119 episodes

The Apocalyptic Gospel Podcast explores the Gospel as a first-century Jew would have understood it. A conversation about the Gospel, the Kingdom of God, or the Day of the Lord in the first century would have evoked a body of ideas not immediately present with a simple word study of these terms. In this weekly podcast, a pastor, campus minister, and missionary mine the Torah, Biblical Prophets, and Second Temple writings for the origin and development of these ideas as we help give context to this first-century Jewish message and encourage disciples of Jesus to boldly proclaim it and patiently wait for the God of Israel to fulfill his covenantal promises.

The Apocalyptic Gospel Podcast The Apocalyptic Gospel

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.9 • 211 Ratings

The Apocalyptic Gospel Podcast explores the Gospel as a first-century Jew would have understood it. A conversation about the Gospel, the Kingdom of God, or the Day of the Lord in the first century would have evoked a body of ideas not immediately present with a simple word study of these terms. In this weekly podcast, a pastor, campus minister, and missionary mine the Torah, Biblical Prophets, and Second Temple writings for the origin and development of these ideas as we help give context to this first-century Jewish message and encourage disciples of Jesus to boldly proclaim it and patiently wait for the God of Israel to fulfill his covenantal promises.

    S4E24: The Parable of the Shepherd and the Gate

    S4E24: The Parable of the Shepherd and the Gate

    In this episode we discuss Jesus’ “illustration” of the shepherd and the gate from John 10:1-18. Jesus speaks these words in response to the negative reaction by the religious leaders to the healing of blind man (9:40). Akin to the parable of the lost sheep, Jesus invokes Israel’s prophetic indictment of self-serving leadership. As the “good shepherd,” Jesus asserts his messianic role as the eschatological Davidic shepherd (Eze 34; Ps Sol 17).


    Show notes


    The Gospel of John and the Memra tradition - Genesis 15; Jeremiah 1; Psalm 119; Psalm 33:6; Proverbs 8 (3:53) Parables/illustrations in John (14:34) The apocalyptic context of John 10:1-18 (18:40) Shepherd/sheep in Jewish literature - Jeremiah 50:6-7; Psalms of Solomon 17:21; 39-42; Ezekiel 34:4, 23 (25:00) “Thieves and bandits” (28:10) “Abundant life” and the resurrection - John 5:28-29; 6:40, 54; 10:28; 11:25; 20:31 (34:09) One flock, one shepherd, and the regathering of the lost tribes - Ezekiel 37:15-28; Testament of Joseph 19; 1 Enoch 89:72; 4 Ezra 13:39-50 (37:57) Wrapping up (47:30)

    • 56 min
    S4E23: The Parable of the Persistent Widow

    S4E23: The Parable of the Persistent Widow

    In this episode we discuss the parable of the persistent widow from Luke 18. Jesus speaks this parable in context to the discussion of the sudden and apocalyptic coming of the messianic kingdom in Luke 17:20-37. As has been common throughout Jewish liturgical history, this parable is spoken to encourage faith and prayer for the coming of the Messiah and the day of the Lord.


    Show notes


    The apocalyptic context of the parable - Luke 17:20-37 (5:32) Allegory: the widow and the judge - Lamentations 1:1; Isaiah 54:4 (13:02) The “elect” in its covenantal context - Isaiah 65:9-22; 1 Enoch 1:8-9 (18:14) The delay and losing heart (22:18) Similar language in Second Temple literature - Sirach 35:14–25; 36:1-29 (28:35) Liturgy and the redemption of Israel - Isaiah 62:1-7; Amidah; Didache 10:5-6 (35:56) Modern approaches to the parable (47:35)

    • 55 min
    S4E22: The Parable of the Dishonest Manager

    S4E22: The Parable of the Dishonest Manager

    In this episode we discuss the parable of the dishonest manager from Luke 16. Within an apocalyptic context, the parable is quite simple and straightforward. The dishonest manager responds wisely in light of his own future judgment, whereas the “sons of this age” (v. 8) respond unwisely with their “unrighteous wealth” (v. 11), spending it on that which does not lead to “eternal dwellings” (v. 9) in the age to come.


    Show notes


    The apocalyptic context of the parable (4:42) Understanding allegory in the parables (8:43) “Shrewd”, “astute”, and “wise” (12:50) The unrighteous steward is actually the hero in the story (15:09) Background to the parable in the Tanakh and Second Temple literature - Sir 5:8; 29:10-11; 2 Baruch 44:9-15; 1 Enoch 63:9-10 (18:26) Modern approaches to the parable (27:36)

    • 34 min
    Q&A #12 with Bill, John, and Josh

    Q&A #12 with Bill, John, and Josh

    Bill, John, and Josh tackle your questions in this twelfth Q&A episode. Among many topics, we discuss dispensationalism, Galatians and circumcision, interacting with other disciples who hold to supersessionism and preterism, the idea of Jesus as a failed apocalyptic prophet, and how first century Jews understood “Abraham’s bosom”. 


    Show notes:


    How does your eschatology differ from the eschatology expounded upon in the Scofield Reference Bible? (2:27) How do you reconcile Paul’s discussion about circumcision having no value in Galatians with him circumcising Timothy in Acts? (19:03) How should we relate to pastors and other believers who teach supersessionism and preterism? (33:58) Can you help me understand why some New Testament scholars call Jesus a "failed apocalyptic prophet"? (42:30) How would first century Jews understand the concept of “Abraham’s bosom”? (54:01)

    • 1 hr 1 min
    S4E21: The Parables of Lost Things

    S4E21: The Parables of Lost Things

    In this episode we discuss the parables of the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the lost son found in Luke 15. Jesus uses familiar imagery in each of these parables to indict the religious leaders for their lack of concern for the sinners and marginalized within Israel. Particularly, the imagery of sheep/shepherds and God as Israel’s father were commonly known based on the covenant (Deut 32) and the prophetic tradition (Isa 63; Jer 50; Ezek 34; etc.). Rather than an individualized or ethnicized interpretation, these parables are best understood in an intra-Jewish (apocalyptic) context.


    Show notes


    The apocalyptic context of these parables (4:33) Shepherds and sheep in Jewish literature - Jeremiah 50:6-7; Ezekiel 34:1-6, 22-24; Psalms of Solomon 17:21, 39-42; Ex. Rab. 2:2 (10:29) Proleptic rejoicing in light of the messianic banquet - Isaiah 35:1-10 (25:54) The prophets and the parable of the lost son - Jeremiah 31:18-20 (30:09) Diaspora living among the Gentiles (33:40) Israel’s God as father - Deuteronomy 32:4-6; Isaiah 63:16, 64:18 (37:54) Modern approaches to the parables (42:09)

    • 57 min
    S4E20: The Parable of the Tower and the Army

    S4E20: The Parable of the Tower and the Army

    In this episode we discuss the parables of the Tower and the Army in Luke 14. As with his other parables, Jesus affirms the apocalyptic framework that was common in first century Judaism. He calls the crowds to persevering discipleship by "hating" one’s life and renouncing family, possessions, and security in order to “complete the tower” (Luke 14:28-29) and endure until the end and, thus, to inherit eternal life.


    Show notes


    The apocalyptic context of the parable (5:15) Semitic hyperbole: Jesus said to “hate” your own life - Malachi 1:2-3; Deuteronomy 33:8-9 (8:36) He “cannot be my disciple”: permission vs. ability unto perseverance (13:28) Bearing the cross - 2 Maccabees 7; Romans 8:17-18 (16:07) Building a tower and counting the cost (18:03) Renouncing everything in this age - Luke 12:33; Mark 10:21; Luke 18 (19:27) Salt and saltiness - Luke 9:62 (27:50) Modern approaches to the parable (31:25)

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
211 Ratings

211 Ratings

Ruthie's kid ,

This is the meat of the Word!

I’ve been doing intensive study for a while and there are so many viewpoints that ultimately didn’t make sense to me. What these guys are teaching makes everything in the Bible make sense, I don’t know how else to describe it. They have stripped away all the clutter of the doctrines of men and are teaching what the Word says in its’ original context. What utter clarity comes from that! They lay an excellent, totally-biblical foundation for the exposition. This has become my favorite podcast. Thank you, guys!

Jcardone ,

Interpreting the New Testament through this lens makes the most sense

Wow! Been in the faith for 23 years, been to Bible college, and have read the Bible 27 times from cover to cover. These fellows blow my mind. I’m convinced that these guy’s are on to something. I studied church history, and denominational doctrines my whole life. Encountering this podcast has changed my life, and the lives of the people around me. Do your selves an eternal favor, and listen to this podcast. I’m 27 episodes plus Q&A episodes deep, and will certainly be listening to all available episodes God willing.

Heavens11 92 chaplain ,

A majestic gift for those who wish to see

Phenomenal. Been living this paradigmical understanding for 30 years and so blessed to be affirmed by solid scholarship. I am sharing this show to all my friends and family. The good news properly rendered is a virtual goldmine of Spiritual Capital. Thank you a thousand times over for this amazing collaboration of synthesized truth.

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