenous person to ever serve as Secretary of the Interior for the United States. First things first, though: she still needs to be confirmed by the U-S Senate. Although committee hearings have wrapped up, a vote has yet to be held.
    But amidst all the excitement over her potential appointment, some have struck a more cautious tone about what it may—or may not—make possible. That includes Nick Martin, a staff writer at The New Republic and author of the recent piece, “Deb Haaland’s Ascent and the Complicated Legacy of Native Representation.”
    In this episode, Martin joins host/producer Rick Harp and roundtable regular Candis Callison to discuss why he thinks even “[some]one as capable as Haaland [confronts] an unfortunate truth… [that] whenever Native people have occupied positions of great power within [the] colonial machine [they’ve either left] embittered or transition[ed] themselves into an active participant in the grand American tradition of treaty-breaking and excuse-making.”
    // CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Creating Culpability for Colonial Cosplay (Pt. 2)

    Creating Culpability for Colonial Cosplay (Pt. 2)

    Punishment for Pretendians: the back half of our extended look at colonial cosplay. And if part one was all about the problem, this part’s all about solutions. Just what is to be done about all these faux First Nations actors, authors and academics? What mechanisms might we use, and by whose authority? Does it make sense to target all the players, or would it be better to re-write the rules of the game?

    Back with host/producer Rick Harp to assess what's been put forth as ways to sift through the grift are Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC, and Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta as well as Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment.
    // CREDITS: This episode edited by Stephanie Wood. Music includes: “Summer Tour Bird Windows” by Strategy (CC BY 3.0); 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Contemplating the Consequences of Colonial Cosplay

    Contemplating the Consequences of Colonial Cosplay

    With issues of identity reaching a fever pitch of late, we thought we’d take its temperature. From Michelle Latimer’s contested claims to Indigeneity, to an ever-growing, quasi-underground list of Alleged Pretendians, not to mention a Twitter tempest over light-skin privilege, we’ll break down what’s at play, what’s at stake and—in part two—what might be ways out of this messy business.

    Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, as well as Candis Callison, Associate Professor in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies and the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC.
    // CREDITS: This episode edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 41 min
    Why medically-assisted dying is very much an Indigenous issue

    Why medically-assisted dying is very much an Indigenous issue

    Medically-assisted death. It’s a controversial subject to say the least, precisely why any effort to legislate it has proven just as contentious. So it is in Canada, where laws have been challenged and critiqued, both in and out of court, as either too broad, too narrow or even both, depending on who’s doing the talking—and whom they’re talking about. And with the federal government poised to re-codify medical assistance in dying (MAID), there are those concerned the law’s expansion of access to it will do more harm than good, and that the gap between intent and outcome will see those already put at risk placed into even greater peril. One such critic is Andray Domise (aka Q), who in a recent Globe and Mail editorial argued that proposed changes to the law risk the reinscription of the Canadian colonial logic of eugenics. And Q is our special guest this episode, joining host/producer Rick Harp and roundtable regular Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.
    // CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Canada's effective monopoly on First Nations citizenship

    Canada's effective monopoly on First Nations citizenship

    A new brief from the Yellowhead Institute has shone a light on yet another Canadian government attack on the spirit if not the letter of a human rights order demanding equity for First Nations kids. Issued by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, the order supports the right of First Nations children to access the same essential public services as any other kid in Canada, free of delays due to disputes over who should pay for it. It's known as Jordan's Principle, named for the late Jordan River Anderson, whose all-too-short 5 years of life was marred by such jurisdictional disputes.
    Although everyone says they agree with the principle, their actions tell a different story, a new chapter of which is well documented in the recent Yellowhead brief, "Happy New Year To Everyone But Non-Status Kids: Jordan’s Principle & Canada’s Persistent Discrimination." In this episode, we sit down with Yellowhead Associate Fellow Damien Lee to learn more about what's driving federal moves to restrict the principle to Status Indian kids only—in other words, to only those kids Canada deems 'legitimately' Indian, regardless of who First Nations themselves claim as citizens.
    // CREDITS: This episode was edited by Stephanie Wood. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 40 min
    Should the next Governor-General be First Nations?

    Should the next Governor-General be First Nations?

    Repping the Queen. With Canada’s last Governor-General stepping down due to scandal, there are those who say her replacement ought to be a First Nations person. And while the idea seems innocuous on its face—what with the bulk of their day-to-day duties confined to ribbon-cutting and rubber-stamping—there is one potential complication: the fact the role literally represents a foreign monarch whose assertion of dominion over Indigenous territories is still kind of controversial.

    Joining host/producer Rick Harp are roundtable regulars Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.
    // CREDITS: Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
90 Ratings

90 Ratings

MaxMWolfe ,

Prolific Show!

I love this podcast and all the topics and guests. Kim Tallbear has become one of my most favorite thinkers and scholars ever. Thank you for having her on so much! As a white settler, this show is helping me learn so many crucially important things that I never got taught in school.

Vallaerius ,

Informative, provoking, and entertaining coverage on indigenous issues and news

This podcast is one of my favorites, enough so that I’ve been come a monthly funded of the podcast.

I’ve found such value in the perspectives Rick and his many amazing guests. For someone who is trying to learn more about indigenous issues in our communities I’m glad that MI serves as one of my primarily crash courses into important topics and helps guide my thinking on what to learn about.

eternal_pessimist ,

Great News Source

Thoughtful, poignant and honest discussion.

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