193 episodes

First-person diaries, sound portraits, and hidden chapters of history from Peabody Award-winning producer Joe Richman and the Radio Diaries team. From teenagers to octogenarians, prisoners to prison guards, bra saleswomen to lighthouse keepers. The extraordinary stories of ordinary life. Radio Diaries is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Learn more at radiotopia.fm.

Radio Diaries Radiotopia

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6 • 1.1K Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

First-person diaries, sound portraits, and hidden chapters of history from Peabody Award-winning producer Joe Richman and the Radio Diaries team. From teenagers to octogenarians, prisoners to prison guards, bra saleswomen to lighthouse keepers. The extraordinary stories of ordinary life. Radio Diaries is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Learn more at radiotopia.fm.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    A Guitar, A Cello and the Day that Changed Music

    A Guitar, A Cello and the Day that Changed Music

    November 23, 1936 was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, sat before a microphone and began to play. One, Pablo Casals, was a cello prodigy who had performed for the Queen of Spain. The other, Robert Johnson, played guitar and was a regular in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. These recordings would change music history.

    This episode originally aired on NPR in 2011.

    • 17 min
    Banging on the Door: The Election of 1872

    Banging on the Door: The Election of 1872

    Voting rights was just as hot an issue in 1872 as it is today. In 1872, Susan B. Anthony and 14 other women went to cast a ballot in the election - and Anthony ended up arrested and tried. But another woman named Victoria Woodhull took things even further. That same year, she ran for president of the United States - the first woman in American history known to do so.

    • 13 min
    The Square Deal

    The Square Deal

    100 years ago, George F. Johnson ran the biggest shoe factory in the world. The Endicott-Johnson Corporation in upstate New York produced 52 million pairs of shoes a year. But Johnson wasn’t only known for his shoes. He had a unusual idea of how workers should be treated. Some people called it “Welfare Capitalism.” Johnson called it “The Square Deal.”

    • 17 min
    The Massacre at Tlatelolco

    The Massacre at Tlatelolco

    In October 1968, Mexico City was preparing to host the Olympics - the first Latin American country to do so. It was an opportunity to showcase the new, modern Mexico. However, at the same time, student protests were erupting throughout the city. On October 2, just days before the Olympics were supposed to begin, the Mexican army fired on a peaceful student protest in the Tlatelolco neighborhood. The official announcement was that four students were dead, but eyewitnesses said they saw hundred of dead bodies being trucked away - and the death toll isn’t the only thing the government covered up.

    This story originally aired on NPR in 2008.

    • 25 min
    Guest Spotlight: Ear Hustle

    Guest Spotlight: Ear Hustle

    This week we’re featuring an episode from our fellow Radiotopia show, Ear Hustle. Ear Hustle is produced inside San Quentin State Prison, in California. The show tells stories about what life is really like in prison, and after you get out.

    This episode is the first in Ear Hustle’s new season. It’s a beautiful, funny, and surprising story about the ways being incarcerated can mess with your sense of smell, and touch, and just about everything else.

    Episode artwork is by Richard Phillips, from a collaboration with the San Quentin Arts Project.

    • 32 min
    Working, Then And Now

    Working, Then And Now

    In the early 1970s, radio host and oral historian Studs Terkel went around the country, tape recorder in hand, interviewing people about their jobs. The interviews were compiled into a 1974 book called “Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do,” which became a bestseller.

    This week, we’re revisiting two of those conversations. The first is with Gary Bryner, an auto worker and union leader. The second is with Renault Robinson, a police officer. We spoke with both men four decades after their original interviews.

    These stories originally aired on NPR in 2016.

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

dateeverynight ,

Laugh, Cry, Repeat

I love Radio Diaries but one episode really struck me. I just listened to the episode from April 30, 2021 ‘25 Years of Radio Diaries’ (with Amanda from Teenage Diaries) and I just want to say: I want to be the kind of parent that Amanda’s parents are. I cried all the tears; happy, sad, relief, joy. It was a beautiful episode with two “all loving all the time”parents and their brave beautiful daughter. ❤️ Thank you Radio Diaries.

Snow Biscuit ,

Would be 5 stars if not for repeats

Many of the same episodes over and over and over. I could live with that if they warned you in the title when an episode is a rerun. (Many podcasts are HONEST and label their repeats.) They even CHANGE THE TITLE sometimes so I can’t even rely on scanning the titles of episodes I’ve already listened to in order to determine if one is a repeat!

Lee B. in PA ,

Always Interesting

I always learn something from this podcast. I especially like the way Joe Richmond gets out of the way and lets the people he’s interviewing do the talking, yet the interviews are poignant and Concise

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