296 episodes

The KUTX music team looks high and low for songs and artists that should be on your radar. It's a no-frills showcase for some of the great music that comes through the "live music capital of the world." Join us to discover new music and revisit some old favorites -- one song at a time.

Song of the Day KUT & KUTX Studios

    • Music
    • 4.1 • 82 Ratings

The KUTX music team looks high and low for songs and artists that should be on your radar. It's a no-frills showcase for some of the great music that comes through the "live music capital of the world." Join us to discover new music and revisit some old favorites -- one song at a time.

    Jill Barber: “Hell No”

    Jill Barber: “Hell No”

    When we watch characters like Marge Simpson or Mad Men‘s Betty Draper, their “homemaker” status is typically the butt of a joke. However after plenty of post-lockdown reflections, the status quo has clearly shifted back to domestic preferences. And although she’s worked damn hard for her planet-spanning, twenty-plus-year success, Canada’s Jill Barber is ready to put aside almost all of it in favor of motherhood and marriage. Almost.







    Barber boasts a discography dating back to 2002, an impressive list of international festival appearances, three JUNO nominations, countless awards, song placement in programs like Orange is the New Black, ambassadorship with Save the Children, bilingual fluency, and oh yeah, authorship of two children’s books. With a decade of marriage under her belt and a couple kids tied to her hip, this highly-decorated debonair has entered her forties with the maternal wisdom that you simply can’t rush greatness, nor should you ascribe to outdated norms.







    Sure, Jill still mixes a potpourri of infectious folk arrangements and seductive jazz vocals within perspicacious pop formulas. But she’s also eager to reclaim and re-appropriate the term “homemaker” on her eleventh full-length of the same name, out next Friday. Homemaker is a jubilant piece of musical matriarchy and cooperation, plain and simple, one that recognizes that nobody succeeds alone, that twice the work for half the pay is a raw deal. Barber’s latest cut comes straight from her creative nerve center in Vancouver, British Columbia and serves as her first as co-producer, yet another testament to the power of nurturing together.







    So if you want to stave off these statewide winter shivers, harness the warmth of emotional energy within Homemaker and say heck yeah to “Hell No”.

    • 3 min
    Sam Shaffer: “Sup?”

    Sam Shaffer: “Sup?”

    Seasons are changing and wintertime migrations are abound. But here in the Live Music Capital of the World, we’ve learned that there’s an influx of musicians from other musical metropolitans year-round. One of which, Ohio-raised multi-instrumentalist Sam Shaffer, recently hopped down here not too long ago. After a handful of albums and countless performances with Chicago psych three-piece Faintlife, Shaffer relocated to the Lone Star State in late 2021, right around the same time he recorded his solo debut EP, Quiet Delta.







    Shaffer kept the momentum from the windy city by writing and recording and first-full-length Valley of the Living Water, which swept through last September. This dozen-song collection offers some pretty honest indie-psych-folk sonics, secured by Shaffer’s velvety vocals and largely unadulterated by post-production effects. That last bit is obviously more impressive live in concert, cold weather be damned. For a Chicagoan like Shaffer, these temps won’t do much to deter him from putting on a killer show 10PM tomorrow night at Hotel Vegas, opening for Sunrosa and Guma. Take today to familiarize yourself with the Valley of the Living Water, and be sure to greet Shaffer on Tuesday evening with one of two questioning song titles off the LP, “Sup?”.

    • 3 min
    Aoife O’Donovan: “Drover”

    Aoife O’Donovan: “Drover”

    We hope you’ve been enjoying the start of our Under the Covers weekend! And since it’s so warm and snuggly under here, we certainly won’t be the ones to tear the blanket off. One of my personal favorite things to discover in hearing a new rendition of an established classic is when the “updated” version looks at the fork in the road just past a tune’s tracks and opts for the less beaten path.







    Sure you could just genre-swap the sound or gender-swap love lyrics to fit your orientation, but the covers that blow my mind the most are the ones that capture the essence of the original without sacrificing any of its integrity all the while turning it into something bigger. So with something as magnificent as Bill Callahans’ baritone-battened “Drover“, it takes a brilliantly creative mind to imagine how a masterpiece like this may sound with a more feminine, folksy inflection. A mind like Aoife O’Donovan’s.







    This Grammy-winning songwriter co-founded KUTX favorite I’m With Her and continues to front the string quintet Crooked Still. On top of that, a ton of other collaborations, plus her decade-long status as a mainstay on Prairie Home Companion, O’Donovan’s an incredibly accomplished solo artist. At the start of January, Aoife O’Donovan announced The Apathy Sessions, a deluxe edition of last year’s acclaimed Age of Apathy LP that finally hit streaming today. You’ll surely recognize Sharon Van Etten’s “I Love You But I’m Lost” among the twenty-track roster, which is phenomenal in its own right, but O’Donovan’s take on “Drover” almost redefines Callahan’s tale of bucolic solitude. O’Donovan performs every instrument (guitar, bass, keys, and of course, vocals) in this incandescent recording that unplugs the amps and plants you right on the emotionally abandoned ranch. So saddle up…just try not to tear up too.

    • 5 min
    Bennett Dampier: “I Hate You”

    Bennett Dampier: “I Hate You”

    Based on one fossil of a film franchise, we’ve pretty much come to belief that most archaeologists have some sort of a side hustle. And although they haven’t had escapades like Indy’s quite yet, today we’re digging into Austin’s Bennett Dampier. Dampier recently wrapped up his Master’s in Archaeology at Texas State, which is impressive on its own but doubly so considering he split that time writing and recording his debut album.







    Produced by David Ramirez/Big Bill drummer Jeffrey Olson and Heartless Bastards/Star Parks bassist Sam Pankey, Multiverse Tirade stacks nine tracks into a neat little package. The LP’s chock-full of Dampier’s friends for a real “who’s who” of Austin talent from projects like PR Newman, Annabelle Chairlegs, CAPYAC, Motenko, Batty, Jr., and more. Conceptually a break-up record, each arrangement, each choice of players corresponds with a specific stage of post-relationship coping, collectively into one heck of an emotional experience.







    So while we await Multiverse Tirade‘s release date, Dampier’s given us a galloping skiffle-orchestral original to tide us over ’til next week. At just over three minutes, the folksy psych harmonies and melancholy trot of “I Hate You” make it sound like an unreleased B-Side from the Get Back/Let It Be sessions, albeit defined by Dampier’s own McCartney-esque charm.

    • 3 min
    Christina Galisatus: “Candlelight”

    Christina Galisatus: “Candlelight”

    Without a cursory glance at the classical glossary, the term “chamber” might be a bit off-putting. No, it’s not music to be tortured to, nor the ambiance you’d hear in a musty dungeon. Instead, when we talk about “chamber music“, we’re really referring to palatial arrangements and efficient approaches that rely more on cooperation between players relative to their performance space, basically allowing a room’s acoustics to take on a character of its own. As a genre modifier, jazz and folk are perhaps the most analogous modern styles you could revolve into the chamber, thanks to their emphases on solo ability and roots in large hall venues. So in an era where we can digitally replicate reverb across thousands of different room designs with the click of a button, it’s heartwarming to hear artists continue to employ this centuries-old technique.







    Among those with technical respect for their sonic surroundings? Los Angeles pianist-composer Christina Galisatus. Galisatus spent her adolescence internationally touring with a symphony orchestra playing French horn, but by the time she started college, she’d fully returned to her childhood love of the ivories. Stanford degree now on the mantle, Christina Galisatus is eager to share her own variety of evocative, jazz-folk vibrations.







    This Friday Christina Galisatus gifts us her debut full-length Without Night, an amazing encapsulation of chamber-adjacent live concert magic. At sixteen tunes (a baker’s dozen of originals plus two interludes and a reprise), each harmonic reflection is a remarkable moment of nuance, only made possible through an interaction between Galisatus, her backing sextet, and their acoustic environment. Without Night also marks Galisatus’ first foray into formally writing lyrics, an experience that lends itself to the LP’s sense of rumination and resonance. But before Without Night hits wax this weekend, Christina’s lit a wick that illuminates the album’s dulcet discipline and dynamic range. The ensemble’s synchronicity both with each other and their shared space glows throughout “Candlelight”, like a torch-in-sconce that taper off the walls, floor, and ceiling into an almost amorphous luminescence.

    • 2 min
    Night Glitter: “Magic Eyes”

    Night Glitter: “Magic Eyes”

    Back in the Summer of 2018 a somewhat unexpected pairing popped up and completely blew all of us at KUTX away. I’m talking about Austin duo (and our July 2018 Artist of the Month) Night Glitter, although technically you could call them a supergroup, considering its core is composed of The Happen-Ins’ John-Michael Schoepf and longtime Thievery Corporation singer/svengali Loulou Ghelichkani. Since launching the project, they’ve learned that parenthood doesn’t necessarily preclude plugging in in the PM hours and producing under the veil of darkness.







    And these aren’t just slight hitters. No, they’re noir-y psychedelic cross-genre bangers imbued with hypnotic synth-driven dream pop and Franglais lyrics, like if Cahiers du Cinéma came up with the Blade Runner soundtrack. And lately, Night Glitter’s hinted at a new collection of tunes, due for release sometime in 2023. Once again we’re expecting them to entrance us the moment they crank those analog knobs, as experienced during their seminal studio 1A appearance.







    For those who haven’t witnessed Night Glitter live, they’ll be playing back-to-back 3Ten ACL Live performances opening for Poi Dog Pondering in late February. But for the sake of their fans’ well-being, Night Glitter also just released their first single of the year, “Magic Eyes”. From its initial crescendo all the way to its final breath, “Magic Eyes” is a gaze-inducing three-and-a-half minute piece of sonic sorcery that casts its spell with delayed-out vocals, an arpeggiated bridge, and a synesthetic sense of eye contact for your ears.

    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
82 Ratings

82 Ratings

Jpisel ,

Finally no intros

They finally got rid of the dude screaming about tacos of Texas at me every 3 minutes or less.

KUTX 98.9 ,

We heard you!

After reading the complaints about too many promos, we cut them by more than half. If you hear one at all, it’ll be at the beginning of a song only. KUTX is a public radio station so we do have to find ways to make what we do (play awesome music and support those artists) possible. Thanks for listening and supporting the Austin Music Experience. Enjoy the tunes!

PAK manza ,

Good music too much talk

The adds between all songs make it hard to listen to.

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