40 min

Nanogirl, Tory leadership, Kenya sex law, Emilie Pine Woman's Hour

We look at the prospects for the two women in the race for the Conservative Party leadership. Is there a chance the UK may see its third female Prime Minister? We hear from Rachel Sylvester, the award winning journalist who has interviewed them both and from Jessica Elgot, chief political correspondent for the Guardian about the view from the parliamentary lobby as MPs make their minds up ahead of the first ballot on Thursday.

You don’t need qualifications to teach your children about science. The science blogger Nanogirl, aka Dr Michelle Dickinson, who set up a nanomechanical testing lab in New Zealand has created a cookbook to teach children about cooking and science at the same time. Michelle talks about the significance of nanotechnology and easy ways for non-scientific parents to get their children into it.

Emilie Pine, an associate professor at University College, Dublin has written her first non-academic book, Notes to Self, a collection of essays about what it is to be a woman. She talks to Jenni about the taboo subjects she explores including infertility, miscarriage, menstruation and the effects of alcoholism in a family.

Kenya's High Court has ruled against campaigners seeking to overturn a law banning gay sex. Gay sex in Kenya is punishable by up to 14 years in prison, although it is not clear whether there have ever been any convictions. Two women talk about the impact of this ruling on them and other queer women in Kenya.

We look at the prospects for the two women in the race for the Conservative Party leadership. Is there a chance the UK may see its third female Prime Minister? We hear from Rachel Sylvester, the award winning journalist who has interviewed them both and from Jessica Elgot, chief political correspondent for the Guardian about the view from the parliamentary lobby as MPs make their minds up ahead of the first ballot on Thursday.

You don’t need qualifications to teach your children about science. The science blogger Nanogirl, aka Dr Michelle Dickinson, who set up a nanomechanical testing lab in New Zealand has created a cookbook to teach children about cooking and science at the same time. Michelle talks about the significance of nanotechnology and easy ways for non-scientific parents to get their children into it.

Emilie Pine, an associate professor at University College, Dublin has written her first non-academic book, Notes to Self, a collection of essays about what it is to be a woman. She talks to Jenni about the taboo subjects she explores including infertility, miscarriage, menstruation and the effects of alcoholism in a family.

Kenya's High Court has ruled against campaigners seeking to overturn a law banning gay sex. Gay sex in Kenya is punishable by up to 14 years in prison, although it is not clear whether there have ever been any convictions. Two women talk about the impact of this ruling on them and other queer women in Kenya.

40 min

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