20 episodes

Orange Label Advertising

The 19 Retail Orange Label

    • Marketing
    • 5.0, 9 Ratings

Orange Label Advertising

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Lindon Crow – Part Two

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Lindon Crow – Part Two

    Company culture, brand story, brand experience, brand loyalty. Find out how emotional intelligence, or the ability to manage your emotions to better interact with others, is interconnected to all four and why it must be maintained over time in Part Two of The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Lindon Crow.

     

    MUSIC intro

    Recorded Intro:

    This is The 19. In 19 minutes or less, game-changing insights from Orange Label, the leading response marketing agency for established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset.

     

    Hello and welcome back to The 19: Entrepreneur Edition! I’m Rochelle Reiter, President of Orange Label. In Part Two of our interview with Productive Learning President Lindon Crow, we’re discussing the connection between emotional intelligence, company culture and brand loyalty. Let’s pick back up where we left off!

     

    HOST: Let’s talk about culture, you mentioned it a couple times, how can emotional intelligence affect culture?

    LC: Well, like I said before, if – the culture is going to be defined by the mission of the organization, the purpose or the why behind the organization and the values of the organization, how we conduct ourselves. So that’s going to be the guiding principles and in order to achieve that we have to figure out how you and I work together and policies and procedures may not cover that, because we’re not going to talk about, “Yes, you need to turn this in to me by four, you can’t turn it in to me by five because I can’t get my job done,” that’s a policy and procedure. But how I interact with you. How I engage you to get the best out of you when I turn that thing in at four. That is going to be developing the culture because that has to do with the relationship dynamic that you and I have – the trust and the vulnerability that you and I share, and if we can do that and I can communicate that in a way that is clear and articulate to influence you to get the best out of you, that’s that intangible feeling you get when you walk into an organization and it feels good to be there. Versus you walk into some organization and it just feels dead inside.

    HOST: Yeah.

    LC: And that’s all the company’s culture, that the experience of dealing with the organization – whether from the outside in as a client or as somebody that’s contracted to them or as the employees when they walk into the organization, how they feel about themselves when they walk in. How they feel about their direct reports or the people that they work with – their peers or their subordinates. All of that is going to be the development of their culture and emotional intelligence is going to say, “Well if you can understand yourself then you can understand how to align with that company culture so that we are all rowing in that same direction.

    HOST: In that same direction. Yes, that’s fascinating! So, do you believe organizations with high emotional intelligence have stronger brand loyalty?

    LC:  Without a doubt, so go back to this feeling of culture. And if we can see the Domino effect of if you have high EQ within an organization – the individuals – therefore their culture is strong and if their culture is strong, they’re creating an experience that has healthy, engaging, interesting, happy…

    HOST: Motivated.

    LC: It’s motivating. It’s juicy, it feels good. So that’s the experience that the employees are having, but also those that are buying whatever product or service from that organization. So, they feel good about working with that company or dealing with that company. Like take Apple, right? They have a Genius Bar. Like how cool is that? They don’t have customer service; they have a Genius Bar. So, I feel cool walking in and going to a Genius bar and talking with a Genius about my iPhone.

    HOST: Yeah.

    LC: And then I feel even cooler because I walk into

    • 16 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Lindon Crow – Part One

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Lindon Crow – Part One

    Good leaders know how to manage a team. Great leaders know how to manage themselves – their own thoughts and emotions, to better manage others. In today’s episode of The 19: Entrepreneur Edition, we sit down with Productive Learning President Lindon Crow to discuss the value that this skill, known as emotional intelligence, can have on a team’s productivity, morale, conflict-resolution and communication.

    MUSIC intro

    Recorded Intro:

    This is The 19. In 19 minutes or less, game-changing insights from Orange Label, the leading response marketing agency for established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset.

    Hello and welcome back to The 19: Entrepreneur Edition! I’m Rochelle Reiter, President of Orange Label. We’re kicking off our first podcast of the new year with a two-part series on emotional intelligence. Listed by the World Economic Forum as a top job skill to have in 2020, emotional intelligence is about recognizing your own emotions to better manage interpersonal relationships. When used in business, this concept can create a better brand experience for companies and their customers. For over 20 years, personal development company Productive Learning has taught business leaders how to utilize emotional intelligence to create powerful cultures and brands. Here to tell us more about the relationship between emotional intelligence and the modern workplace is Productive Learning President, Lindon Crow. Lindon, welcome to The 19. We’re so excited to have you here today!

    LC: Thank you, I’m excited to be here!

    HOST: Awesome! Well, tell me a little about your career path and background.

    LC: Sure, so if we go all the way back, I grew up I have two sisters and I have all female cousins. So growing up I started taking on a bit of the characteristic of an inquisitive person, a skeptical person wanting to understand why. And really, it was quite natural, right? I wanted to understand why all of these girls wanted to play house and tea, and didn’t want to play Frisbee and tag. I just didn’t get it.

    Fast forward 20 years in college and I go into a psychology class and I realize, “Oh, that’s the mechanics of how the mind/body work. So that must be dictating how we make choices and decisions.” Now, I don’t think that I was thinking in college back to when I was young, but that kind of inquisitive nature as to why do people do what they do, I think that’s been with me for a long time. So, then I studied psychology, wanting to understand how the mechanics of the mind and body and emotions work. Also walked into a religious studies course, which I found fascinating because essentially that’s like the fuel that you put into the person – all the doctrines and dogma that they believe. So, now you’ve got the mechanics of the mind and the system, and you have the fuel that you put into the system and I found that kind of combination fascinating.

    Fast forward a handful of years later, I walk into my first workshop and the workshop was with Productive Learning. Instead of talking about the world out there and how they function and what they believe about what’s going on in their system, they said, why don’t you look at yourself and try to figure you out? And that’s where I said, “Oh, woah, I don’t know that world at all.” So, that had me hooked. That was about 2010. So I started with Productive Learning in 2010.

    HOST: Explain the value that Productive Learning provides to the corporate environment.

    LC: Sure, so all of our work has a foundation in emotional intelligence. So, we’ll do workshops and seminars, or coaching, with executives. It could be departmental; it could be with the entire company and really what we’re doing is helping the individual understand themselves better as a system. If you knew how your car functioned better, then your car would be better gas

    • 18 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Patty Vogan

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Patty Vogan

    Author, speaker and business coach Patty Vogan dove into her dreams, quite literally, when she moved to the Kingdom of Tonga to open her own scuba diving business. An experience she wouldn’t trade for the world, Patty returned to the United States after seven successful years with lessons on business, culture and personal resilience that she shares with us on this episode of The 19: Entrepreneur Edition.

     

    MUSIC Intro

    Recorded Intro:

    This is The 19. In 19 minutes or less, game-changing insights from Orange Label, the leading response marketing agency for established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset.

    Host Intro:

    Hi, I’m Rochelle Reiter, president of Orange Label. After three inspirational installments in The 19: Entrepreneur series, we’re excited to discuss expert leadership insights with author, speaker and Victory Coaching International founder Patty Vogan. As chair of Vistage International’s CEO advisory board, Patty specializes in out of the box thinking to help CEOs, executives, and teams accelerate their growth and effectiveness. With strong beliefs in the power of possibility thinking and serving the community, Patty’s desire to help leaders reach their goals started with accomplishing her own childhood dream of opening a scuba diving and whale watching business in Tonga. Here to share her life experiences and leadership knowledge with us today is Patty Vogan.

    Rochelle: Patty, welcome to The 19, we’re so happy to have you.

    Patty: Thanks, Rochelle. I’m happy to be here.

    Rochelle: So Patty, tell us a little bit about your background and please don’t leave out anything about your adventure in Tonga.

    Patty: Well, I’ve been a business coach for about 17 years, and a Vistage Chair and speaker for 14. And I’ve actually been speaking since I was 14 years old. It was Mrs. Stathis, it was her fault. She was my speech teacher.

    Rochelle: Oh my gosh.

    Patty: She made me compete at 14 and I said, “I don’t do that, that’s what the nerdy kids do.” And she said “you’re doing it.” So somehow or another I’ve been speaking, I think, my whole life.

    Rochelle: So did you feel like you were a natural when you were little?

    Patty: No, I didn’t at all. But she seemed to have seen something in me, and kinda kicked me, and put me out there.

    Rochelle: It’s cool to have people see things in you and challenge you.

    Patty: Yeah. I think I’ve learned the most, though, from my adventures in Tonga. I didn’t want to be 90 years old and doing the, “I wish I woulda, shoulda, coulda dance.” And it was a dream of mine to have a scuba diving business in the tropics since I was about 14. So I left my fast-paced Orange County life. I put my life in a 20×20 container, and I moved to the South Pacific Islands, the Kingdom of Tonga. I started a business in a third-world country. And, you know, when people who live on Hawaii say that they get island fever, I must tell you I laugh. They don’t know what rock fever is until you go out into the middle of the South Pacific where there are only a few people.

    Rochelle: How long were you there?

    Patty: I lived there for seven years, and I started the business ground-floor up. I laid the cement slabs myself.

    Rochelle: Wow.

    Patty: And I started the scuba diving business, then went to whale watching, and then sport fishing. And it was, I tell you, just so incredible. If you offered me, Rochelle, five million dollars right now and said, “You cannot have that experience, but I’ll give you $5 million,” I wouldn’t take it.

    Rochelle: Why?

    Patty: I wouldn’t take it because the things I learned about culture, you can’t learn anywhere else. The things I learned about business and personal resilience I learned because of the experiences I had there. I’ve been in the water with baby humpback whales, I’ve been the first perso

    • 17 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Amy K – Part Two

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Amy K – Part Two

    In Part 2 of our podcast with author and business strategist Amy K., we have an authentic conversation about how to overcome the real-world challenges and fears that brand leaders face daily in order to remain relevant to the modern-day, savvy consumer.

     

    MUSIC Intro

    Recorded Intro:

    This is The 19. In 19 minutes or less, game-changing insights from Orange Label, the leading response marketing agency for established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset.

    Host Intro:

    Hi, this is Rochelle Reiter, agency principal at Orange Label. Last week, in part one of our dynamic interview with Amy K, we talked all about personal branding and the power of storytelling. Today, in part twoAmy K shares her strategies for staying authentic in a world of sales, and overcoming some of leadership’s biggest challenges.

    Rochelle: Amy K, welcome back to the 19.

    Amy K: Thanks for having me back. It’s a true privilege to talk with you.

    Rochelle: So we had so much great insight on your part one podcast. Now we’re gonna talk about selling. So how do you develop a brand message that is both authentic and sales driven, in your opinion?

    Amy K: You know, it’s a provocative question because consumers are far more sophisticated, and they’re super busy, and they tolerate a lot less than they used to. And so, developing a brand message that really resonates is not overcomplicating it. It’s really about simplifying it, and hitting people with the raw reality of that life is tough. And that life is complicated, and here is a solution to make life easier. Or to make life more comfortable or to solve your problem. So, one of the things that I think that we’re seeing a lot with our own clients and their brand message is that they’re simplifying a lot to be heard above the fray. But they’re also hitting people with pain points. And I don’t mean the cheesy “what keeps you up at night,” but more along the emotional oomph, that vulnerability of “we get you.” The minute that a brand story can say “we get you,” you’re gonna have a lot of people intrigued in what it is you’re actually selling.

    Rochelle: Sure, it’s really about developing that connection – that emotional connection. 

    Amy K: Yes. In fact a lot of times, I’ll even say to folks in sales, I’ll say, “It’s not about the classic elevator pitch.” Elevator pitch is 40 years old. Now it’s elevator connect. And even though that sounds a little trite, it’s not. It’s really about the idea of, if you can find a point of relatability and connection, you’ve already separated yourself from the pack of cheesy pitches.

    Rochelle: I love that. Instead of a speech, it’s so much more real.

    Amy K: It is. And it’s usually about putting your message aside long enough to ask somebody a question. So, one of things that I’ll do in an elevator connect scenario – and I spend a lot of time networking, because I travel all over. I’m at events all the time. If somebody will say, “Oh I’m an engineer,” “Oh, I’m an architect,” and instead of going in the where do you work and how long, is I will immediately say, “Well, what does it feel like, to be an architect in today’s crazy world?” or “What does it feel like, to be a veterinarian in today’s crazy world?” And you know what’s fascinating? This conversation elevates and shifts so fast, because now you’re having a deeper conversation than like where do you work and what do you do and how long have you been doing it.

    Rochelle: Yeah, you’re talking about feelings and emotions. What would you say to brand leaders who are perceived as being annoying or inauthentic in their marketing?

    Amy K: Well, haters gonna hate. Judgers gonna judge, and so let them judge. But let them judge you being you. So, one of the things is that if we try to be everything to everybody, a

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Amy K – Part One

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Amy K – Part One

    In author and business strategist Amy K. Hutchens’ years of personal branding experience, two things ring true: you need to engage in tough conversations in order to grow and you need to know how to tell the right story about your brand. So, where do you start? Find out in Part One of The 19: Entrepreneur Edition.

     

    MUSIC Intro

    Recorded Intro:

    This is The 19. In 19 minutes or less, game-changing insights from Orange Label, the leading response marketing agency for established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset.

    Host Intro:

    Hi there, this is Rochelle Reiter, agency principal at Orange Label. Today on The 19, we’re thrilled to bring you another installment of our entrepreneur and leadership series, and this time with none other than the incredible speaker, author, and business strategist Amy K Hutchens. Now I’ve had the pleasure of seeing Amy K speak and I’m absolutely blown away by her vivacious energy and profound insights. From communication to culture, leadership to sales, Amy K’s innovative real-world tools streamline and enhance businesses at every level. She has been named Vistage UK’s International Speaker of the Year, and has helped thousands of executives in over ten countries ignite brilliance and generate results.

    Rochelle: Amy K, welcome to The 19. We’re so excited to have you.

    Amy K: I’m excited to be here, thank you for inviting me.

    Rochelle: Amy K, tell us about your background. What led you to become a speaker, an author, a trainer, and a business strategist?

    Amy K: One of the things that I think has been a common thread throughout my whole life is teaching and learning. So when I was really little I was playing school with imaginary students. And when that became “so not cool,” I was an intern in high school and actually working in an elementary school classroom. I became an elementary school teacher. Then I became a teacher trainer, and then I became a national speaker. And so, a lot of times people will say “Oh my God, did you ever think you would end up being this entrepreneur, and running your own company?” And twenty some years ago I would have been like “no, never!” But what it is it’s just the evolution of me, continuing to do what I love, which is to teach and to learn.

    Rochelle: Oh, that’s awesome. What are your favorite topics to talk about with other business leaders?

    Amy K: I spend the majority of my time talking about how hard communication is and how much we struggle with it. And yet one of the things that I sincerely believe and I don’t mean this in any cheesy way, and that is that life is happening one conversation at a time, and the quality of our lives is a direct reflection of the quality of our conversations. And so most of the time, I am working with leaders on the conversations – the tough ones – that they are either attempting, or avoiding every single day.

    Rochelle: Are there some common themes that come up? I have to imagine that there are.

    Amy K: There are. And you know, some of them are the outward ones that we can all identify with in terms of having the tough conversation around a lack of performance or a lack of productivity, or an unhealthy culture, or mergers and acquisitions, and successfully navigating change or not so much. But then there’s also the much more personal ones that are happening with me, myself, and I. And that doesn’t sound strange when I explain that, you know everyday we are having internal conversations about, are we good enough, and do we know enough and are we creative enough, are we networked enough, do we have enough energy, do we have too much energy, do they like me, do they not, are they judging, are they not. And so, I work a lot with leaders on that internal mindset as well.

    Rochelle: Yeah. Let’s talk about personal branding. You mentioned to me in an earlier conver

    • 17 min
    The Secrets of the Sharp Experience – Part Two

    The Secrets of the Sharp Experience – Part Two

    Chief Marketing Officer Jim Nuckols’ mission is to consumer-ize Sharp Healthcare; to find out exactly what customers want and need, instead of just assuming. In Part Two of our interview with Nuckols, we discuss the crucial consumer initiative and how it’s changing the way clinicians and hospital operations deliver care.

     

    Host: Hi, it’s Michelle Torr again, Account Director at Orange Label. In our last episode of The 19: Healthcare, Part One with Sharp Healthcare’s Chief Marketing Officer Jim Nuckols talked about how the Sharp Experience guides the health system’s marketing strategy from media to messaging to measurement. Today on Part Two, we’re going one level deeper beyond marketing to the philosophy and practical application of healthcare consumerism. Jim’s extensive background in consumer products and software has propelled Sharp to be a pioneer in this very space. Hi Jim, thank you so much for joining us on The 19 Part Two.

    Jim: Great to be here! I love talking about healthcare and marketing together.

    Host: Well let’s start by telling us a little about your background. How did you get into the healthcare space?

    Jim: I actually started my career in consumer marketing. I was at General Mills, I ran the Wheaties brand for a number of years. Actually signed Michael Jordan to Wheaties.

    Host: Wow!

    Jim: I made Michael Jordan.

    Host: That is so cool!

    Jim: And ran the Nature Valley brand, and then after about eight years I ended up in the medical equipment business with a company called Hill-Rom, who does 90% of the hospital beds in the US and ran strategy and ended up acquiring a French company that was in our industry to grow. I ended up spending five years in France, all in medical devices with Cardinal Health, Apexus, a lot of things around drug management, drug control, Alaris, which are infusion pumps, and even spent some time in the entrepreneurial world, helped introduce a new drug product and then came to the provider side, joined Sharp about seven years ago. So, when I sit at Sharp, when I first got to Sharp, I realized everything I had marketed in my past was now at Sharp: Hill-Rom beds, Apexus medication management, Alaris pumps and even Nature Valley granola bars were in the cafeteria. I guess it was all leading to Sharp.

    Host: Yeah, everything came full circle for you.

    Jim: But now I love running the provider side of healthcare. It’s a little bit different because you’re really now delivering care and making a difference for patients and also it’s a nonprofit. It’s just a different ethos than being on the corporate side.

    Host: It is, but I think what’s interesting about your background especially now with the buzz around healthcare consumerism and the shift to a more consumer-focused delivery of care, your background in consumer packaged goods and retail in a sense probably lends a lot of value to the retail space.

    Jim: I actually feel like my mission at Sharp is to consumerize Sharp and so that has been a lot of my focus. Sharp is a really brand and presence in San Diego, but as you mentioned you know making health care much more consumer friendly is crucial and that’s my background and that’s my interest and so everything we can do to make Sharp more relevant, more convenient, more consumer-focused is kind of where I’ve put my emphasis and so even changing the way we organize, the way we approach it, it’s actually been somewhat of a shock to the system at Sharp. I mean, I’m just kind of a different beast, I didn’t grow up on the provider side of healthcare, which most marketers in this industry have, including most of my staff. So, I think I do bring a very different perspective.

    Host: What would you say are some of your top or your favorite or your most exciting initiatives where you’ve been able to push that consumer focus into the Sharp organization?

    Jim:

    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

Astr12 ,

Quick listen

Love the format and that I can quickly listen in during my morning commute. And I’m enjoying the content... I look forward to hearing more!

YapoD3VQ3y ,

Really Quick Retail Insights

Wow, I really enjoyed this podcast! The host is engaging and the interviewees are thoughtful in their responses- this podcast provided me with a new perspective into marketing. I’m so looking forward to the next episode!

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