236 episodes

Podcast host and author David Andrew Wiebe is known for his calm and level-headed delivery of instructional podcast content for independent musicians and music business owners. After a six-month hiatus from his previous show, DAWCast: Music Entrepreneurship, and some thoughtful deliberation, he rebranded and relaunched. The New Music Industry Podcast isn’t just a simple and easily understood show name – it is also the title of his latest highly-praised book – The New Music Industry: Adapting, Growing, and Thriving in The Information Age – featuring personal development and business advice and a comprehensive view of modern marketing strategies – social media, blogging, podcasting, video, live performance, radio, and more. Listeners can expect to hear interviews with a wide range of people – not just musicians, experts and industry people, but also marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners that can bring a much-needed valuable perspective to the discussion. Wiebe has already had the likes of Bob Baker, James Moore, Ross Barber, Helen Austin, Eddie Meehan, Christopher Sutton, DeCarlos Garrison, Ian Temple, Melina Krumova, James Schramko, Brian Poillucci, Andrew Galucki, Deborah Fairchild, Jason Davis, Sean Murphy, Kevin Breuner, Jules Schroeder, Dobbs Franks, Johnny Vieira, Vik Rajan, Richard "Younglord" Frierson, Monica Strut, Brent Vaartstra, Matt Starr and many others.

The New Music Industry Podcast | MusicEntrepreneurHQ.com | with David Andrew Wiebe David Andrew Wiebe

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    • 4.8 • 5 Ratings

Podcast host and author David Andrew Wiebe is known for his calm and level-headed delivery of instructional podcast content for independent musicians and music business owners. After a six-month hiatus from his previous show, DAWCast: Music Entrepreneurship, and some thoughtful deliberation, he rebranded and relaunched. The New Music Industry Podcast isn’t just a simple and easily understood show name – it is also the title of his latest highly-praised book – The New Music Industry: Adapting, Growing, and Thriving in The Information Age – featuring personal development and business advice and a comprehensive view of modern marketing strategies – social media, blogging, podcasting, video, live performance, radio, and more. Listeners can expect to hear interviews with a wide range of people – not just musicians, experts and industry people, but also marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners that can bring a much-needed valuable perspective to the discussion. Wiebe has already had the likes of Bob Baker, James Moore, Ross Barber, Helen Austin, Eddie Meehan, Christopher Sutton, DeCarlos Garrison, Ian Temple, Melina Krumova, James Schramko, Brian Poillucci, Andrew Galucki, Deborah Fairchild, Jason Davis, Sean Murphy, Kevin Breuner, Jules Schroeder, Dobbs Franks, Johnny Vieira, Vik Rajan, Richard "Younglord" Frierson, Monica Strut, Brent Vaartstra, Matt Starr and many others.

    235 – How to Find Your Path to Digital Marketing Success as an Independent Artist

    235 – How to Find Your Path to Digital Marketing Success as an Independent Artist

    How have things changed for musicians in the last 12 months? How can musicians utilize social media and digital marketing powerfully to create success in today’s world climate?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    In this episode:



    * 00:32 – Gaki Music podcast interview

    * 01:41 – Digital marketing and social media overview

    * 08:51 – Forming your marketing strategy

    * 11:38 – What’s the one thing musicians should be focused on in digital marketing?

    * 17:17 – Diversifying your product range

    * 24:23 – How to overcome physical or mental obstacles

    * 32:30 – Musicians are innovators

    * 35:33 – What is the key to digital marketing and social media success?

    * 39:04 – The New Music Industry book



    Get The New Music Industry book

    David here.

    In today’s episode, you’re going to be hearing an interview I did with Wolf at Gaki Music, which is at gakimusic.com.

    We had a great conversation about social media, digital marketing, and how independent musicians can create results with their marketing efforts, even in the midst of lockdowns.

    Let’s get into it.

    Wolf shares about social media and digital marketing

    Wolf shares about how it has become even more essential for artists to embrace social media and digital marketing during lockdowns, even if they have an adverse reaction to social media or self-promotion.

    Wolf asks about how things have changed in the last 12 months and what the impact has been.

    David shares broadly about digital marketing and social media

    First, David explains the importance of knowing who your audience is. He shares how you can identify both the demographic and psychographic data concerning your audience.

    David says it isn’t necessarily for musicians to play in dive bars for 10 years to build their audience from scratch anymore, as their audience has already been built. Musicians can act as the CEO of their own music business and find ways to collaborate and partner with others who have access to their audiences they’re trying to appeal to.

    All you need to know is who you’re trying to appeal to, and you can begin communicating with that audience in different online pockets (like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) today.

    Second, David explains the basics of octopus marketing, why it’s important, and how it works. It’s all well and good to create relationships and a following on social media, but if you have nowhere to send your fans to (i.e., a web property you own), you’re almost certainly leaving money on the table.

    Your website should be the central space where fans can access everything you’ve ever worked on – demos, bonus tracks, your back catalog, anything your fans might be interested in.

    Use your website to collect email addresses and sell to your fans. Don’t be shy or tentative about your selling! That can create unnecessary awkwardness.

    If possible, musicians should not measure their audiences wallets by their own and be proactive in creating offers ranging from 99 cents to $9,999 (entry-level, mid-tier, high ticket, etc.).

    Third, musicians must craft their brand. Not just their visual brand (colors, logos, costumes, etc.) but also their internal brand – their purpose, the impact, the difference they want to make in the world.

    One’s branding and audience should be in alignment for them to work optimally.

    Musicians should also be clear on their brand positioning – what makes them different or unique, what makes them stand out in the world. They should use this brand positioning in all their marketing materials so art they can create an instant connections with their fans.

    • 40 min
    234 – The Renegade Musician eBook Review

    234 – The Renegade Musician eBook Review

    234 – The Renegade Musician eBook Review

    Why was The Renegade Musician eBook written? Why was it a crucial addition to our product portfolio at Music Entrepreneur HQ? Why did I write it, and who is it for?

    All this and more in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:28 – Behind the scenes of The Renegade Musician

    * 01:15 – Why did David write The Renegade Musician?

    * 03:11 – Who is The Renegade Musician for?

    * 04:48 – Stepping Out of the Shadow of the Old Music Career Model?

    * 06:03 – Pick up your copy of The Renegade Musician bundle



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    It’s time to go behind the scenes of The Renegade Musician eBook and digital magazine bundle. This bundle officially became available on April 1, 2021 and not as an April Fool’s joke. It’s interesting because I have a bit of a history with April 1 releases. My second book, The Essential Guide to Music Entrepreneurship also came out on April 1 in 2018. That also wasn’t an April Fool’s joke, even though it would be exactly like me to play a bit of a trick on you.

    In previous episodes, I’ve already read the introduction and offered an overview of what you can expect to learn in each chapter. So, in this episode I’ll give you a bit of an insider’s perspective on the new bundle, why I wrote the new eBook, who it’s for, what it means to step out of the shadow of the old music career model and so on.

    Why I Wrote The Renegade Musician eBook

    At the end of February, I created The Renegade Musician digital magazine. I gave away a few copies, and some people enjoyed it.

    I thought about making The Renegade Musician digital magazine a series. And that would mean putting together new installments of it regularly. Maybe not once every moth, but at least once per quarter.

    Though the digital magazine did okay, it wasn’t a runaway success, so I didn’t necessarily think it would be the best use of my time to create future issue.

    I was planning to archive the March issue on April 1 anyway, so that could have been the end of it.

    But then I realized something. If I deleted the offer, all the links I’d built up to it would become broken links. And then I’d have to fix those. That would be a significant time loss, and not a task I’m likely to prioritize, despite it being kind of pain.

    That’s when it occurred to me that I could replace the digital magazine with an eBook. And of course, the idea to bundle the two was soon to follow.

    I ended up writing, editing, and formatting the new eBook, at over 8,000 words in just four days. Certainly, I was under a bit of a time crunch by the time I had realized I was going to action this plan, but to my surprise, an important message poured out of me as I was writing. A message of artist empowerment.

    I didn’t write this eBook to add another product to my portfolio. Music Entrepreneur HQ and Content Marketing Musician are already home to multiple eBooks, books, courses, and coaching programs. I wrote it because I was compelled to write it.

    In the past, I’ve written logic-minded how-to guides like The Music Entrepreneur Code. And I’m proud of that work. But this was something different.

    It shares some similarities with The Essential Guide to Music Entrepreneurship, in that it revolves around mindset. But I’ve evolved quite a bit as a writer, thinker, and coach since then. So, from the opening paragraph, you will find that this book is a no holds barred, no B.S. harsh truth book that shamelessly calls you out and point to you as the solution to all your problems.

    • 7 min
    233 – The Renegade Musician eBook Overview

    233 – The Renegade Musician eBook Overview

    What can you expect to find inside The Renegade Musician? How can it help you on your music career journey?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:26 – The Renegade Musician, a “harsh truth” eBook

    * 01:02 – Chapter 1: Music business

    * 01:19 – Chapter 2: Personal development

    * 01:42 – Chapter 3: Profit leverage

    * 01:59 – Chapter 4: Reinvesting

    * 02:20 – Chapter 5: Opportunity

    * 02:40 – Chapter 6: Prioritization

    * 03:02 – Chapter 7: Home base

    * 03:27 – Chapter 8: Paying the price

    * 03:55 – Chapter 9: Leadership

    * 04:14 – Chapter 10: Intuition

    * 04:32 – Chapter 11: Question everything

    * 04:54 – Chapter 12: Commitment

    * 05:17 – Chapter 13: Networking

    * 05:41 – Chapter 14: Planning

    * 06:02 – Conclusion

    * 06:31 – The Renegade Musician bundle



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David here.

    Today I wanted to talk about my new eBook, The Renegade Musician: Stepping Out of the Shadow of the Old Music Career Model.

    In a previous episode, I read the first two chapters of the book to give you a better idea of what’s on the inside.

    In this episode, I’ll go through each remaining chapter and give you a brief overview of what’s inside the eBook, which you should pick up right away. I’ll share the links at the end of this episode.

    This is a “harsh reality” kind of eBook. In this episode, I’ve softened the blow a little bit, but fair warning – you can expect these points to be harder hitting when you get to reading it.

    Chapter 1: Music Business

    The music business is 50% music and 50% business. The smartest musicians know this, so in addition to their creativity, they prioritize outreach, networking, marketing, and other high-level tasks that can bring the next breakthrough in their careers.

    Chapter 2: Personal Development

    Smart musicians understand the value of personal development and actively engage in reading, listening to podcasts, watching videos, signing up for seminars, going to conferences and events, seeking out mentorship, and more.

    Even if it’s just to keep up with best practices in communication, email marketing, or release strategy, you will never find them resting on their laurels.

    Chapter 3: Profit Leverage

    Smart musicians are always looking for ways of turning their income into more income. They don’t blow their cash on alcohol and afterparties. They consider carefully how their financial resources can be leveraged, be it advertising, PR, saving up for their next release, or otherwise.

    Chapter 4: Reinvesting

    Smart musicians reinvest into their career. Their money goes towards better stage costumes, banners, lights, gear, websites or sales funnels, photos, branding, copy, and more.

    If you’re the type to spend everything you’ve earned at a gig, there’s much you can learn from those who actively and aggressively reinvest in their careers.

    Chapter 5: Opportunity

    Most musicians tend to compete for the same festival and opening slots, as well as bar gigs and other opportunities. A smart musician might throw their hat in the ring, but they also create their own opportunities. They are always looking for opportunities to add value to people and places where their music fits in.

    Chapter 6: Prioritization

    A smart musician prioritizes what they work on day to day. They might spend some time on social media, but not before working on their website. They might work on their website, but not before sending an email to their list. And so on.

    • 7 min
    232 – The Renegade Musician eBook Preview

    232 – The Renegade Musician eBook Preview

    How do you access empowerment as an artist? How do you create and claim the opportunity that’s already yours?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:25 – The Renegade Musician bundle

    * 01:24 – The starving artist stereotype

    * 02:41 – The value of creativity

    * 03:24 – So why do artists starve?

    * 04:55 – What is a Renegade Musician?

    * 06:49 – The Renegade Musician is a concept

    * 07:59 – The Renegade Musician is a philosophy

    * 09:49 – The Renegade Musician is an ideal

    * 11:53 – The Renegade Musician is a movement

    * 12:17 – Claiming your copy of The Renegade Musician



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    So, I’ve been sharing a little bit about The Renegade Musician digital magazine as of late.

    The product was good, but the concept was especially memorable. Which is why I developed it into a full eBook.

    And now I’ve bundled up the digital magazine and new eBook. You can purchase the bundle for $30 at Gum.co/RenegadeMusician as well as MusicEntrepreneurHQ.com/renegade.

    It doesn’t matter much to me which link you purchase through. The Gumroad version mainly caters to my Twitter audience, but if you purchase through the Music Entrepreneur HQ link, you’ll be able to set up your account with Content Marketing Musician, where my top-tier courses and products live.

    I’ll be sharing more about the eBook in future episodes, but in this episode, I wanted to read the first two chapters for you. So, let’s get into it.

    Introduction

    Are you tired of the same old, same old?

    The starving artist stereotype has been perpetuated through the ages, and we even have tortured genius archetypes like Vincent van Gogh to point to whenever it’s convenient. People wrongfully assume he lived out a tragic, penniless life when in fact he was just an eccentric recluse who liked to paint.

    But it gives your parents and teachers more reason to say, “Becoming an artist is impractical. If a genius like van Gogh couldn’t do it, what chance do you have? Go to school, get good grades, and find a good job. That’s your path to security.”

    To be fair, if your parents or teachers are still saying that, they’re probably gen X or older. Millennials were born into a much different world, and intuitively, they have always known the flaws with the traditional model. They have always sought to do things their own way. Play by their own rules. Seek fulfillment outside the accepted norms.

    It’s plain to see where the old model has led. We see it in the eyes of those whose DNA we share. And we don’t necessarily like what we see.

    It’s all well and good to do things your own way, play by your own rules, and seek fulfillment on your own terms. But to do it right, requires a radical shift in perspective and approach.

    And it begins with thinking differently about creativity and music in general.

    The value of creativity is beyond any thoughts we entertain or conceive of in our daily lives.

    Creativity is crucial to a child’s development. It teaches them valuable problem-solving skills, and it can even aid in the development of social skills.

    Creativity is highly valued in the workplace. Business without creativity isn’t just boring. It has a way of being needlessly rigid and dogmatic. Self-important even. Business without creativity is stale and unappealing.

    Most importantly, creativity is divine. That may seem a bold statement, but if we were to entertain the notion that God himself created the world we occupy, then to create is a godly act.

    So, why do artists starve? Who’s responsible?

    • 13 min
    231 – How to Get Millions of Streams on Spotify – with Isabella Bedoya of Fame Hackers

    231 – How to Get Millions of Streams on Spotify – with Isabella Bedoya of Fame Hackers

    Would you like to get your music streamed millions of times on Spotify? What if there was a proven step-by-step process you could follow to achieve that goal?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:25 – Owner of Fame Hackers Isabella Bedoya

    * 01:34 – Approach to digital marketing and e-commerce

    * 03:06 – Why Spotify?

    * 04:50 – The importance of being fan-centric

    * 08:16 – How do we go about finding our ideal fans?

    * 11:30 – Why is it so important that artists optimize their brand to attract their ideal listeners?

    * 13:50 – Getting the right kind of PR and playlisting

    * 18:16 – Is maximizing your revenue as simple as growing your fan base?

    * 20:35 – Sales funnels for musicians

    * 22:09 – Who not how

    * 24:02 – Can artists get millions of streams?

    * 26:32 – What’s the last YouTube video Isabella watched?

    * 27:02 – What’s Isabella’s daily routine like?

    * 28:47 – What is the greatest challenge Isabella has overcome?

    * 30:12 – What is the greatest victory Isabella has experienced?

    * 31:00 – Are there any books that helped Isabella on her journey?

    * 32:29 – The Renegade Musician



    Transcription:

    David Andrew Wiebe: Today I’m chatting with the founder of Fame Hackers, Isabella Bedoya. How are you today, Isabella?

    Isabella Bedoya: Hey, David. Thanks for having me here today.

    David: Yeah, thanks so much for joining me. So today, you run Fame Hackers but when you used to work as an A&R for a label under Sony Music, what led to you doing what you do today and what has your trajectory been like?

    Isabella: Such a great question. Back in the day when I used to be an A&R, I quickly realized that the very first thing that people are like, or like at least labels are looking for are artists that have a social media following that’s real, high quality, authentic, essentially demonstrate that they have a fan base, and that they also can monetize that. Right? So basically, I understood that as long as you have digital marketing and ecommerce principles as part of your music career, then you can make it successfully as an independent artist. So yeah, once I figured that out, then I was like, “Okay, cool. So, if you can just teach an artist how to do this, there wouldn’t be so many starving artists in coats, right?” That’s how I got to where I am today, just that desire to help.

    David: That’s awesome. And yeah, you’re totally spot on. It is so challenging, I think, to convince musicians that they have to learn digital marketing or eCommerce principles. So, I know you have your own approach to that. What is your answer to that?

    Isabella: I mean, honestly, it is one of the most challenging things to teach artists and musicians because also… And I don’t think it’s their fault exactly but I also think it’s because of the way that society thinks that independent artists are like starving artists and it’s a hobby, and it’s a pipe dream, you’re never going to make it. So immediately, you have these very talented, gifted individuals that are not able to actually live up to their full potential just from the way that they were raised. And it’s not even on the parents. It’s just society in general. That’s how the majority treats musicians. So, when you first get them to actually step out of that and actually realize that they’re super valuable, and worthy, and talented, and then you just teach them how to market themselves in a way where you’re not also being kind of like slimy and icky because I know that’s something that comes up a lot where people don&#...

    • 33 min
    230 – Getting Back to the Basics

    230 – Getting Back to the Basics

    In uncertain times, it’s easy to get caught up in doing a lot of fancy, new things that might not yield results. But sometimes, the best thing you can do is get back to the basics.

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:31 – Creativity is all about the process

    * 00:55 – Year one mindset

    * 01:20 – Are you doing what you know you need to do?

    * 02:05 – Are you still committed to learning?

    * 03:10 – Do you have the right pieces in place?

    * 04:22 – Are you making checklists and procedure documents?

    * 05:30 – Are you taking care of yourself?

    * 06:32 – Episode summary

    * 06:56 – First-time coaching special



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    We need to be able to find joy in the process.

    Creativity is all about the process, and if we end up focusing on the results, we can rob ourselves from the joys of creating. Your creativity has a way of becoming a means to an end if all you care about are the results.

    Which is why I thought I would talk about getting back to the basics. I have found incredible value in adopting a year one mindset. And what that means is letting go of whatever has or hasn’t happened in the past. It means getting excited about the process again.

    So, here are some questions you can ask yourself to see whether you’re engaging in and focusing on the right things as you look to create and share your music in 2021.

    Are You Doing What You Know You Need to do?

    This might seem like an odd question, but it’s essential.

    If you know you’ve got a performance coming up, be it a live stream or otherwise, are you spending time preparing for that performance?

    Are you building out your website?

    Are you engaging your social media following?

    Are you sending out weekly email newsletters?

    This is all quite basic, and nowhere near as sexy as Clubhouse or Instagram. But doing what you know you need to do has a way of producing the results. Whereas experimenting with the latest social media platform can wait.

    Consider sitting with this question for a while. You will begin to see things you could be dedicating some time and effort to.

    Are You Still Committed to Learning?

    Are there gaps in your knowledge? Things you know you should learn, but have neglected? Things you keep avoiding?

    I’ve been watching my business coach’s old training videos, and I’ve come to see just how adept he is at things I have considered boring – things like keyword and competitive research, conversion tracking links, identifying business opportunities, profit and loss statements, and more.

    Now, as a musician you might not be actively thinking about those things. You might be trying to learn the Lydian mode, or trying to coordinate outfits with your band, or figuring out how to film your own music videos.

    The point is that we all have gaps in knowledge and oversights. There are things we avoid, things we don’t like, things we’re not good at.

    If these areas don’t have a direct impact on our careers, then we don’t necessarily need to put all our time into developing strengths in them.

    But if they are holding back our careers, we should be willing to revisit them. Because our next breakthrough might come from augmenting our weaknesses.

    Do You Have the Right Pieces in Place?

    You may have heard me talk about James Schramko’s Own The Racecourse methodology before. It’s a system for creating your own platform and growing it through the publishing of content.



    Well, for a long time, I’ve been doing a lot of the work myself, either because I was afraid to hire, or I just didn’t have enough revenue to be able to bring someone on the team.

    But I recently brought on a podcast editor, and this has shaved several hours of my week I can reallocate to other work o...

    • 8 min

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The music industry has changed dramatically and this podcast will help you evolve with the times so that you can pursue your dream of being a musician!

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