335 episodes

We are living through a paradigm shift from trickle-down neoliberalism to middle-out economics — a new understanding of who gets what and why. Join zillionaire class-traitor Nick Hanauer and some of the world’s leading economic and political thinkers as they explore the latest thinking on how the economy actually works.

Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer Civic Ventures

    • Government
    • 4.7 • 1.4K Ratings

We are living through a paradigm shift from trickle-down neoliberalism to middle-out economics — a new understanding of who gets what and why. Join zillionaire class-traitor Nick Hanauer and some of the world’s leading economic and political thinkers as they explore the latest thinking on how the economy actually works.

    Democracy in Default (with Brian Judge)

    Democracy in Default (with Brian Judge)

    This week, Nick and Goldy are joined by political scientist Brian Judge, author of "Democracy in Default: Finance and the Rise of Neoliberalism in America." They delve into the historical roots of our current democratic crisis, exploring the role of liberalism in depoliticizing distributive conflicts and paving the way for the rise of neoliberalism. Judge sheds light on the impact of neoliberal ideologies on American policymaking and how liberalism's attempts to manage distributive conflict through the market have shaped our economic and political landscape—which gave leaders the opportunity to use the economic slowdown of the 1970s to install neoliberal policies that enriched the wealthy few for decades. 

    Brian Judge is an author and policy fellow at the Center for Human-Compatible Artificial Intelligence and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy at the University of California, Berkeley. He is recognized for his recently published book, "Democracy in Default: Finance and the Rise of Neoliberalism in America," which delves into the intricate relationship between finance and politics in shaping the neoliberal economic landscape in the United States

    Twitter: @realbrianjudge

    Further reading: 

    Democracy in Default: Finance and the Rise of Neoliberalism in America

    Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com
    Twitter: @PitchforkEcon
    Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics
    Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer

    • 37 min
    The FTC's Renewed Fight Against Corporate Power (with Elizabeth Wilkins)

    The FTC's Renewed Fight Against Corporate Power (with Elizabeth Wilkins)

    After decades of slow and cautious movement, the Federal Trade Commission has suddenly kicked into overdrive. You’ve likely seen headlines about the FTC challenging corporate mergers and monopolies, loosening Big Tech’s chokehold on our digital lives, and fighting power imbalances that favor big corporations over American consumers. Elizabeth Wilkins, former Chief of Staff and Director of the Office of Policy and Planning at the FTC, joins Nick and Goldy to give a status update on the FTC's renewed focus on competition and broader antitrust enforcement, and to explain how the historical evolution of the agency has led to a lack of regulation and oversight in maintaining fair competition and consumer protection. 

    Elizabeth Wilkins is an expert in consumer protection and competition policy and a newly minted Senior Fellow at the American Economic Liberties Project. Previously, she was the Chief of Staff to the Chair and Director of the Office of Policy and Planning at the Federal Trade Commission. Before joining the FTC, Wilkins served as Senior Advisor to White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain. 

    Twitter: @ewwilkins

    Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com
    Twitter: @PitchforkEcon
    Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics
    Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer

    • 40 min
    Ours Was the Shining Future (with David Leonhardt)

    Ours Was the Shining Future (with David Leonhardt)

    This week, Nick and Goldy are joined by Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist David Leonhardt to discuss his latest book, Ours Was the Shining Future: The Story of the American Dream. They discuss the relationship between academic economics and the forces that sought to dismantle the mid-century consensus that promoted shared economic growth in the post-World War II era. Leonhardt shares anecdotes from his extensive research, highlighting what lessons from the past could guide us toward a more equitable future.

    David Leonhardt is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and columnist for The New York Times, where he writes its flagship newsletter, “The Morning.” He has also been the newspaper’s Washington bureau chief, an op-ed columnist, a staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, and the founding editor of “The Upshot.”

    Twitter: @DLeonhardt

    Further reading: 
    Ours Was the Shining Future: The Story of the American Dream
    New York Times: Why Are Republican Presidents So Bad for the Economy?
    The Great Exception: The New Deal and the Limits of American Politics

    Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com
    Twitter: @PitchforkEcon
    Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics
    Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer

    • 40 min
    What Does Obama’s Chief Economist Think About Bidenomics? (with Jason Furman)

    What Does Obama’s Chief Economist Think About Bidenomics? (with Jason Furman)

    This week, Nick and Goldy have a wide-ranging conversation with Jason Furman, who served as Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama. Furman brings a wealth of experience to the discussion, which covers America’s post-pandemic recovery, the global inflation crisis, and reviving industrial policy. He also provides insight into the overall impact of President Biden's policies on the broader economic landscape. 

    Jason Furman is a prominent economist who served as the Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama from 2013 to 2017. He is currently a Professor of the Practice of Economic Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and a Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Furman is known for his expertise in economic policy, particularly in the areas of tax policy, healthcare, and labor markets.

    Twitter: @jasonfurman

    Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com
    Twitter: @PitchforkEcon
    Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics
    Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer

    • 48 min
    Unpacking America’s Housing Affordability Crisis (with Whitney Airgood-Obrycki)

    Unpacking America’s Housing Affordability Crisis (with Whitney Airgood-Obrycki)

    This week, Nick and Goldy are joined by Whitney Airgood-Obrycki from the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University to discuss the urgent issue of housing affordability in the United States. Despite its status as the wealthiest country in the world, America is grappling with a housing crisis, marked by record-high levels of homelessness and a growing number of individuals spending between 30% to 50% or more of their income on rent. Together, they unpack the housing affordability crisis, discuss how it contributes to the perception of a struggling economy, and explore the innovative solutions local governments are proposing to address it.

    Whitney Airgood-Obrycki is a Senior Research Associate at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. She conducts research on affordable rental housing for low-income households and served as the project manager and lead author of their recent report on America’s Rental Housing. Dr. Airgood-Obrycki's latest research includes affordable housing policy, housing affordability measures, rental housing markets, and suburban neighborhood change.

    Twitter: @airbrycki, @Harvard_JCHS

    America’s Rental Housing 2024 
    Montgomery County has found a way to reinvigorate public housing in America
    What if public housing were for everyone?

    Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com
    Twitter: @PitchforkEcon
    Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics
    Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer

    • 37 min
    Junking Junk Fees (with Rohit Chopra)

    Junking Junk Fees (with Rohit Chopra)

    This week, Nick and Goldy sit down with Rohit Chopra, the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, to explore the agency's efforts to lower financial costs for working Americans. From cracking down on credit card late fees to tackling medical debt on credit reports and regulating bank overdraft charges, Director Chopra sheds light on the CFPB's various initiatives to promote transparency and competition in financial products and services. Chopra argues that by advocating for consumer rights and protections, the CFPB is shaping a more equitable economic landscape for all Americans.

    UPDATE: This episode was recorded before yesterday’s breaking news that a Texas judge issued a last-minute order temporarily blocking the CFPB’s plan to cap credit card late fees. Find more information about the injunction, and the Chamber of Commerce’s case against the cap, here: https://www.cnn.com/2024/05/11/business/credit-card-late-fees-regulation-cfpb/index.html

    Rohit Chopra is the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a federal agency dedicated to protecting consumers in the financial marketplace. Prior to leading the CFPB, he served as a Commissioner at the Federal Trade Commission, where he focused on promoting fair competition and protecting consumers from deceptive practices.

    Twitter: @chopracfpb, @CFPB

    Further reading: 
    www.consumerfinance.gov 
    Submit a complaint about a financial product or service
    CFPB Bans Excessive Credit Card Late Fees, Lowers Typical Fee from $32 to $8

    Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com
    Twitter: @PitchforkEcon
    Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics
    Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1.4K Ratings

1.4K Ratings

Kenosha, Wisconsin ,

End stage capitalism

Like to hear about recent thoughts, views, criticisms about “ end stage capitalism “.

punishedkojimbo ,

Became a mouthpiece for Bidenomics

Sad to see what I thought was a good channel of analysis and pushback from the lens of capitalism skepticism’s to a full mouthpiece to moronic concepts like “yeah we can fix capitalism” and “surely bidenomics are great”

Good riddance

rosesandhello ,

I appreciate the positive, realistic policy ideas

It’s rare in current media to find commentary around capitalism that is focused on making capitalism work well. There is plenty out there opposing it completely, or praising it completely, or pretending that bad ideas are really great ideas that are going to work for the people they’re shilling them too. That is where Pitchfork Economics comes in with its wonky cheerleading for a vision of kinder, more effective capitalism.

I was glad to see wage theft as a recent topic but disappointed that different forms of wage theft were not explored in more detail. They spoke on a high level about classification and evading taxes but I wanted to hear much more discussion around the specific ways that corporations misclassify workers. I don’t think enough people are aware of what this looks like IRL and if they were they’d start to realize how pervasive it is. The idea of criminalizing wage theft by employers would be a game changer in terms of labor policy.

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