290 episodes

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs Rick Harp

    • News
    • 4.9 • 115 Ratings

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

    Did media really just victim-blame a gunned-down Métis hunter?

    Did media really just victim-blame a gunned-down Métis hunter?

    This week, it's another 'MINI' INDIGENA, where we pack in sizzling-hot takes on a flurry of items via social audio. Joining host/producer Rick Harp on Friday, May 20 via the Callin app were MI regulars Ken Williams (assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama) and Trina Roache (Rogers Chair in Journalism at the University of King’s College) as they discussed:
    • Might more and more settlers in Australia be finally taking climate change a tad more seriously now that it's made some of their homes effectively uninsurable?
    • Did mainstream media really just victim-blame a gunned-down Métis hunter?
    • How a Reuters / Globe and Mail article ("Indigenous Canadians [sic] make a painful plea on eve of British royal visit") triggered many of Trina's pet peeves about reportage on Indigenous peoples;
    • monthly Patreon podcast supporter Courtney asks: "Should local First Nations hold approval/veto power over urban planning and land use decisions on their traditional territories?"
    >> CREDITS: 'Blueprint' by Jahzzar (CC BY-SA 4.0); ‘In Shadows’ by William Ross Chernoff's Nomads (CC-BY); ‘Feeling Like A Delicate Cookie’ by Captive Portal (CC BY-SA 4.0)

    • 29 min
    The Colonial Complications of Indigenous Reproductive Choice

    The Colonial Complications of Indigenous Reproductive Choice

    For our eighth 'MINI' INDIGENA of the season, MI regular Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) and special guest January Rogers (Mohawk/Tuscarora poet, author, and media producer from Six Nations of the Grand River) join host/producer Rick Harp via the Callin app to discuss:
    i) Jacqueline Keeler’s recent piece, “Striking Down Roe v. Wade Leaves Native Women and Girls Even More Vulnerable”;
    ii) why the time may be right for a Mister Indian World competition;
    iii) how the pro sports team that brought us the ‘Tomahawk Chop’ took it upon themselves to add their voice to National Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Awareness Day;
    iv) intersections between forced sterilization and criminalizing abortion
    >> CREDITS: 'Microship' by CavalloPazzo (CC BY-SA 4.0)

    • 31 min
    Looking HBC’s ill-gotten gift horse in the mouth

    Looking HBC’s ill-gotten gift horse in the mouth

    Gift or grift? When it comes to the spoils of colonialism, perhaps none have been more spoiled than the Hudson’s Bay Company. A 17th century creature of empire which drove a global fur trade, HBC would go on to make itself synonymous with Canada, blanketed in the country’s foundational myths. Along the way, exploiting and extracting all it could from Indigenous lands, waters and peoples. These days, such nationalist nostalgia has taken a bit of a hit, it seems; so too, The Bay’s days of department store dominance. Which may help explain the company’s recent embrace of a novel way to launder its reputation: by handing over one of its most iconic buildings to a First Nations organization. But can this present make up for its past? Will this ultimate fixer-upper help renovate the Relationship—or just expose the gargantuan cracks in its foundations?
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp to construct an answer to these questions and more are roundtable regular Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, along with special guest Adele Perry, Distinguished Professor of History and the Director of the Centre for Human Rights Research at the University of Manitoba.
    // CREDITS: Our opening/closing theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    How Canada sprinkles 'Reconciliation' on First Nations then tells them it's raining (ep 287)

    How Canada sprinkles 'Reconciliation' on First Nations then tells them it's raining (ep 287)

    Another week, another 'MINI' INDIGENA (our seventh of the season), where host/producer Rick Harp is joined by yet another pairing of APTN National News alumni, Trina Roache (Rogers Chair in Journalism, University of King’s College) and special guest Tim Fontaine (Editor-in-Grand-Chief of Walking Eagle News) as they all discuss:

    i) how a brutal editorial cartoon out of Simcoe County, Ontario about the Pope’s so-called 'apology' regarding residential schools has itself prompted not one but two apologies

    ii) whether anyone's got a decent working definition of decolonization

    iii) whether 'Reconciliation' is on the brink, if not outright over the edge, of becoming little more than a catch-phrase for Canadians

    iv) the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe's use of ancient DNA to try and support its claim for federal recognition by the U.S. government
    // CREDITS: 'Make Love' and 'Everything You Ever Dreamed' by Holizna; 'Clouds' by Lucien Kemper x Fachhochschule Dortmund

    • 28 min
    Is it time to toss 'Indigenous' categories for mainstream arts awards? (ep 286)

    Is it time to toss 'Indigenous' categories for mainstream arts awards? (ep 286)

    For our sixth-ever 'MINI' INDIGENA, host/producer Rick Harp is joined by roundtable regulars—and fellow APTN National News alumni—Ken Williams (assistant professor, University of Alberta’s department of drama) and Trina Roache (Rogers Chair in Journalism, University of King’s College) to discuss:
    i) how some in Maine fear tribes potentially regaining some measure of sovereignty means they'll ‘flex their muscle’ on environmental, fish and wildlife, and economic development;
    ii) whether the recent haul of hardware by Indigenous creatives at the Canadian Screen Awards means we can now get rid of special ‘Indigenous’ categories;
    iii) how rampant and illegal poaching threatens wild white sage in California;
    iv) whether those who toppled the controversial ‘Gassy Jack’ statue in downtown Vancouver were out of line for not first checking with regional Indigenous people
    >> CREDITS: 'Blueprint' by Jahzzar (CC BY-SA 4.0); ‘In Shadows’ by William Ross Chernoff's Nomads (CC-BY); ‘Feeling Like A Delicate Cookie’ by Captive Portal (CC BY-SA 4.0)

    • 30 min
    Getting Real With Artificial Intelligence

    Getting Real With Artificial Intelligence

    Hardly a day goes by it seems without news of some ‘revolutionary’ A.I.-driven tool ushering in a brave new world. Less said is who’ll be left out or left behind. Which is why, when it comes to Indigenous content, some fear much of artificial intelligence remains superficial ignorance. But can ‘The Cloud’ incorporate culture? Can we Indigenize as we digitize? And can the digital be made relational?
    Joining host/producer Rick Harp to tangle with these tricky, trippy questions and more are Kim TallBear, professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Trina Roache, Rogers Chair in Journalism at the University of King’s College.
    // CREDITS: Our opening/closing theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

    • 1 hr 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
115 Ratings

115 Ratings

riribex ,

CLB 💛

Loved the two-part with Chief Lady Bird! I appreciate her & am so glad to now know of such great hosts! The insights were so deep & funny, too.

Srevis ,

Everyone Needs to hear this show!

Indigenous voices are critical to our political and social issues! I love this podcast. It is so informative and current. Thank you so much.

MaxMWolfe ,

Prolific Show!

I love this podcast and all the topics and guests. Kim Tallbear has become one of my most favorite thinkers and scholars ever. Thank you for having her on so much! As a white settler, this show is helping me learn so many crucially important things that I never got taught in school.

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