3 episodes

The Filter, hosted by Ieshia Downton and Vicky Diaz-Camacho, mics up under-reported stories in Kansas City. The podcast will give context to issues centered on culture in Kansas City that we may not have considered before.

The Filter Flatland KC

    • Society & Culture

The Filter, hosted by Ieshia Downton and Vicky Diaz-Camacho, mics up under-reported stories in Kansas City. The podcast will give context to issues centered on culture in Kansas City that we may not have considered before.

    The Filter Ep. 2: ‘Alone Together’

    The Filter Ep. 2: ‘Alone Together’

    In early March, the coronavirus pandemic didn’t seem like it would hit the U.S. this hard. And then it did. 



    The number of COVID-19 cases continue to spike, so leaders across the country are mandating that people stay at home under the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Folks are advised to self-isolate or practice social distancing, which is a public health effort to stop the spread from sick to healthy people, according to Johns Hopkins University.



    Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly ordered that residents in six Kansas counties – Wyandotte, Douglas, Doniphan, Miami, Leavenworth and Johnson – can only go out for essentials. Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas has issued the same “Stay At Home” order. Other counties in the metropolitan area have joined.



    But this virus also revealed other symptoms. Racism. Othering. Political confusion. 



    “I think that casting the Coronavirus as the ‘Chinese Virus’ is soaking up xenophobia. … It has real world consequences.”jack zhang, political science professor at KU



    So in this episode, we tapped Jack Zhang, an expert in U.S.-China relations who not only has the academic experience to share, but also a few personal takes. Then we had a candid conversation with 90.9 The Bridge’s Michelle Bacon, who delves into how this pandemic has affected her. 



    We cover topics like anxiety, feeling othered, and how socializing has changed (and changed us) in the past few weeks. So hang and learn with us. 



    If you have a question about this topic, let your voice be heard. Our public-powered effort called curiousKC is open for your questions. Read more about how you can get involved and submit here.







    Want more of The Filter? Listen to all of our episodes by clicking here and share by using #TheFilterKC.

    The Filter Ep. 1: ‘Don’t Touch My Hair’

    The Filter Ep. 1: ‘Don’t Touch My Hair’

    In 2019, the CROWN – Create a Respectful and Open Workplace for Natural Hair – Act was introduced by California representative Holly Mitchell. Since the law was first introduced, it has been signed into law in California, New York and New Jersey. 



    Closer to home, Kansas state Rep. Oletha Faust-Goudeau (D-Wichita) introduced the same bill for the state of Kansas. The local CROWN Act, SB 250, would “amend the definition of ‘race’ in the Kansas act against discrimination to include traits historically associated with race, including hair texture and protective hairstyles.” 



    “Maybe my work is being inhibited because of my hair. When I walk into the room, they’re not listening to the words that I say. They’re looking at my hair.”EMILY BROWN



    In this episode of “The Filter,” you will hear personal stories, learn what impact a law like this would have on the Kansas City area’s black community and how embedded race-based discrimination is when it comes to natural hair. Thanks to Emily Brown, founder of a local nonprofit and member of Shirley’s Kitchen Cabinet, and LaRon Green, a hairstylist and the manager of Shampoo by Salon LaRon in the Brookside/Waldo area, who shared their perspectives.

    Introducing a new podcast from Flatland: ‘The Filter’

    Introducing a new podcast from Flatland: ‘The Filter’

    “The Filter,” Flatland’s newest podcast, mics up under-reported stories in Kansas City. The podcast will give context to issues centered on culture in Kansas City that we may not have considered before.



    Hosts Ieshia Downton and Vicky Diaz-Camacho are interested in the nuance of Kansas City culture and will delve into topics that we may want to talk about but sometimes feel like we can’t. Through in-studio interviews and immersive audio storytelling, “The Filter” will tap into all aspects of KC culture to bring voices that are often missing from the conversation.



    Beginning Feb. 26, the first episode of “The Filter” will tackle what the CROWN Act means to Kansas City’s black community, explore how the “American Dirt” controversy affects local bookstores and immigrant authors, explain how it really feels being multi-racial in the heartland, and more.



    A teaser is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and wherever podcasts are available. Some of “The Filter’s” segments also will air on 90.9 The Bridge.



    Production was made possible by Chris Cosgrove, audio engineer at Kansas City PBS. The podcast’s theme music is “Devoted” by St. Louis artist Aysia BerLynn.

Customer Reviews

Brieanna Lightfoot Smith ,

Really great conversations!

Tuning into this podcast feels like sitting down to have coffee or tea with a friend. And the music in the background gives such a cool vibe. Glad to be in on yalls conversations!

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture