44 episodes

Orange Label Advertising

The 19 Retail Orange Label

    • Business
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Orange Label Advertising

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Robert Rose

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Robert Rose

    Great content marketing delivers value to an audience, independent of the brand that created it. This nugget was shared by Robert Rose, Chief Strategy Advisor of The Content Marketing Institute in our latest podcast. From capturing first-party data to measuring KPIs, this episode will help you further develop your 2023 content marketing strategy to be a valuable resource for your audience.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:00:00] This is The 19 a podcast that delivers marketing insights from Orange Label in 19 minutes or less. This year, the agency is celebrating fifty years of working with established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset. What does this mean for you? It means enriched conversations and stories with marketing and leadership experts aimed at improving lives.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:00:28] Hello and welcome to The 19: Entrepreneur Edition! I’m Rochelle Reiter, President of Orange Label. I read a quote in Publisher’s Weekly recently that said, “Content is the engine that drives visibility.” What I love about this quote is that it emphasizes just how important content is in your marketing strategy. If your content is driving your visibility, you want that engine to be reliable. You don’t want to churn out content that sputters out just after a few clicks. As the Content Marketing Institute says, it’s about creating and distributing valuable, relevant and consistent content that attracts a clearly defined audience and ultimately drives action specializing in content, longevity, strategy and creation. The Content Marketing Institute has been an industry leading resource for over a decade, and today we’re so excited to speak with the institute’s Chief Strategy Advisor, Robert Rose. Robert has worked on content strategy for global brands, including Capital One, NASA, Dell, McCormick Spices and Microsoft, and he’s even written three books on marketing. Without further ado, here he is. Robert, welcome to The 19.

    Robert Rose: [00:01:32] Oh, thank you so much for having me. Great to be here.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:01:39] So you’ve been with the Content Marketing Institute for over ten years. Can you tell us about your role as Chief Strategy Advisor?

    Robert Rose: [00:01:46] Well, sure. It’s funny, I started as Chief Strategy Officer, and that was back when we were quite literally four people. And I met this guy, Joe Pulizzi, back in 2009, 2008, and we met at a conference and we started talking about content marketing. And we were we were, we were birds of a feather and fast friends immediately. And the interesting thing is, is that he was just starting Content Marketing Institute at that time, and I was just coming off of a CMO role. And the whole thing was, can we evangelize this new process called content marketing in larger enterprises? And so it started out really my role there is was sort of the Chief Strategy Officer to half my job was to help the organization grow and get bigger and do all the things that it wanted to do around events and media and all those things. And then the second half was I built a consulting and education division for the company to build a curriculum, as well as a consulting practice to help bigger brands be able to bring this whole content marketing thing to life. And then in 2016, post acquisition, I was no longer an employee of the company, but I stayed partnered with the organization. Joe rode off into the sunset and started writing novels and doing his thing, and I basically stuck around and had a job and they didn’t want any of the consulting or the or the education part of it. So I spun up my own little company called Content Advisory and still partner with CMI for the event and the media and the strategy part of the engagement. And basically that is my role these days with, with Content Marketing Institute because I lost the officer part of the title,

    • 19 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Kayla Mueller Part 2

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Kayla Mueller Part 2

    When searching for influencers for your brand, it’s easy to get wrapped up in the number of followers they have. Pause and let the follower count drift to the background. Are they producing creative, quality content? Do (real) people comment on their posts? Are they already posting about your brand or engaging with it? Jackpot! Influencer expert Kayla Mueller shares how to get scrappy with your influencer marketing strategy by identifying who you want to work with, knowing how to measure ROI and staying away from distractions in part two of our podcast.

    Chelsea Ragland: [00:00:00] This is The 19, a podcast that delivers marketing insights from Orange Label in 19 minutes or less. This year, the agency is celebrating 50 years of working with established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset. What does this mean for you? It means in rich conversations and stories with marketing and leadership experts aimed at improving lives.

    Chelsea Ragland: [00:00:28] Welcome back to the 19 with Kayla Mueller, Senior Creative Strategist at Popular Pays, a Lightricks Company. In part one of the podcast, we discuss the value of influencer marketing. For part two, we’ll be sharing tips to identify influencers that resonate with your brand and insights on how to track campaign performance.

    Chelsea Ragland: [00:00:51] What are some tips for identifying influencers that resonate with your target audience?

    Kayla Mueller: [00:00:55] Influencer marketing, if you haven’t done it before, can be very overwhelming and the more work you put in, like the pre-work and the planning of finding the right influencer creator, the better it’s going to be all around for everybody. Brands, take a look and they’re like, this is the type of creator we want. Well, first, let’s look at sales data, like, who’s buying this? Who is your audience? Like, sometimes brand teams, agency are like, this is the target demo. And we’re like, Are you sure? Because if they are, that’s totally cool. We will go with that. That’s amazing. But if you have any sales data or, you know, hey, most of my audience is in California, for example, let’s just look at creators who are in California and like look at if most of their audience is there or if a product is only available in a certain place, let’s just focus on that. So I think just taking a step back, that’s like a theme in most of my answers is take a step back and like really think about it and be intentional. So once you know who that audience is and you’re engaging the right people. Search for creators so you can use software tools like Popular Pays. Where I work, you can work with agencies like Orange Label, you can work with both at the same time, and then you can even get scrappy.So based on like your resources and your time, you can look in the platforms yourself. You can search for people talking about your competitors. If you want to take that approach, you can search for people talking about a specific like category or vertical that you’re in, and they may be a thought leader there. So there are ways to get scrappy like in the platform just based on. Kind of what your resources are. Even I would search for like branded hashtags. You can do that in the platform. Anybody has access in TikTok and Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest to search for brands in there and like, see what’s popping up. Who’s already talking about your brand? I think we’ve definitely seen a lot of successful campaigns even outside of my team where people are already talking about a brand or product. So is that not a perfect fit, right, where you’re talking about a specific skin care, people already posting about it. They already have almost all every product in a line already.

    • 20 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Kayla Mueller Part 1

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Kayla Mueller Part 1

    Influencer marketing may not be for everybody. By the end of this podcast episode, you’ll know exactly what influencer marketing is, how brands benefit from it and how to decide whether it’s a fit for you. With spending on influencer marketing forecast to reach $5 billion in 2023, this is a must-listen podcast to plan your content strategy as we approach the fourth quarter. Tune into Part One of The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Kayla Mueller, Senior Creative Strategist at Popular Pays, a Lightricks Company, and Orange Label Social Media Supervisor Chelsea Ragland.

    Chelsea Ragland: [00:00:00] This is The 19, a podcast that delivers marketing insights from Orange Label in 19 minutes or less. This year, the agency is celebrating 50 years of working with established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset. What does this mean for you? It means enriched conversations and stories with marketing and leadership experts aimed at improving lives.

    Chelsea Ragland: [00:00:29] Kayla is the Senior Creative Strategist at Popular Pays, a Lightricks Company, and faculty associate at Arizona State’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. From Oscar Mayer’s viral face mask influencer campaign to stunning travel content for travel app Liist, Kayla is a creative force for content, curation and influencer strategy and has fun while doing it. Kayla, welcome to The 19!

    Kayla Mueller: [00:00:53] Thank you, Chelsea. I’m so excited to be here!

    Chelsea Ragland: [00:01:00] Awesome. Can you tell us a little bit about your background in digital advertising and influencer marketing?

    Kayla Mueller: [00:01:06] Definitely. I was first drawn to advertising. I had an email internship and I loved advertising. I thought it was incredible how you could target different people. And then after that, after school, I went and worked in paid search for a few years at a big agency. That was a really cool experience, and then I found myself at a boutique PR firm. So there I was, kind of leading social media strategy photoshoots, social calendar planning, a lot of different things and influencer marketing there as well. And then I kind of found myself now at Popular Pays, a Lightricks Company, where I’m a Senior Creative Strategist and I make a lot of RFPs for brands. I’m sure we’ll get more into what my specific role looks like, but it is really humbling to be in the world of digital. I think it’s almost been eight years at this point and it’s really cool to see how it has evolved and it’s just a really exciting space to be these days. So, I’m really grateful.

    Chelsea Ragland: [00:02:10] Absolutely. And we’ve seen such great success with our clients’ influencer marketing campaigns. For those that may be unfamiliar, how would you define influencer marketing?

    Kayla Mueller: [00:02:20] Yeah, that’s a good question because we talk about those words. We use some of these words all the time. There’s so many marketing and advertising buzzwords. So I think it’s so important to kind of take a step back and revisit what those words are. I think at its core, to simplify, influencer marketing is word-of-mouth advertising. It’s hearing that a friend has bought something and it makes you want to buy it or learn more about it. And it’s kind of that referral and testimonial type of process. So it’s really, at the end of the day, partnering with humans, people, and gathering testimonials from them to promote a product or service. And I think one reason why influencer marketing is so successful and why influencers are so helpful to a marketing strategy is that it’s a human testimonial, right? So it’s, it’s humans and people talking about a brand or service instead of just a brand,

    • 16 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Sprout Social's

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Sprout Social's

    For nearly a decade, the Sprout Social Index has gathered data on social media marketing to help brands better connect with their audience. The most recent Index interviews 1,000 US consumers and 500 US marketers to reveal the top trends on social media in 2022 and insight into what’s to come. Listen to our exclusive interview with Sprout Social’s Senior Market Research Manager Mike Blight and Orange Label Social Media Specialist Samantha Hernandez for more!

    Samantha Hernandez: [00:00:00] This is The 19, a podcast that delivers marketing insights from Orange Label in 19 minutes or less. This year, the agency is celebrating 50 years of working with established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset. What does this mean for you? It means enriched conversations and stories with marketing and leadership experts aimed at improving lives.

    Samantha Hernandez: [00:00:29] Hello and welcome to the 19 Entrepreneur Edition. I’m Samantha Hernandez, Social Media Specialist at Orange Label. One of the things I love most about social media marketing is building genuine connections with the brand and their audience. How and where these connections are built evolves frequently. The annual Sprout Social Index helps us visualize just how much social media changes each year and gives projected trends for the years to come. To put things into perspective, when the Index launched in 2013, Instagram had just introduced video capabilities, Facebook had a launch in a new timeline with video autoplay, and the six-second video sharing app Vine was nearing its peak. Nine years later, new features occur at least monthly on apps, and key social media players have changed. Nevertheless, video remains a key emphasis of social media strategies. Here to share insights from the latest Index to help brands best connect with their audience is Sprout Social Senior Market Research Manager Mike Blight. Mike, welcome to The 19. It’s great to have you today!

    Mike Blight: [00:01:27] Thanks for having me.

    Samantha Hernandez: [00:01:32] Awesome. So, Mike, you’re the Senior Market Research Manager at Sprout. Can you tell us a bit about yourself and your role?

    Mike Blight: [00:01:38] Yeah, my title basically tells you nothing about what I actually do. We are a very data-driven company. On the content side, we’ve been investing significantly, as in my role as well, into using data in a more meaningful way and all the content that we produce. So a significant part of what I do is help drive data-driven projects like the Index, everything from data collection to analysis to helping our content team package all that together.

    Samantha Hernandez: [00:02:08] Awesome. So speaking of the Index, can you tell us about it?

    Mike Blight: [00:02:11] Yeah, the Index is even before joining Sprout and I know this is going to sound like a product placement, but the Index is one of my favorite things on social. Sprout has been doing the Index since 2013. So this is the ninth year of trend forecasting. And so this particular Index, we surveyed over 1,000 US customers and 500 US social marketers between ages of 18 and 75.

    Samantha Hernandez: [00:02:36] Wow. What was the most surprising stat from this year’s Sprout Index?

    Mike Blight: [00:02:40] We have, and this is going to require you to download the full report. So thanks for giving us your email ahead of time.

    Samantha Hernandez: [00:02:47] Yeah, we got it.

    Mike Blight: [00:02:48] Since 2019, we’ve been tracking what marketers are describing as the challenges that they face when it comes to their social media teams. And year over year, we see things like providing some sort of ROI or social execution, resourcing, these being primary pain points. This year in 2022, finding the right talent rose to the top of all of those. It’s not to say that proving ROI is not a challenge still, but of all the things,

    • 14 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Heidi Kirby

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Heidi Kirby

    There are some podcasts that leave you so motivated, you find yourself nodding along with them. This is one of them. In this new episode of The 19: Entrepreneur Edition, Olympian Lina Taylor shares the very same tips that she used to develop her personal brand. From finding clarity in your vision to sharing your story, we hope that she leaves you as motivated and inspired to create as she left us.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:00:00] This is The 19, a podcast that delivers marketing insights from Orange Label in 19 minutes or less. This year, the agency is celebrating 50 years of working with established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset. What does this mean for you? It means enriched conversations and stories with marketing and leadership experts aimed at improving lives.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:00:30] Hello and welcome to The 19: Entrepreneur Edition! I’m Rochelle Reiter, President of Orange Label. Today, we’re talking about personal branding. Well, this may not feel like it pertains to you when you take away the formality of the name. The core of it is how you market yourself. Our guest today, Lina Taylor, is a two time Olympian Volleyball player who utilized lessons of resilience from her life and sports career to build her personal brand as an executive coach. Her work in promoting her story and mindset has led her to speaking events and workshops for companies including Shopify, American Red Cross, Zendesk, Google and more. And now she’s here to inspire your personal brand. Lina, welcome to The 19. We’re so excited to have you here today!

    Lina Taylor: [00:01:12] Thank you for having me, Rochelle. I’m really excited to be here.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:01:19] So it’s not often that we get to speak with an Olympian athlete on The 19. Can you tell us a little bit about your transition from Olympian to entrepreneur?

    Lina Taylor: [00:01:28] It’s definitely a transition, just like any other major transition in life. You experience a sense of a loss of identity in the way that you have been before, but it gives you a chance to reinvent yourself. And so what I’ve learned through going through several transitions like this is I started making a list of the things that I would be doing if I wasn’t playing, if I wasn’t a professional beach volleyball player anymore. And I remember earlier in my twenties when there was a time when I couldn’t think of anything else that I wanted to do more than just hop on the next plane, take me to a beautiful setting and playing a tournament. That’s all I wanted to do. But once I had done that for about ten years and played in two Olympics, now I started making less. What else would I be doing with my gifts, with the things that I want to offer the world? And when that list started getting pretty long, I decided it’s time to jump. It’s time to change ships.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:02:22] What a fascinating way to do that. What an exploration. I think everyone should do that.

    Lina Taylor: [00:02:30] Don’t wait until you’re in your late forties or fifties.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:02:33] Yeah, I’ve never heard it explained that way. That’s great. So at what point did you realize that you could take your story and build a personal brand from it?

    Lina Taylor: [00:02:42] That’s a great question. It was the beginning of the pandemic, and what I had is I’ve always kept a journal for myself, but I had started keeping a journal for each one of our three kids. And so I had the three journals for the kids. I had a travel journal for us. I had my own journal. And I was kind of thinking, I need to figure out a way to write a better story or tell a better story. Tell it in a way, because I didn’t I didn’t have time to keep up.

    • 20 min
    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Heidi Kirby

    The 19: Entrepreneur Edition with Heidi Kirby

    More content, connections and creative control – a branded podcast can deliver all three of these things, plus the ability to showcase yourself as a brand leader. Whether your podcast is short or long, entertaining or informative, it’s all about the content that will resonate most with your audience. Make your podcast specific, make your podcast valuable and, with these tips from Podcast Professor and Learning/Development Expert Heidi Kirby, make your podcast now.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:00:00] This is The 19, a podcast that delivers marketing insights from Orange Label in 19 minutes or less. This year, the agency is celebrating 50 years of working with established brands that are driven by a fearless entrepreneurial mindset. What does this mean for you? It means enriched stories and conversations with marketing and leadership experts aimed at improving lives.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:00:29] Hello and welcome to The 19: Entrepreneur Edition! I’m Rochelle Reiter, President of Orange Label. In the five years that we’ve hosted The 19, we’ve had the opportunity to connect with experts on a variety of topics, from company culture to brand photography and how to deliver the best experiences for your brand. The one thing I love about podcasts is that they can teach you something new very clearly. I’m not the only one who loves podcasts. Statista estimates that listenership will reach 160 million in the US in 2023. Our Social media Specialist, Samantha, is studying to get her Masters in Mass Communication and social media marketing, and she connected us with a professor who shares the team’s affinity for podcasts and has a deep understanding of the opportunities that they hold for brands. Without further ado, here’s Learning and development professional and University of Florida professor Heidi Kirby. Heidi, welcome to The 19. We’re so excited to have you here today!

    Heidi Kirby: [00:01:25] Thanks for having me. I’m glad to be here.

    Rochelle Reiter: [00:01:32] So can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your experience with podcasting?

    Heidi Kirby: [00:01:37] Yeah, so podcasting comes to me by way of my working experience. And so I started my career as a college professor and eventually, after several years, moved into still learning and still education, but in the corporate space, right? So corporate training. And while I was making that career shift, I was listening to a lot of industry podcasts. But then as somebody who is creating learning experiences for people at organizations, I quickly recognized it as a method to help my learners and another way to deliver information. And so I think it was at three different organizations where I pitched with varying levels of seriousness, a podcast at those different organizations. But it was for a small pre-seed startup that was building a mobile learning management system that I finally had my, my podcast, my podcast baby was born. And so we were trying to build and promote this mobile learning management system. And I said, Well, we need to hit the people in the industry who are going to buy this. Let’s do a podcast and then just have the product be an ad spot. But in the podcast, just talk about learning and development so that people know that we know what we’re talking about. So that’s how my podcast was born, and I ended up not continuing my contract with that startup, but I ended up keeping the podcast. And so it’s now become like a personal thing and it’s still going. And recently one of my colleagues in the field, TA, is an instructional designer for University of Florida, said, Hey, will you teach podcasting at University of Florida? And my first reaction was to me, yeah. And then I thought about it and I was like, Well, I do have a podcast and I have taught college before and I do have a grad degree.

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

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Quick listen

Love the format and that I can quickly listen in during my morning commute. And I’m enjoying the content... I look forward to hearing more!

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Wow, I really enjoyed this podcast! The host is engaging and the interviewees are thoughtful in their responses- this podcast provided me with a new perspective into marketing. I’m so looking forward to the next episode!