31 min

the importance of noticing when to listen for difference, not for the familiar Deep Listening - Impact beyond words - Oscar Trimboli

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Aubrey Blanche:
Always ask how it could be more equitable.
This is really core to the practice in what I teach. My theory of change is called equitable design, and it's really based in these beliefs that every decision, every action, or for every event, experience, program, system, product can either create greater or less equity. And I believe that the most powerful thing each of us can do is do the next slightly more right thing.

 
Oscar Trimboli:
Deep listening, impact beyond words.
Good day. I'm Oscar Trimboli and this is the Apple award-winning podcast, Deep Listening, designed to move you from a distracted listener to a deep and impactful leader. Did you know you spend 55% of your day listening, yet only 2% of people have ever been taught how? In each episode we explore the five levels of listening. Communication is 50% speaking and 50% listening. Yet, as a leader, you are taught only the importance of communication from the perspective of how to speak. It's critical you start to build some muscles for the next phase in how to listen. The cost of not listening, it's confusion, it's conflict, it's projects running over schedule. It's lost customers, it's great employees that leave before they want to. When you implement the strategies, the tips and tactics that you'll hear, you'll get four hours a week back in your schedule. I wonder what you could do with an extra four hours or a week.
Aubrey Blanche is a math nerd and an empath who helps organizations build equitable processes, products and experiences. Her work combines an empathetic and intersectional approach with social scientific methods to create meaningful and sustainable change
From fair talent processes and bias resistant product design to equitable algorithmic design and communication strategy. She helps organizations to think holistically about evolving to meet the needs of a rapidly diversifying and globalizing world.
Aubrey and I explore listening for differences, practical steps you can implement in your organization to listen for the data of performance and equity while being conscious of change over time.
That's the performance implication of listening for velocity.
Aubrey changed my mind about my choice of where to spend my time in our deep listening quest and the consequences of choosing who and where I place my attention.
Let's listen to Aubrey.
What's the cost of not listening?

 
Aubrey Blanche:
In the worst case scenarios, it's that you do actual harm to another person.
In the work that I do, I'm so often talking to people, working with people, trying to support people who are very different from me.
If I'm not able to listen deeply, there is a big chance that I contribute to them still not feeling heard. I work with marginalized people who are often unheard in the world, and so I can do harm by exacerbating that. Or if I'm not listening deeply, I can develop a solution that doesn't actually meet the need that's being articulated and could actually be harmful in some way.
Listening is the first thing that we do when we want to support other people, when you scale it out, really, it's how we build a better world when we listen and we build a worse world when we don't.

 
Oscar Trimboli:
Jennifer, a retired primary school teacher is a stay at home mom and her son, Christopher at the age of three, comes home from school. Jennifer says to Christopher, "What did you learn at school today, honey?" He said, "Mommy, mommy, I'm so excited. I learned the three is half of eight." Now Jennifer's a little confused. And as a former primary school teacher says, "Could you say that again, honey?" And he said, "Yeah, mommy, I learned that three is half of eight."
Well, Jennifer puts her hands in her face and kind of shakes her head and she goes to the cupboard and she gets eight M&Ms out of the cupboard and lines them up on the kitchen table.
She puts four M&M soldiers in one line and four M&M soldiers in another.
She picks C

Aubrey Blanche:
Always ask how it could be more equitable.
This is really core to the practice in what I teach. My theory of change is called equitable design, and it's really based in these beliefs that every decision, every action, or for every event, experience, program, system, product can either create greater or less equity. And I believe that the most powerful thing each of us can do is do the next slightly more right thing.

 
Oscar Trimboli:
Deep listening, impact beyond words.
Good day. I'm Oscar Trimboli and this is the Apple award-winning podcast, Deep Listening, designed to move you from a distracted listener to a deep and impactful leader. Did you know you spend 55% of your day listening, yet only 2% of people have ever been taught how? In each episode we explore the five levels of listening. Communication is 50% speaking and 50% listening. Yet, as a leader, you are taught only the importance of communication from the perspective of how to speak. It's critical you start to build some muscles for the next phase in how to listen. The cost of not listening, it's confusion, it's conflict, it's projects running over schedule. It's lost customers, it's great employees that leave before they want to. When you implement the strategies, the tips and tactics that you'll hear, you'll get four hours a week back in your schedule. I wonder what you could do with an extra four hours or a week.
Aubrey Blanche is a math nerd and an empath who helps organizations build equitable processes, products and experiences. Her work combines an empathetic and intersectional approach with social scientific methods to create meaningful and sustainable change
From fair talent processes and bias resistant product design to equitable algorithmic design and communication strategy. She helps organizations to think holistically about evolving to meet the needs of a rapidly diversifying and globalizing world.
Aubrey and I explore listening for differences, practical steps you can implement in your organization to listen for the data of performance and equity while being conscious of change over time.
That's the performance implication of listening for velocity.
Aubrey changed my mind about my choice of where to spend my time in our deep listening quest and the consequences of choosing who and where I place my attention.
Let's listen to Aubrey.
What's the cost of not listening?

 
Aubrey Blanche:
In the worst case scenarios, it's that you do actual harm to another person.
In the work that I do, I'm so often talking to people, working with people, trying to support people who are very different from me.
If I'm not able to listen deeply, there is a big chance that I contribute to them still not feeling heard. I work with marginalized people who are often unheard in the world, and so I can do harm by exacerbating that. Or if I'm not listening deeply, I can develop a solution that doesn't actually meet the need that's being articulated and could actually be harmful in some way.
Listening is the first thing that we do when we want to support other people, when you scale it out, really, it's how we build a better world when we listen and we build a worse world when we don't.

 
Oscar Trimboli:
Jennifer, a retired primary school teacher is a stay at home mom and her son, Christopher at the age of three, comes home from school. Jennifer says to Christopher, "What did you learn at school today, honey?" He said, "Mommy, mommy, I'm so excited. I learned the three is half of eight." Now Jennifer's a little confused. And as a former primary school teacher says, "Could you say that again, honey?" And he said, "Yeah, mommy, I learned that three is half of eight."
Well, Jennifer puts her hands in her face and kind of shakes her head and she goes to the cupboard and she gets eight M&Ms out of the cupboard and lines them up on the kitchen table.
She puts four M&M soldiers in one line and four M&M soldiers in another.
She picks C

31 min