35 episodes

You can’t love something unless you look at it entirely; you can’t heal what you don’t reveal—telling the Haitian 🇭🇹 story, one episode at a time. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/negmawonpodcast/support

Nèg Mawon Podcast Patrick Jean-Baptiste

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

You can’t love something unless you look at it entirely; you can’t heal what you don’t reveal—telling the Haitian 🇭🇹 story, one episode at a time. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/negmawonpodcast/support

    [Scholar Series #21a] After the Dance, the Drums Are Heavy. Carnival, Politics, and Musical Engagement in Haiti. A Conversation w/ Dr. Rebecca Dirksen

    [Scholar Series #21a] After the Dance, the Drums Are Heavy. Carnival, Politics, and Musical Engagement in Haiti. A Conversation w/ Dr. Rebecca Dirksen

    *Manoumba Records label granted permission to include excerpt of "Dèpi tanbou frape" track by Boulo Valcourt

    I love foundational work like this! A richly ethnographic and compelling read, After the Dance, the Drums Are Heavy is a study of carnival, politics, and the musical engagement of ordinary citizens and celebrity musicians in contemporary Haiti. The book explores how the self-declared president of konpa Sweet Micky (Michel Martelly) rose to the nation's highest office while methodically crafting a political product inherently entangled with his musical product. 

    It offers a deep historical perspective on the characteristics of carnivalesque verbal play and the performative skillset of the artist (Sweet Micky) who dominated carnival for more than decade-including vulgarities and polemics. Yet there has been profound resistance to this brand of politics led by many other high-profile artists, including Matyas and Jòj, Brothers Posse, Boukman Eksperyans, and RAM. 

    These groups have each released popular carnival songs that have contributed to the public's discussions on what civic participation and citizenship in Haiti can and should be. Drawing on more than a decade and a half of ethnographic research, Rebecca Dirksen presents an in-depth consideration of politically and socially engaged music and what these expressions mean for the Haitian population in the face of challenging political and economic circumstances. 

    After the Dance, the Drums Are Heavy centers the voices of Haitian musicians and regular citizens by extensively sharing interviews and detailed analyses of musical performance in the context of contemporary events well beyond the musical realm.


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    • 49 min
    [Scholar Series #20b] Urban Dwellings, Haitian Citizenships: Housing, Memory, and Daily Life in Haiti. A Conversation w/ Dr. Vincent Joos

    [Scholar Series #20b] Urban Dwellings, Haitian Citizenships: Housing, Memory, and Daily Life in Haiti. A Conversation w/ Dr. Vincent Joos

    In this second episode of the series (2/2), Dr. Vincent Joos explores the failed international reconstruction of Port-au-Prince after the devastating 2010 earthquake. He describes the failures of international aid in Haiti while ihe analyzes examples of Haitian-based reconstruction and economic practices.

    By interrogating the relationship between indigenous uses of the cityscape and the urbanization of the countryside within a framework that centers on the violence of urban planning, Dr. Joos shows that the forms of economic development promoted by international agencies institutionalize impermanence and instability.

    Conversely, he shows how everyday Haitians use and transform the city to create spaces of belonging and forms of citizenship anchored in a long history of resistance to extractive economies. Taking our listeners into the remnants of failed industrial projects in Haitian provinces and into the streets, rubble, and homes of Port-au-Prince, Dr. Joos reflects on the possibilities and meanings of dwelling in post-disaster urban landscapes.


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    • 47 min
    [Scholar Series #20a] Urban Dwellings, Haitian Citizenships: Housing, Memory, and Daily Life in Haiti. A Conversation w/ Dr. Vincent Joos

    [Scholar Series #20a] Urban Dwellings, Haitian Citizenships: Housing, Memory, and Daily Life in Haiti. A Conversation w/ Dr. Vincent Joos

    In this series of episodes (2), Dr. Vincent Joos explores the failed international reconstruction of Port-au-Prince after the devastating 2010 earthquake. He describes the failures of international aid in Haiti while he analyzes examples of Haitian-based reconstruction and economic practices. 

    By interrogating the relationship between indigenous uses of the cityscape and the urbanization of the countryside within a framework that centers on the violence of urban planning, Dr. Joos shows that the forms of economic development promoted by international agencies institutionalize impermanence and instability. 

    Conversely, he shows how everyday Haitians use and transform the city to create spaces of belonging and forms of citizenship anchored in a long history of resistance to extractive economies. Taking our listeners into the remnants of failed industrial projects in Haitian provinces and into the streets, rubble, and homes of Port-au-Prince, Dr. Joos reflects on the possibilities and meanings of dwelling in post-disaster urban landscapes.


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    • 59 min
    [Scholar Series #19b] Island Futures: Caribbean Survival in the Anthropocene. A Conversation with Mimi Sheller

    [Scholar Series #19b] Island Futures: Caribbean Survival in the Anthropocene. A Conversation with Mimi Sheller

    In Island Futures Mimi Sheller delves into the ecological crises and reconstruction challenges affecting the entire Caribbean region during a time of climate catastrophe. Drawing on fieldwork on postearthquake reconstruction in Haiti, flooding on the Haitian-Dominican border, and recent hurricanes, Sheller shows how ecological vulnerability and the quest for a "just recovery" in the Caribbean emerge from specific transnational political, economic, and cultural dynamics. Because foreigners are largely ignorant of Haiti's political, cultural, and economic contexts, especially the historical role of the United States, their efforts to help often exacerbate inequities. Caribbean survival under ever-worsening environmental and political conditions, Sheller contends, demands radical alternatives to the pervasive neocolonialism, racial capitalism, and US military domination that have perpetuated what she calls the "coloniality of climate." Sheller insists that alternative projects for Haitian reconstruction, social justice, and climate resilience—and the sustainability of the entire region—must be grounded in radical Caribbean intellectual traditions that call for deeper transformations of transnational economies, ecologies, and human relations writ large.


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    • 44 min
    [Scholar Series #19a] Island Futures: Caribbean Survival in the Anthropocene. A Conversation with Mimi Sheller

    [Scholar Series #19a] Island Futures: Caribbean Survival in the Anthropocene. A Conversation with Mimi Sheller

    In Island Futures Mimi Sheller delves into the ecological crises and reconstruction challenges affecting the entire Caribbean region during a time of climate catastrophe. Drawing on fieldwork on postearthquake reconstruction in Haiti, flooding on the Haitian-Dominican border, and recent hurricanes, Sheller shows how ecological vulnerability and the quest for a "just recovery" in the Caribbean emerge from specific transnational political, economic, and cultural dynamics. Because foreigners are largely ignorant of Haiti's political, cultural, and economic contexts, especially the historical role of the United States, their efforts to help often exacerbate inequities. Caribbean survival under ever-worsening environmental and political conditions, Sheller contends, demands radical alternatives to the pervasive neocolonialism, racial capitalism, and US military domination that have perpetuated what she calls the "coloniality of climate." Sheller insists that alternative projects for Haitian reconstruction, social justice, and climate resilience—and the sustainability of the entire region—must be grounded in radical Caribbean intellectual traditions that call for deeper transformations of transnational economies, ecologies, and human relations writ large.


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    • 36 min
    [Scholar Series #17] The Prophet & Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, The International Community, & Haiti. A Conversation with Dr. Alex Dupuy

    [Scholar Series #17] The Prophet & Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, The International Community, & Haiti. A Conversation with Dr. Alex Dupuy

    This compelling book and author offer a comprehensive analysis of the struggle for democracy in Haiti, set in the context of the tumultuous rise and fall of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Swept to power in 1991 as the champion of Haiti's impoverished majority and their demand for a more just, equal, and participatory democratic society, the charismatic priest-turned-president was overthrown by the military just seven months into his first term. 

    Popular resistance to the junta compelled the United States to lead a multinational force to restore Aristide to power in 1994 to serve out the remainder of his presidency until 1996. When he was re-elected for a second and final term in 2000, Aristide had undergone a dramatic transformation. Expelled from the priesthood and no longer preaching liberation theology, his real objective was to consolidate his and his Lavalas party's power and preserve the predatory state structures he had vowed to dismantle just a decade earlier. To maintain power, Aristide relied on armed gangs, the police, and authoritarian practices. That strategy failed and his foreign-backed foes overthrew and exiled him once again in 2004. 

    This time, however, the population did not rally in his defense. Written by one of the world's leading scholars of Haiti, The Prophet and Power explores the crisis of democratization in a poor, underdeveloped, peripheral society with a long history of dictatorial rule by a tiny ruling class opposed to changing the status quo and dependent on international economic and political support. Situating the country in its global context, Alex Dupuy considers the structures and relations of power between Haiti and the core capitalist countries and the forces struggling for and against social change.


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    • 36 min

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