189 episodes

The writers and editors of Rolling Stone take you inside the biggest stories in music. Featuring interviews with our favorite artists; what's playing in the office; expert insight on the week's biggest music news; and much more.

Rolling Stone Music Now Rolling Stone

    • Music
    • 4.1, 373 Ratings

The writers and editors of Rolling Stone take you inside the biggest stories in music. Featuring interviews with our favorite artists; what's playing in the office; expert insight on the week's biggest music news; and much more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
373 Ratings

373 Ratings

JWHrda21 ,

Enjoyable..mostly

I enjoy this podcast quite a bit. However, it does seemed rushed on occasion. The Grunge Album review episode seems like they could have discussed it longer, but chose not to for whatever reason. Also, I tend to be out of touch with many of the artist they cover, but that's a person problem. Peace

Joaquin, the Swiftie =] ,

Taylor Swift Lover

I’d never heard of this podcast before today when I saw it tweeted about and tbh I probably wouldn’t have been interested, but TAYLOR SWIFT IS LIFE! I loved listening to the break down of the tracks and your guys’ opinion on them. I think you did a wonderful job. I especially enjoyed how her older albums were mentioned and used for perspective. I could tell you guys were true fans and knowledgeable about Taylor and her catalogue. It’s always nice coming across something fresh regarding Taylor and I’ll probably look more into the podcast for content on other artists I like.

sherrypop ,

Oh! How the mighty have fallen!

Rolling Stone used to be such an important publication, documenting the important music and social climate of our times. When I put it that way, I guess I can’t fault them for the vapid music they now fawn over with all the exuberance of a virgin fan girl who has never left the confines of her bedroom. Case in point, their recent coverage of the latest Taylor Swift album. Instead of giving it a serious critical look, and lamenting the sad state of pop music today that this overproduced piece of silliness would be considered art, they kept comparing it with classic rock artists and crediting Swift with references that I’m sure she’s barely familiar with. At one point, they talked about a song called “London Boy” and attributed her talents to giving a knowing wink at Madness and Squeeze, and believed that the cliche lyrics in the song were done on purpose. Quite a stretch, when the more plausible reason is that she probably did her best, and these were the lyrics she came up with. I can’t conclude this review without mentioning that every time they do a show about stupid bubble gum pop, they parade out a colleague named Brittany something or other, who has a voice that somehow manages to have both that grating millennial rasp with a heavy dose of valley girl thrown in for good measure. Her insights don’t make listening to her any easier. Like when she described a Taylor Swift song to Weezer’s “Say it Ain’t So,” it reminded me of that one person everyone knows who pretends to have a deep knowledge of music, but really happened to hear one song while riding around with her older brother or uncle. I guess I’m in mourning for a time when popular culture had a backbone, but it is what it is, and Rolling Stone Music Now is happy to reflect that instead of exploring new and exciting music that is happening just below the glossy surface.

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