34 episodes

This podcast explores a question hiding in the back of our minds - what happens after we die? The near death experience is mysterious, ineffable, and life changing. By reading NDE stories, we not only can learn more about death, but also how to live.

Sam Reads Near Death Experiences Podcast Timberlion Productions

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.8, 116 Ratings

This podcast explores a question hiding in the back of our minds - what happens after we die? The near death experience is mysterious, ineffable, and life changing. By reading NDE stories, we not only can learn more about death, but also how to live.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
116 Ratings

116 Ratings

Chaplain Abby ,

Blown away

I’m stunned by the depth of the insights Sam offers into the experiences and his use anthropology, psychology, and theology in interpreting them in a broader human picture. As a seminary graduate and hospice chaplain I have a renewed sense of excitement and hope in the mystery of what is to come. I will be forever fascinated with the process of death and feel privileged to hold the hand of those taking that great journey while I ponder “what are they seeing now?” as they transition out of their body. This podcast is building on the foundation on which I approach my work, and the theory of our spiritual selves I am forming to pass on to other chaplains someday. Thank you for this gift of an impressive body of work and commitment you’ve taken time to share!

Jamie Letter ,

Enlightening but needs some work

I love the subject matter and find a lot of peace in the stories since I lost my mom 5 years ago. But... Sam needs to join Toastmasters. The utterances and fillers in his speech are just awkward and distracting.

Gemini62167 ,

Not Understanding Musical Relationship to Emotional Message?

This is in regards to the first episode, "Leila's NDE". I wish you had not commented on the aggressive rap that Leila's NDE. Music is a language of it's own and the use of music, tone, frequency, etc., has a direct relationship to state of mind. Music as a language can and does represent specific emotional messages.

As an artist and as a former bartender of 15 years in clubs, I saw directly the response to various types of music on crowds. Happy, danceable music caused a lighter mood - smiles, laughter, shots and beer for everyone! Whereas rap, heavy hip-hop, drum & bass and overly minor key'd trance dance music not only brought the mood down but resulted more often than not aggresive behavior. I've witnessed in three seperated clubs in those years that would make the choice to devote one night a week to rap/hip-hop especially and the result was always the same thing. One club wound up closing down because of an unbelieable amount of trouble and losing their regular crowd as a result. I'll never forget when someone yelled out that some guy had a gun - I was thrown over a table (yep, tiny little guy that I am). Metal detectors and wands got put in at the entrance and they had to hire more security. All that for just one devoted night a week to hip-hop and rap. The other two clubs, both had to put an end to those nights when they found that increased security was needed just to break up fights, frisking at the doors due to weapons appearing etc.. But, I don't wish to use those personal experiences as the entire reason why I think you've mistaken in judgeing Leila's experience.

Look up and read about the psychology of music and you will understand better what I say. If you have a soft spot for rap etc., than I understand your reaction to her experience. But try this, study any movie that uses the trope of dystopia as part of its story line, listen closely to the soundtrack at that moment. I can guarentee if the director is trying to convey a heavy and dark tone, they are not playing Captain and Tennile. In contempory film most often it dark, rhythmic, repetitive and loud.

I say all at the risk of being flamed or worse. But, music is the closest language we have that expresses directly through sound what emotional response it is being written and used for. Rap and hip/hop have more to do with expressing anger as a result of suffering rascism, poverty and the inner-city experience than it does the priveledged upper-crust taking a pleasant stroll along the boulevard on a warm and sweet Sunday afternoon.

Yes, there are artists out there trying to change the underlying message often heard with rap and hip-hop, but unless the tone within the music itself is lighter, it is like singing Frosty The Snowman, over the melody of the Death March. Even so, rap is still largely angry, misogynist, gangster, gang glorifying, and violence inducing. Not becauses, that was intended perhaps, but because of it's tone and it's more often than not ominous and dirgelike rhythms.

Sorry, it's just not happy music. Other than that, great podcast lol!!!

Top Podcasts In Religion & Spirituality

Listeners Also Subscribed To