121 episodes

The Cinematic Schematic is a multi-segment podcast dedicated to thoughtful, analysis-driven conversations on genre, independent and classic films from thecinematropolis.com. Hosted by Caleb Masters and a rotating cast of filmmakers, critics, and special guests, this podcast takes you through some of the most prominent themes and conversations occurring in cinema each month.

The Cinematic Schematic The Cinematropolis

    • TV & Film
    • 4.7 • 15 Ratings

The Cinematic Schematic is a multi-segment podcast dedicated to thoughtful, analysis-driven conversations on genre, independent and classic films from thecinematropolis.com. Hosted by Caleb Masters and a rotating cast of filmmakers, critics, and special guests, this podcast takes you through some of the most prominent themes and conversations occurring in cinema each month.

    How Prey Sets a New Standard for Indigenous Representation With Producer Jhane Myers and Sunrise Tippeconnie – The Cinematic Schematic

    How Prey Sets a New Standard for Indigenous Representation With Producer Jhane Myers and Sunrise Tippeconnie – The Cinematic Schematic

    It’s been thirty-five years since Arnold lathered himself in mud and shouted the now iconic internet meme, “Get to the chopper,” in Predator, and against all odds, the franchise has found new life in the latest entry streaming on Hulu, Prey. In today’s special The Cinematic Schematic podcast interview, we are spotlighting some of the incredible behind-the-scenes talents that helped bring Prey to life!







    Coming right off the heels of the critically and financially underwhelming The Predator(2018), director Dan Trachtenberg(10 Cloverfield Lane, The Boys) and Patrick Aison’s new take on the iconic hunter was greenlit and this time, things looked a little bit different. Audiences would be sent back in time 300 years, and instead of following a bodybuilder or wisecracking action movie hero with guns, this story would star a Comanche nation woman named Naru who uses her wit and determination to face down the 20th Century Studios alien icon.







    Before we go any further, we know what you’re thinking…are these really the best people to tell a Comanche story? Following the initial pitch, in steps Jhane Myers, a Comanche and Blackfeet American Indian who is known for her attention to detail and dedication to producing, Native language, and Native cultural advising among many other talents. To help ensure the Comanche nation was well represented, Myers also recruited the help of consultants and advisors like Sunrise Tippeconnie to ensure every detail was both accurately portrayed, and also true to the thrills, kills, and adrenaline rush the Predator franchise has been known for.







    Myers and Tippeconnie join us to talk about how they helped shape the premise and setting of Prey before discussing the importance of indigenous representation in the film along with how they approached being the first feature film dubbed in the Comanche language.







    Tune into the full interview to hear more details regarding how putting a woman in the lead in Prey subverts the series tropes and what the record Hulu viewership and critical success could mean for the future of the franchise.















    Special Guests















    Jhane Myers







    Producer, Prey







    Follow Jhane on Instagram @thejhane























    Sunrise Tippeconnie







    Consultant on Prey















    About Prey







    According to the IMDB, Prey is described as:







    The origin story of the Predator in the world of the Comanche Nation 300 years ago. Naru, a skilled warrior, fights to protect her tribe against one of the first highly-evolved Predators to land on Earth.



























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    • 37 min
    Nope – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Nope – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    In today’s episode of The Cinematic Schematic, we’re saddling up to wrangle an unidentified flying piece of discourse consuming every inch of the internet in our review of Jordan Peele’s latest movie, Nope.







    Laron Chapman and Daniel Bokemper rejoin host Caleb Masters on the show to answer the ice-breaker question, “What is your favorite film or TV sequence featuring a UFO,” before providing their spoiler-free thoughts and a verdict. The majority of the conversation is spent in spoilers covering several of the film’s themes including the risks and dangers of pursuing spectacle, how black entertainers have been treated throughout Hollywood history, and what makes Peele’s take on UFOs innovative and more than meets the eye.







    Can Peele make lightning strike a third time or has he started to follow in the missteps of M. Night Shyamalan?







    Tune into our full Nope review discussion for the full verdict!















    Special Guests















    Laron Chapman







    Award-winning Oklahoma filmmaker







    Follow Laron on Instagram @blackmoviemagic























    Daniel Bokemper







    Contributor at The Cinematropolis







    Follow Daniel on Twitter @Daniel_Bokemper















    About Nope







    According to IMDB, Nope can be described as:







    The residents of a lonely gulch in inland California bear witness to an uncanny and chilling discovery.



























    If you’re interested in Nope:







    Laron Chapman Recommends:







    Movie – Jaws(1975) – Available to buy or rent VOD























    Daniel Bokemper Recommends:







    Movie – Tremors (1990) – Now streaming on Peacock























    Movie – Blackfish – Now streaming on Amazon Prime Video























    Movie – The Thing (1982) – Now Streaming on Amazon Prime Video























    Caleb Masters Recommends:







    Movie – Tropic Thunder (2008) – Available to buy or rent VOD

    • 1 hr 20 min
    Thor: Love and Thunder – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Thor: Love and Thunder – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    The Cinematic Schematic returns this week on a mission to kill god…the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s most beloved god, Thor Odinson, in our review of Thor: Love and Thunder.







    First-time guest Chad Parizman, a podcast host/producer and principal/founder of Ader communications, joins us for the review journey. Also returning to the show are Nathan Poppe of Oklahoma’s Curbside Chronicle fame, and longtime co-host and award-winning filmmaker Laron Chapman. We kick things off with our ice-breaker question, “Between The Batman using Nirvana, and now Thor: Love and Thunder using Guns and Roses, what superhero+pop music match-up would you like to see,” before giving our spoiler-free reviews. We close out the thunderous conversation with a spoiler-filled discussion about how the film examines the nature of gods in our culture and the state of Marvel in phase IV.







    Thor: Love and Thunder is the twenty-ninth film in the MCU, and features the only character to have a standalone fourth chapter to their story. Additionally, following his Oscar win for Jojo Rabbit‘s screenplay, and the widely loved soft franchise reboot, Thor: Ragnorok, writer/director Taika Waititi returns to Thor, this time with an outstanding supporting cast including Christian Bale(Gorr the God Butcher), Natalie Portman (the Mighty Thor), Russell Crowe (Zeus), and the entire Guardians of the Galaxy among many others. Lastly, the film has drawn lots of attention to its use of the VFX technology developed for The Mandalorian, “the Volume.” The ingredients for greatness all appear to be there, and yet, Love and Thunder has also proven divisive among fans and critics, coming in at a near-series low Rotten Tomatoes score of 67%.







    Does Thor: Love and Thunder keep up the franchise momentum for our favorite Norse god, or is it time to send this series straight to Valhalla?







    Listen to our full review to get the verdict!















    Guests















    Nathan Poppe







    Curbside Chronicle editor and concert photographer







    “Oklahoma’s Favorite Son”







    Follow Nathan on Twitter and Instagram @NathanPoppe























    Chad Parizman







    Podcast host/producer, principal, and founder at Ader Communications







    Disney Fan







    Follow Chad on Twitter @CParizman























    Laron Chapman







    Award-winning Oklahoma filmmaker







    Follow Laron on Instagram @blackmoviemagic















    About Thor: Love and Thunder







    According to IMDB,

    • 1 hr 46 min
    Lightyear – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Lightyear – The Cinematic Schematic Review

    Attention listeners, it appears we have landed on a strange movie in a bonus review of Lightyear, the movie that’s said to have inspired Andy’s love for the character of Buzz Lightyear in Toy Story (1995). Is it a forgettable knock-off complete with a newly cast Buzz (Chris Evans), or have we entered into the next great spin-off phase for the beloved Pixar franchise?







    In this special edition of The Cinematic Schematic, we review Lightyear with Lauren Weingart from Video Peach Productions. We start things off with our routine ice breaker question, “If you could watch a movie one of your favorite toys was based on, which would you pick? Why, and what genre would it be?” We then jump into our spoiler-free review followed by an analysis-driven discussion around the film’s spoilers.







    Does Lightyear take the Toy Story franchise to infinity and beyond, or is this just a confused attempt at a cash grab? Tune in to hear our full review!















    Special Guest















    Lauren Weingart







    Founder of Video Peach Productions







    Follow her on Instagram @videopeachproductions















    According to IMDB, Lightyear can be described as:







    While spending years attempting to return home, marooned Space Ranger Buzz Lightyear encounters an army of ruthless robots commanded by Zurg who are attempting to steal his fuel source.



























    If you’re interested in Lightyear…







    Lauren Weingart Recommends:







    Movie – Toy Story 2 (1999) – Now streaming on Disney+























    Movie – Interstellar(2014) – Now streaming on Paramount+























    Caleb Masters Recommends:







    Video Game – The Mass Effect Trilogy Remastered (PS4/PS5/Xbox One/Xbox Series X, PC)























    Movie – Contact (1997)– Now streaming on Hoopla























    Follow The Cinematic Schematic Podcast







    Hear all of this and more of our past and future episodes by subscribing to The Cinematic Schematic on your preferred podcast app and leaving us a rating on Apple Podcasts!







    Follow The Cinematic Schematic on Spotify







    Like The Cinematropolis on Facebook

    • 1 hr 7 min
    The Black Phone Review

    The Black Phone Review

    When news broke director Scott Derrickson was leaving Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness in 2020 due to creative differences, the moviegoing internet and fans of the film’s predecessor were understandably concerned. Why would such a talented director who fought so hard for the first film leave a project he was supposedly passionate about?







    The answer, at least partially, is the director’s latest project reteaming him with his Sinister writer, C. Robert Cargill, The Black Phone. Does this movie pivoting the director back to horror live up to the bold shift in career direction?







    In this episode of The Cinematic Schematic, we’re joined by first-time guest, Matt Donato, returning co-host, Laron Chapman, and Caleb Masters to answer that question.







    Based on the Joe Hill short story of the same name and set in 1978, The Black Phone follows Finney (Mason Thames), who becomes the latest in a string of kidnapped children by a part-time magician only known as “The Grabber” (Ethan Hawke). After waking up in a stripped-down basement, Finney is haunted by the ghosts of the kidnapped children who occupied the space before him. Meanwhile, his sister Gwen(Madeleine McGraw) uses every available resource to find her brother before it’s too late.







    We start with this week’s podcast discussion with the ice breaker question, “If you had no choice but to be trapped in a horror movie, what decade of horror movie would you prefer to be stuck in and why?” before jumping headfirst into our spoiler-free reviews of the films. We close out the conversation by crossing through the veil of spoilers to discuss the film’s use of ghosts, psychics, and the Derrickson/Cargill duo.







    Is this the return to horror Derrickson fans have been waiting for, or do we end up wishing he’d stuck to the Strange sequel? Tune in to hear our full review and spoiler-filled analysis.







    Special Guests















    Matt Donato







    RT-approved Los Angeles-based film critic published on IGN, SlashFilm, Nerdist, Fangoria, Polygon, Bloody Disgusting, Collider, Atom Insider, Flickering Myth, Dread Central, and Fandom







    Co-Founder of Certified Forgotten

    • 1 hr 19 min
    Jurassic World: Dominion Review - The Cinematic Schematic

    Jurassic World: Dominion Review - The Cinematic Schematic

    …Your Scientists Were So Preoccupied With Whether Or Not They Could, They Didn’t Stop To Think If They Should.Ian Malcom, Jurassic Park















    When looking back on the experience of watching Jurassic World: Dominion the words of the famous Ian Malcom quote echos strongly throughout the sixth (and allegedly final) entry in the dino-megablockbuster Jurassic Park franchise. Despite already being a massive hit at the box office (it’s grossed over $600 million worldwide as of this writing), the big question we’re left with is “was this second trilogy really necessary?”







    To answer that question, The Cinematic Schematic joins the conversation that has been 65 million (and nearly 30) years in the making in our review of Jurassic World: Dominion.







    Similarly to this movie, today’s conversation is a reunion of the beloved cast of hosts from last year’s (allegedly acclaimed) F9: The Fast Saga review, KJYO-FM’s Jason Black, award-winning filmmaker, Laron Chapman, and recurring guest host, Brock Lay. The conversation kicks off with our ice breaker question, “what team of five would you take to Jurassic Park,” before we provided our spoiler-free thoughts on the film. We close out the conversation by diving into a few spoiler-related topics including whether or not writer/director Colin Trevorrow has been able to do the franchise justice.







    Is this an exciting epic conclusion to the beloved T-rex starring franchise? Tune in to hear our thoughts on all of it and more in our full review!















    Special Guests















    Jason Black







    KJYO-FM, The Oklahoma Film Critics Circle and The Critics Choice Association







    Follow Jason Black on Instagram @flickkicks23























    Laron Chapman







    Award-winning Oklahoma filmmaker







    Follow Laron on Instagram @blackmoviemagic























    Brock Lay







    The “Brockness Monster” of graphic designers







    Follow Brock on Instagram @brockness_monster















    According to IMDB, Jurassic World: Dominion is described as:







    Four years after the destruction of Isla Nublar, dinosaurs now live–and hunt–alongside humans all over the world. This fragile balance will reshape the future and determine, once and for all, whether human beings are to remain the apex predators on a planet they now share with history’s most fearsome creatures in a new Era.



























    Follow The Cinematic Schematic Podcast







    Hear all of this and more of our past and future episodes by subscribing to The Cinematic Schematic on your preferred podcast app and leaving us a rating on Apple Podcasts...

    • 1 hr 35 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

Lefteyeburns ,

The NPR of movies

This show has an excellent take on film analysis. Dividing its time into focused segments from different hosts keeps the podcast moving and never lulls into rants and ramblings. Always thoughtful film analysis, plus interviews, AND a great segment each episode that focuses specifically on film scores. A film podcast with a new and original and fresh take on the format.

FireLordDodo ,

Check them out!

If you enjoy films and talking about them this is the podcast for you!

aclucari ,

Always Considered, Never Sensationalized

If you are looking for thorough analysis and a great rotating guest host lineup, this is the podcats for you. Anchored by Caleb, you get thoughtful analysis and diverse viewpoints from this great podcast

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