161 episodes

We tell the compelling stories behind cookbooks you won't get anywhere else. Featuring interviews with leading authors, we explore the art and craft of cookbooks, looking at both new and vintage cookbooks and the inspirations behind them … the compelling people who create them … and their impact on home cooks and the culinary world.
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Salt & Spine Brian Hogan Stewart

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.4 • 170 Ratings

We tell the compelling stories behind cookbooks you won't get anywhere else. Featuring interviews with leading authors, we explore the art and craft of cookbooks, looking at both new and vintage cookbooks and the inspirations behind them … the compelling people who create them … and their impact on home cooks and the culinary world.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


saltandspine.substack.com

    Peeps! We're talking easy, peasy, 'snackable bakes' with Jessie Sheehan

    Peeps! We're talking easy, peasy, 'snackable bakes' with Jessie Sheehan

    Hi there,

    Thrilled to share this week’s conversation with you—we’ve got Jessie Sheehan in the virtual studio! And stay tuned: we’ve got an exciting Cookbook Club announcement coming your way shortly.

    Episode 133: Jessie Sheehan

    Peeps!

    We’ve got the easy-peasy baking star Jessie Sheehan on the show this week. You may know her from her beloved previous cookbook, The Vintage Baker, or from the recipes she’s developed for numerous media outlets. Or, perhaps you too were sucked into TikTok at the start of the pandemic, where Jessie became an overnight standout for her viral, engaging videos.

    Well, we’re talking about all of it—from how she got into baking and then cookbook writing to what lessons she learned from those active days on TikTok—in today’s episode.

    Jessie’s latest cookbook, Snackable Bakes, features 100 of those “easy, peasy" recipes” for which she’s become known. Think snacking cakes, fruit crisps, cookies, and bars—all of which come together quickly and require only a few dishes and no special tools. Easy. Peasy.

    Recipe This Week:

    Paid subscribers this week will get a featured recipe for Strawberry Sheet Cake from Jessie Sheean’s Snackable Bakes:

    Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.

    We’ve got a great show for you today. Check out my conversation with Jessie and thanks for joining us to #TalkCookbooks.

    –Brian, Clea, and the Salt + Spine team

    Get full access to Salt + Spine at saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

    • 49 min
    This is Kwame Onwuachi's America (and we're just living in it)

    This is Kwame Onwuachi's America (and we're just living in it)

    Hi there,

    Apologies for the silence last week! The COVID fairy finally pulled my card, and it knocked me (and my family) down for a number of days. We’re all recovering over here, and I’m excited to share this week’s conversation with you now! I hope you’ll forgive the delay. Read on for more on my recent chat with Kwame Onwuachi—and make sure you’re subscribed to our Substack to access exclusive recipes from Kwame’s My America later this week.

    –Brian

    Episode 132: Kwame Onwuachi

    It really does feel like we’re living in Kwame Onwuachi’s America.

    Industry folks run into him around every turn—he’s fresh off the high-profile hosting gig at Monday’s James Beard Awards, for one—and his voice and influence are becoming undeniably one of the most impactful.

    After opening five restaurants before turning 30, Kwame has earned accolades from nearly every major media outlet (James Beard Foundation’s Rising Star Chef, Food & Wine Best New Chef, Esquire Chef of the Year, Forbes 30 Under 30, the “most important chef in America” by the San Francisco Chronicle, and so on).

    Now, Kwame is an executive producer for Food & Wine magazine and is responsible for convening the upcoming 2nd Annual Family Reunion, a multi-day event that celebrates racial and ethnic diversity in hospitality.

    In Kwame’s first book, 2019’s Notes From A Young Black Chef written with Joshua David Stein, he chronicles his life from growing up in New York City, with extended stints in Louisiana and Nigeria, to the path that led him to his first restaurant, the Shaw Bijou. (And that memoir is now being made into a feature film by A24!)

    He’s followed it up with a new book—this time a cookbook, titled My America: Recipes from a Young Black Chef, and also co-authored by Stein.

    Part memoir, part cookbook, My America features recipes from Kwame’s culinary journey—from Suya (Nigerian BBQ) to Egusi Stew, a Nigerian recipe he grew up eating that’s thickened with egusi (melon seed).

    Recipes This Week:

    Paid subscribers will get access to two recipes from Kwame’s My America this week: Jamaican Beef Patties and Suya (“the grandfather of American BBQ”):

    Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.

    We’ve got a great show for you today: Kwame joined us to discuss his culinary career, his books, and of course, to play our signature culinary game.

    Thanks for joining us to #TalkCookbooks!

    –Brian, Clea, and the Salt + Spine team

    Get full access to Salt + Spine at saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

    • 33 min
    Sheldon Simeon on feeding your 'ohana and the true tastes of Hawaiian cuisine

    Sheldon Simeon on feeding your 'ohana and the true tastes of Hawaiian cuisine

    Hi there —

    Happy June! This always feels like the best month to me (spoiler alert: it’s my birthday month! 🦀). It’s probably still a holdout, many many years later, of the school’s-out-and-summer-is-here bliss, but the days feel long, the dinners feel relaxed and homey, and I feel energized.

    How are you feeling this June?

    Whatever you’re feeling, we’ve got a great show for you this week:

    Episode 131: Sheldon Simeon

    This week, we’re joined by chef and author Sheldon Simeon to discuss his debut cookbook, Cook Real Hawai’i.

    Sheldon is a native of Hilo, on the Big Island, and grew up with a love for food. He learned how to cook (and how to cook for others) from his family, parlaying his interest in the craft into an impressive restaurant career.

    After graduating from the Maui Culinary Academy and an internship at World Disney World, he rose up the ranks of Hawaiian restaurants, serving as executive chef for the opening of Maui’s much anticipated Star Noodle. (He earned his first James Beard nod that year, with a 2011 Rising Star Chef of the Year nomination, and helped Star Noodle secure a Best New Restaurant nomination from the Beard Foundation.)

    The accolades kept rolling in (Food & Wine People’s Choice Best New Chef of the Pacific & Northwest, for one), and before long, “Top Chef” producers had recruited him to join the show’s 10th season in Seattle. He quickly won audience support and was one of the final three finalists. (Sheldon returned for Season 14 of the Bravo show in Charleston; he won the Fan Favorite award in both seasons.) More restaurants followed, including the beloved Tin Roof, Sheldon’s first solo restaurant which opened in Maui in 2016.

    And now, a cookbook: We're treated to Cook Real Hawai’i, Sheldon's collection of 100 recipes that he says “embody the beautiful cross-cultural exchange of islands.” From Hawaiian traditions to influences from around the globe—Asia, Portugal, the Philippines—Sheldon offers recipes for everything from wok-fried poke to crispy cauliflower katsu to chocolate birthday cake butter mochi.

    Get Cooking Today: Buy Cook Real Hawai’i from Bookshop or Omnivore Books

    Recipes This Week:

    Paid subscribers will get access to these three featured recipes from Cook Real Hawai’i this week—Chicken Hekka, Chocolate Birthday Cake Butter Mochi, and Li Hing Mui Palomas. Subscribe today so you never miss a recipe!

    Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.

    We've got a great show for you today: Sheldon joins us to talk about his career and his debut cookbook. Of course, we also put him to the test in our signature culinary game.

    Thanks for joining us to #TalkCookbooks!

    –Brian & the Salt + Spine team

    P.S. This week, I recommend reading the latest from Soleil Ho: The limits of comfort food in a time of national horror

    Get full access to Salt + Spine at saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

    • 33 min
    Fanny Singer reflects on a life defined by food in culinary memoir, Always Home

    Fanny Singer reflects on a life defined by food in culinary memoir, Always Home

    Hi there,

    Memorial Day is this weekend and if, like me, you’re just getting around to thinking about food, we can help. We dug into our Salt + Spine archives for some grill-tastic options:

    How about some Smoked Chicken or Pork T-Bones (two prime mains from pitmaster Rodney Scott)?

    Stacey Adimando’s got a side dish covered with her Blackened Summer Squash with Buttermilk Cream Sauce, Rosemary, and Chives.

    And wash it down with Grilled Margaritas from Maggie Hoffman!

    And to ring in summer, we’re offering a special Memorial Day promotion! Become a paid subscriber before the end of the month and you’ll get 20% off your first year! Remember, paid subscribers get access to our full archive of 200+ recipes from featured cookbooks, as well as other exclusive content.

    Happy grilling! And now, onto this week’s show:

    Episode 130: Fanny Singer

    We’ve got a fun episode for you today: Fanny Singer, the author of Always Home: A Daughter’s Recipes & Stories, is here to #TalkCookbooks with us.

    Fanny, of course, is the daughter of legendary restauranteur Alice Waters (who opened Berkeley’s Chez Panisse 50 years ago). Fanny is a writer, editor, art critic, and the founder of Permanent Collection, a clothing and household goods line.

    As Fanny set out to write Always Home—part memoir, part cookbook, and partially neither of those things—she began negotiating an inheritance that her mother passed down: her relationship to and appreciation for food.

    Unsurprisingly, food was a central theme in Fanny’s childhood home, though she tells us she mostly learned from her mother via “sort of a process of osmosis.” Always Home is, of course, filled with stories and memories from Fanny’s life, and it’s loaded with vivid descriptions of sensory experiences related to food: meals she’s enjoyed at home and around the world.

    She writes about her mother’s practice of burning sage or rosemary when they returned home from a trip, and how as a child she once tried fish cooked in a fig leaf—despite first being opposed to the idea—because her mother was able to describe the flavor and scent of the coconut-y leaf.

    Get Reading Today: Order via Bookshop or Omnivore Books (signed!)

    This Week’s Recipe

    Paid subscribers this week will get access to an excerpted recipe from Fanny’s Always Home for Coming Home Pasta. Subscribe today to get full access!

    Salt + Spine is a reader-supported publication. To get full access, including featured recipes, consider becoming a paid subscriber.

    We’ve got a great chat with Fanny — plus our signature culinary game and a featured recipe later this week.

    Thanks for joining us to #TalkCookbooks!

    —Brian & the Salt + Spine Team

    Get full access to Salt + Spine at saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

    • 37 min
    Traveling the world, one bite at a time, in Renee Erickson's Getaway

    Traveling the world, one bite at a time, in Renee Erickson's Getaway

    Hi there,

    Hope you are doing well — I am finally (I hope) recovering from a little non-COVID infection that took my voice fully away for a good 24 hours. Every podcast host’s nightmare! But it’s back-ish (bear with me) in time to tee up this week’s conversation, which I’m thrilled to share with all of you.

    My long-overdue conversation with chef and author Renee Erickson is hitting the podcast waves today. We recorded our chat quite some time ago and, sadly, the world got in the way and it’s been sitting in our queue.

    Episode 129: Renee Erickson

    I think you’ll love hearing from Renee about her growing up near Seattle and how she took a job at the Boat Street restaurant that parlayed itself into ownership of the whole place.

    At just 25, Renee took the helm and never looked back, growing her restaurant empire to include a good handful of establishments today. Along the way, her fame grew, and locals became enamored with her vision and values, while the culinary world flocked to the PNW to enjoy her French-inspired and Puget Sound-sourced menus.

    Renee’s first cookbook, A Boat, A Whale, and a Walrus: Menus and Stories, quickly became a classic. (I’ll admit, it’s one of the few that I rotate regularly through my in-kitchen cookbook stand.)

    And now, Renee’s second cookbook—Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You—couldn’t come at a better time. As the world keeps reopening, Getaway is Renee’s culinary guide to the places she travels to again and again, and how to eat like you’re there. From Rome to Baja California to, of course, Seattle, Renee showcases her way of travel and dining for us to emulate.

    Get Cooking Today: Order via Bookshop or Omnivore Books

    This Week’s Recipes

    Paid subscribers this week will get access to four excerpted recipes from Renee’s Getaway! Subscribe today to get full access!

    See a peek here:

    We’ve got a great chat with Renee — plus our signature culinary game and featured recipes.

    Thanks for joining us to #TalkCookbooks!

    —The Salt + Spine Team

    Get full access to Salt + Spine at saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

    • 50 min
    Chef Peter Hoffman, a decade after Savoy, still knows What's Good

    Chef Peter Hoffman, a decade after Savoy, still knows What's Good

    Hi there,

    I’m excited to share today’s episode with you: We’re joined by chef Peter Hoffman—of the legendary New York City restaurant Savoy, and then of others—to discuss his career and first book.

    Today’s Guest: Peter Hoffman

    Peter Hoffman was the chef-owner of Savoy, the farm-to-table eatery in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood he opened in 1990 and that upended ideas about fine dining at the time.

    Savoy ran for two decades before Peter shut the doors in 2011. (His other restaurants closed in subsequent years, with the final one shuttering in 2016.) During its tenure, Savoy was one of the first U.S. restaurants to champion seasonal, local cuisine; dishes typically relied heavily on and were inspired by the produce Peter would find at the Union Square Greenmarket, where he became a fixture. (A typical greeting between farmer & chef at the greenmarket: “What’s good?”)

    As a child growing up in New Jersey, Peter was introduced to an array of diverse foods. Both of his parents were home cooks—his mother more so than his father—and they inspired him to get comfortable in the kitchen. His mom taught him to read and follow recipes with the Joy of Cooking. And his housekeeper, Hortence, taught him the beauty of butter, an ingredient that gets a whole chapter in his new book. 

    Peter got his start working in kitchens at a Vermont resort after his construction job there ended. As he got more and more excited about a path in food, he trained under several renowned cooks, including Richard Olney. He traveled to Japan to learn and, one summer, even ran a small fish market. Peter says that learning from these chefs and experiences taught him the beauty of local geographies and the ingredients they provide.

    His first book, What’s Good: A Memoir in 14 Ingredients, is expressive of this type of thinking. It’s part memoir, part cookbook, and features 14 chapters each named after an ingredient that fueled the forward-thinking menus at Savoy. Filled with anecdotes and stories about running a restaurant and his slow-food philosophy, Peter says the book is not just a tribute to the many relationships he formed with farmers, cooks, and the broader community, but it is also a tribute to his journey to discover what seasonality means.

    Get Cooking: Bookshop | Omnivore Books (signed)!

    We’ve got a great episode for you today—Peter shares some stories like those that fill the pages of his book with us, stresses the importance of simplicity and sustainability, and reflects on what the past two years have meant for the restaurant industry. And, as always, we put him to the test in our signature culinary game!

    Featured Recipes This Week

    Paid subscribers get access to two featured recipes from What’s Good this week: Susan’s Peach Raspberry Pie (that’s Peter’s wife, Susan), and Peter’s Zhoug.

    Each week, paid subscribers to Salt + Spine get exclusive recipes from our featured cookbooks. To get full access (including our archive of 200+ recipes) and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber today.

    Of the zhoug, Peter writes:

    I love it with fish either accompanying a piece of grilled fish or drizzled into a fish broth brimming with spring vegetables and gently poached fish but it is great just with bread or over tomatoes. Not bad on a steak too.

    Here’s a peek at the zhoug atop a lovely piece of sea bass:

    Thanks for joining us to #TalkCookbooks,

    Brian

    Get full access to Salt + Spine at saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

    • 45 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
170 Ratings

170 Ratings

Lindsey Santee ,

This podcast brings me so much joy!

I am always so impressed by how thoughtful and well-researched the interviews are - Salt & Spine is a joy to listen to and I would love to have this podcast as a companion for years and years - please never stop!! :)

SchwiftyNos ,

"Sort of" a good podcast

If we could get Brian to stop saying "sort of" twice in every. single. sentence, this would be a great podcast.

B.Engelhart ,

Racist and sexist at times

I love salt & spine, what I do NOT love are the racist comments or sexist comments about men or causations. It’s disheartening to put snide comments about men or rude comments about causations. Even having podcasts directly about getting rid of or having less Causations on the podcast or in the cooking world. That is extremely racist and sexist! We should praise ALL walks of life, all people, all culture, men AND women, and embrace them. Not put people down. People do not choose their color, there is no place in our world for racism or sexism.

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