310 episodes

One question posed to a high-profile newsmaker, followed up with lively debate. Anne McElvoy hosts The Economist's chat show. Published every Friday on Economist Radio.

The Economist Asks The Economist

    • News
    • 4.4 • 286 Ratings

One question posed to a high-profile newsmaker, followed up with lively debate. Anne McElvoy hosts The Economist's chat show. Published every Friday on Economist Radio.

    The Economist Asks: Emily Mortimer

    The Economist Asks: Emily Mortimer

    How has the pursuit of love changed? Anne McElvoy asks the British actress, screenwriter and director of the TV adaptation of Nancy Mitford’s novel "The Pursuit of Love" about the choice women face between heady freedoms and a more settled life through the generations. Should period dramas be more diverse? And, which Russian classic would she adapt for the screen.
    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:
    www.economist.com/podcastoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: Amy Klobuchar

    The Economist Asks: Amy Klobuchar

    The Senator for Minnesota, former Democratic presidential candidate, and author of "Antitrust" talks to Anne McElvoy about whether America's mega-companies should be broken up. Also, will the Apple v Epic Games case increase competition and were Facebook’s Oversight Board right to uphold the suspension of Trump’s account. And are female politicians more likely to be accused of bossiness than men?


    Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Economist Asks: Tammy Duckworth

    The Economist Asks: Tammy Duckworth

    In 2004 Tammy Duckworth was shot down by Iraqi insurgents while she was serving in the army and lost both legs in the attack. As America withdraws troops from Afghanistan, Anne McElvoy asks the Illinois senator about the legacy of America's interventions abroad and whether President Biden is making the right decision. The first Thai-American woman in Congress says there is "enough pie for everyone" and minority groups in Congress should work together. Also, what scares her?  


    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:
    www.economist.com/podcastoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 27 min
    The Economist Asks: Henry Kissinger

    The Economist Asks: Henry Kissinger

    How does the best-known veteran of foreign policy view the great global standoff today? Henry Kissinger is a titan of US politics — as Secretary of State and National Security Advisor in the Nixon and Ford administrations he brokered detente with the Soviet Union and orchestrated a breakthrough presidential visit to China in 1972. Incumbents have sought his insight long after he left the White House. Anne McElvoy asks him about the current threats to world order, how to handle Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, and what he would have done differently when in office. And, following an Economist advert, are plane companions ever too inhibited to talk to him? 


    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:
    www.economist.com/podcastoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 42 min
    The Economist Asks: Francis Suarez

    The Economist Asks: Francis Suarez

    How do you reinvent a city? The mayor of Miami is on a mission to turn his city into the world’s foremost tech and financial hub. Anne McElvoy explores whether he can tempt entrepreneurs and investors away from Silicon Valley and Wall Street and how he will improve the lives of Miamians. Mayor Suarez talks about his ambitions in the Republican Party and reveals why he did not vote for Donald Trump.


    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:
    www.economist.com/podcastoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 24 min
    The Economist Asks: Paul Theroux

    The Economist Asks: Paul Theroux

    What can a travel writer learn from staying at home? Anne McElvoy asks the prolific travel author Paul Theroux about the virtues of being homebound during the pandemic. The author of "Under the Wave at Waimea" reveals that his friend and one-time foe V.S. Naipaul inspired a character in his new book about big-wave surfing in Hawaii. Also, verbal fencing with his sons Louis and Marcel and his ultimate travel destination. 


    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:
    www.economist.com/podcastoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
286 Ratings

286 Ratings

WaitsTooLongToReview ,

Offers some great interviews you can’t get anywhere else, but can be hit or miss

Guests are usually great. I much prefer the business/political guests (Gates/Hastings/Cameron/Hong Kong futures) that are active in the “real world” more than the arts/literature guests that report on what others are doing, but the different perspectives are nice I suppose.

I alternate between cheering Anne for asking great questions and rolling my eyes and shaking my head at her. Her bias shows through very often, which I can deal with, but when The Economist brings in guests that are really polarized it is frustrating to listen to (Reines). I wish it was overall more balanced to the center.

NEntropy ,

Credibility lost with random comments

Loved what he said about being neutral and respectful Reaganism. However, he doesn’t know what he is talking about re. China. He should go there and see it before making random comments. For a politician, the last thing to do is to speak on something one doesn’t know. What a shame ... Credibility instantly lost.

DontMakeMeFillInThisField ,

Panders to authoritarians. Bashes everyone else.

Awful show.

The host seems incapable of asking serious and meaningful questions to any conservative (US) or authoritarian (Chinese) guest. The less the guest aligns with acceptable norms of free speech, human rights, and open democracy, the more the host gives that guest an open and unchallenged mic to spew all manner of lies and dishonesty.

Meanwhile, the host gleefully harasses middle-of-the-spectrum and “liberal” guests with a plethora of fact-free, half-baked “it seems to me’ assertions.

The Economist wold immediately double the quality of their podcasts by dropping this show (or at least its host).

Top Podcasts In News

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by The Economist