60 episodes

The Cinematic Schematic is a multi-segment podcast dedicated to thoughtful, analysis-driven conversations on genre, independent and classic films from thecinematropolis.com. Hosted by Caleb Masters and a rotating cast of filmmakers, critics, and special guests, this podcast takes you through some of the most prominent themes and conversations occurring in cinema each month.

The Cinematic Schematic The Cinematropolis

    • TV & Film
    • 5.0 • 10 Ratings

The Cinematic Schematic is a multi-segment podcast dedicated to thoughtful, analysis-driven conversations on genre, independent and classic films from thecinematropolis.com. Hosted by Caleb Masters and a rotating cast of filmmakers, critics, and special guests, this podcast takes you through some of the most prominent themes and conversations occurring in cinema each month.

    Promising Young Woman – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Promising Young Woman – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Welcome back to The Cinematic Schematic, the official podcast of The Cinematropolis.com. Today I’ll be proving my review of Emerald Fennell’s directorial debut, Promising Young Woman. 







    DISCLAIMER: Potentially triggering topics including rape and sexual assault are a central part of the plot and themes of Promising Young Woman. If you are sensitive to these subjects, this review and the film may not be for you. Reader and listener discretion is advised. 







    According to IMDB Promising Young Woman is described as “A young woman, traumatized by a tragic event in her past, seeks out vengeance against those who cross her path.” The film is written/directed by Emerald Fennell and stars Carey Mulligan, Bo Burnham, and Allison Brie.







    Fennell’s directorial debut is a bold, sharp and oftentimes excruciating examination of the double standard between men and women, accusers and the accused and victims and their predators in our society. It’s a rape-revenge thriller that not only disregards your comfort, but actually relishes in your discontent. 







    In the midst of an ongoing culture war between a justice system that stands by the principle of innocent until proven guilty and a cancel culture that has taken to social media to demand retribution against sexual predators who have thus far been off the hook, what are the downsides to our current justice system, especially in the court of public opinion? And even more importantly, what are the human costs to the victims when the accused are allowed to walk away? 







    These are just a couple of the questions the film is most interested in exploring, and it does so in an intensely dramatic and even humorous fashion. 







    There are three things, in particular, I want to note about Promising Young Woman. 







    #1. This is another impactful addition to a growing line of powerful #MeToo Era films







    Following October 2017 when dozens of women came forward accusing Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment, assault, or even worse, the #MeToo movement emerged as a rallying cry for victims against sexual abuse, later followed by TIME’S UP. 







    In the years since we’ve seen several movies made on this topic from the perspectives of the women who step forward in the face of powerful predators. 







    In 2019 and 2020, we saw the releases of Bombshell, an adaptation of the accounts of women at Fox News who set out to expose CEO Roger Ailes of sexual harassment, The Assistant, a fictional story inspired by stories of women who survived encounters with Harvey Weinstein, and documentaries like On the Record and Athlete A that take on institutional sexism and sexual harassment. 







    Fennel is tackling these same ideas, themes, and social issues head-on without any apologies for how you may feel and more than a few laughs to keep you on your toes. Carey Mulligan’s character Cassie isn’t looking for healing or redemption, she’s out for vengeance against the men in her life who have harmed her and her loved ones. 







    #2. Even though the film was made in this post-MeToo context, it’s actually asking the audience to go even deeper.  







    At one point during the film, one of the male characters, Al played by Chris Lowell, claims “It’s every man’s worst nightmare to be accused,” to which Carrie Mulligan’s character Cassie responds “what do you think every woman’s worst nightmare is?”







    Promising Young Woman isn’t letting audiences off the hook without confronting that question. 







    Writer/director Emerald Fennell isn’t just playing out C...

    • 13 min
    Wonder Woman 1984 – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Wonder Woman 1984 – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    The Cinematic Schematic podcast returns for our final episode of 2020. This week we’ll review the long-delayed sequel to 2017’s smash hit, Wonder Woman, and the latest continuation of the DCEU, Wonder Woman 1984. We’re rejoined by recurring guest co-host, Freaky AF and You People writer/director, Laron Chapman, and Geek Girl Features writer Chelsea Ratterman, to provide a spoiler-free review of the film before having an in-depth spoiler discussion.







    In 2017, writer/director Patty Jenkins made her name in superhero filmmaking with the box office and critical success story, Wonder Woman. After bringing in a staggering $822 million worldwide and garnering the coveted “Fresh” Rotten Tomatoes score of 93%, the hopes and expectations for the follow-up couldn’t be higher. Enter the 2020 pandemic.







    After several short-term delays in late 2019, the film finally landed on a June 2020 date that would eventually be pushed several more times due to the pandemic before finally having a historical simultaneous HBO Max and theatrical opening on Christmas Day of this year. With Marvel pushing their entire theatrical release slate back until 2021, the appetite for a triumphant superhero film could not be greater. Does Wonder Woman 1984 meet the moment by rising above its already sky-high expectations?







    Tune in to our full The Cinematic Schematic conversation to get our reviews and recommendations for one of 2020’s final major releases.







    According to IMDB, Wonder Woman 1984 is described as:







    Rewind to the 1980s as Wonder Woman’s next big screen adventure finds her facing two all-new foes: Max Lord and The Cheetah.



















    Time Stamps







    0:15 – Introductions







    10:40 – Wonder Woman 1984 spoiler-free review







    38:17 – Spoiler discussion















    Special Guests























    Chelsea Ratterman







    Writer, Geek Girl Features







    Oklahoma Film Critics Circle Member







    Twitter @cinephilechels































    Guest Laron Chapman







    Writer / Director / Producer of You People







    Follow Laron on Twitter @THENAMESLARON















    Follow The Cinematic Schematic Podcast







    Hear all of this and more of our past and future episodes by subscribing to The Cinematic Schematic on your preferred podcast app and leaving us a rating on Apple Podcasts!







    Like The Cinematropolis on Facebook







    Follow The Cinematropolis on Twitter @thecinematrop

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Soul – The Cinematic Schematic Holiday Bonus Review

    Soul – The Cinematic Schematic Holiday Bonus Review

    Merry Christmas and happy holidays, dear listeners! The Cinematic Schematic podcast is here with a special bonus episode reviewing Disney Pixar’s new movie releasing directly on Disney+ on Christmas Day, Soul. To meet the special occasion, we are joined by my 2020 COVID-pandemic partner in crime, the Video Peach, Lauren Weingart. Tune in to hear our reactions and analysis of one of this year’s biggest holiday releases, being released exclusively via Disney’s streaming platform.







    Longtime fans of Pixar may remember the Soul co-writer/director Pete Docter‘s past films with the studio including Monsters Inc., Up, and Inside Out–their cream of the crop. If 2015’s Inside Out was Docter’s exploration of human emotion, Soul is his examination of human spirituality. Where does inspiration originate? What’s the special energy that gets individuals motivated and excited to take on each and every day? How do purpose and fulfillment work together in the human psyche to create happiness and a sense of belonging? These are just a few of the questions this film considers through its highly creative and hugely ambitious story.







    Don’t let the deep and larger than life ideas and themes concern you, Soul is a highly entertaining film for the whole family. In true Pixar tradition, it’s got a star-studded cast, largely African American, including Jamie Foxx, Questlove, Angela Bassett, Tina Fey, Daveed Diggs, Graham Norton and many others.







    According to IMDB, Soul is described as:







    A musician who has lost his passion for music is transported out of his body and must find his way back with the help of an infant soul learning about themself.



















    Episode Time Stamps







    0:15 – Introductions







    2:09 – Spoiler-Free Review







    21:23 – Spoiler Discussion







    Follow The Cinematic Schematic Podcast







    Hear all of this and more of our past and future episodes by subscribing to The Cinematic Schematic on your preferred podcast app and leaving us a rating on Apple Podcasts!







    Like The Cinematropolis on Facebook







    Follow The Cinematropolis on Twitter @thecinematrop

    • 51 min
    Tenet – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Tenet – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    The Cinematic Schematic podcast is back this week to review one of 2020’s most highly anticipated films, Tenet, AKA “the film that will save cinema.” We’re rejoined by guest co-hosts Jacob and Zachary Burns, co-founders of Planet Thunder Productions and The Cinematropolis, to give our initial spoiler-free reviews before diving into the film’s details to determine whether or not it was worth the wait. Tune in!







    The new film from The Dark Knight and Inception writer/director Christopher Nolan has had quite the journey to release. Like most films in 2020, Tenet saw several delays. It was originally scheduled for July 17, 2020, before initially being pushed to July 31, 2020, before finally being released on August 26 internationally and then September 3, 2020, in the US. At one point, they were releasing trailers without actual release dates, just saying “coming soon to theaters,” while drawing criticism in the headlines for its unconventional marketing strategy and intention to release during the global pandemic.







    The film went on to be a modest success internationally given the circumstances(the film was never released in several major US cities), with a total gross of $362.2 million as of December 19, 2020. After all of the fuss Tenet received in the news leading up to its release, how well does it hold up now that it has arrived VOD and on home video as opposed to Nolan’s preferred venue, the IMAX big screen?







    According to IMDB, Tenet can be described as:







    Armed with only one word, Tenet, and fighting for the survival of the entire world, a Protagonist(John David Washington) journeys through a twilight world of international espionage on a mission that will unfold in something beyond real-time.







    Time Stamps







    0:15 – Introductions







    4:48 – Spoiler-Free Review







    44:36 – Spoiler Discussion







    Follow The Cinematic Schematic Podcast







    Hear all of this and more of our past and future episodes by subscribing to The Cinematic Schematic on your preferred podcast app and leaving us a rating on Apple Podcasts!







    Like The Cinematropolis on Facebook







    Follow The Cinematropolis on Twitter @thecinematrop

    • 1 hr 27 min
    Mank – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Mank – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Welcome to The Cinematic Schematic, the official podcast of The Cinematropolis.com.







    Today, we’re introducing a new, shorter-form film review format. As detailed in our recent podcast announcement, this post is one of many changes being made to the podcast in order to give you, the listener, episodes more frequently.







    According to IMDB “1930’s Hollywood is reevaluated through the eyes of scathing social critic and alcoholic screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz as he races to finish the screenplay of Citizen Kane (1941).”







    Mank is directed by David Fincher and stars Gary Oldman, Amanda Seyfried, Lily Collins Tom Burke and Charles Dance.







    Fincher’s latest is a welcome departure in his oeuvre that I quite enjoyed. The set and sound designs are stunning, the performances are outstanding and the screenplay(penned by Fincher’s late father, Jack) carries the type of Hollywood nostalgia the Academy will go bananas over come awards season in spring 2021.







    There are three things in particular I want to note about Mank: 







    #1. I should clarify when I say “departure…” 







    Yes, like most of Fincher’s films, the main character (Mankiewicz in this case) is trapped in a machine, arguably of his own making, and he can’t seem to escape…a theme made pretty explicit within the text. Whether you’re watching Nick and Amy Dunne in Gone Girl, forever trapped in the prison or their marriage, Robert Graysmith, a prisoner of a professional obsession in Zodiac or Ellen Ripley in Alien 3, who is stuck in a literal space prison, this is an idea we’ve seen explored in nearly all of Fincher’s films. 







    That said, I can’t think of a more triumphant one of his movies. Without getting into the spoiler details of ACTUAL history, the film concludes in a relatively uplifting manner. Mank is hardly Fincher’s best or most impactful film, but the change of pace is welcome. 







    #2. There’s a lack of clear focus







    In many ways, this film feels like a series of related but disconnected scenes strung together. Is Mank about the making of Citizen Kane? Or perhaps a reflection on how legacy film studios like MGM push out artists who buck the company line? Is it an exploration of how Herman J. Mankiewicz escapes the proverbial organ grinder described by William Randolph Hearst through self-actualization? The answer is both all of the above and therefore, none of the above. 







    #3. The production values are through the roof







    In true Fincher fashion, there is a painstaking amount of attention to detail in the sets, sound design and performances. In an interview with Total Film magazine, Charles Dance reported the climatic scene of the film required over a 100 takes before the production moved on. Whether or not this is necessary is up for debate, but there’s not a doubt in my mind the director was striving for perfection. While I can’t call the screenplay a masterpiece due to the lack of focus previous referenced, this film is nothing if not detail-oriented. The sound is somehow both pristine and also sounds how you remember Citizen Kane. Despite being in black and white,

    • 12 min
    An Important Announcement about The Cinematic Schematic

    An Important Announcement about The Cinematic Schematic

    After being away on a several month-long hiatus in 2020, I have a special announcement to make. The Cinematic Schematic podcast is back!







    If you’ve been a longtime listener or The Cinematropolis reader, you’ve probably noticed things have been quiet here the last several months. There are a few reasons for this silence:







    * The challenges presented to the film industry in 2020 due to the pandemic. * A shift in the priorities in my personal/professional life with various projects.* Content creation burnout.







    To remedy this, here’s what you can expect closing out this year and moving into 2021:







    * Short weekly solo movie reviews, featuring my quick take on a new release.* Approximately one group roundtable film conversation a month.* Other special podcast series.







    This will start immediately—podcast subscribers will notice my review of David Fincher’s Mank was released at the same time as this episode. 







    Next week, you can expect a review of Christopher Nolan’s Tenet and Pixar’s new movie, Soul. And the following week, we’ll be covering Wonder Woman 1984.







    2020 has undeniably been an unusual and challenging year for everyone, including professionals working in the film and service industries. No matter what 2021 means for movie theaters, the show must go on and so must the thoughtful conversations on The Cinematic Schematic!

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

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The NPR of movies

This show has an excellent take on film analysis. Dividing its time into focused segments from different hosts keeps the podcast moving and never lulls into rants and ramblings. Always thoughtful film analysis, plus interviews, AND a great segment each episode that focuses specifically on film scores. A film podcast with a new and original and fresh take on the format.

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Check them out!

If you enjoy films and talking about them this is the podcast for you!

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Always Considered, Never Sensationalized

If you are looking for thorough analysis and a great rotating guest host lineup, this is the podcats for you. Anchored by Caleb, you get thoughtful analysis and diverse viewpoints from this great podcast

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