27 episodes

What is journalism? How can we make it better? What does "better" look like? We talk about some of these questions -- and answer them -- in our discussions with academics and professionals who've published recently in Journalism Practice. We focus on meanings of advancing digital technologies in journalism, social issues and conditions that journalists (need to) cover, and the future of the field. Articles featured in the episodes are temporarily made free access for citizens, journalists, scholars, and students. While the discussions are rooted in research, they are approached to influence practice. The podcast is hosted and produced by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr., a former journalist, Associate Editor at Journalism Practice, and an Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) in Critical Digital Media Practice at Lancaster University in the U.K. Follow him on Twitter @RobertGutscheJr and the podcast @JournPractice or email us with ideas and feedback at jwordpodcast@gmail.com.

The J Word: A Podcast by Journalism Practice Robert (Ted) Gutsche Jr.

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    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

What is journalism? How can we make it better? What does "better" look like? We talk about some of these questions -- and answer them -- in our discussions with academics and professionals who've published recently in Journalism Practice. We focus on meanings of advancing digital technologies in journalism, social issues and conditions that journalists (need to) cover, and the future of the field. Articles featured in the episodes are temporarily made free access for citizens, journalists, scholars, and students. While the discussions are rooted in research, they are approached to influence practice. The podcast is hosted and produced by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr., a former journalist, Associate Editor at Journalism Practice, and an Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) in Critical Digital Media Practice at Lancaster University in the U.K. Follow him on Twitter @RobertGutscheJr and the podcast @JournPractice or email us with ideas and feedback at jwordpodcast@gmail.com.

    The J Word 3.7: The Future of (Human) Journalism

    The J Word 3.7: The Future of (Human) Journalism

    Artificial intelligence, “robot journalism,” augmented and virtual realities. Journalism is always looking for the “next thing” in innovation to build audiences, trust, and sustainable futures. A lot of the innovation comes in the form of technology, but there are also adaptations that only humans can make. So, what’s the future for humans in journalism?
    Samuel Danzon-Chambaud is a researcher with Dublin City University’s Institute for Future Media and Journalism in Ireland and is co-author of “Changing or reinforcing the ‘rules of the game.’ He’s here to talk about a model he’s developing to understand journalists’ take on new technologies. 
    Oscar Westlund is a Professor in the Department of Journalism and Media Studies at Oslo Metropolitan University and is co-author of “Critical moments of coordination in newswork,” where he takes a look at the behind-the-scenes of newswork for Online Live Broadcasts to show the organizational needs and approaches of journalists working with new media.
    And, Isabel MacDonald is an independent journalist and researcher who is author of “Picturing Haitian earthquake survivors,” where she explores the technologies of paper and pencil in her graphic depictions of human suffering and resilience. 
      
    Text Featured in this Episode:
    Macdonald, I. (2021). Picturing Haitian Earthquake Survivors: Graphic Reportage as an Ethical Strategy for Representing Vulnerable Sources. Journalism Practice, 1-21.
    Westlund, O., & Ekström, M. (2021). Critical Moments of Coordination in Newswork. Journalism Practice, 1-19.
    Danzon-Chambaud, S., & Cornia, A. (2021). Changing or Reinforcing the “Rules of the Game”: A Field Theory Perspective on the Impacts of Automated Journalism on Media Practitioners. Journalism Practice, 1-15.


    Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.

    Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com

    • 46 min
    The J Word 3.6: Sourcing the Vulnerable

    The J Word 3.6: Sourcing the Vulnerable

    Journalism sometimes gets a bad rap for its role in marginalizing voices – especially because journalism is supposed to be about tackling power structures. Guests in this episode provide their takes on sourcing the vulnerable and try to flip the script by providing some ways journalism can protect the marginalized and ignored.
    Mi Rosie Jahng, Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University in the U.S. and the co-author of “Reconstructing the Informal and Invisible,” helps us see how journalists are responding to the most-recent attack on their authority through cries against “fake news,” cries that are increasing public concerns that journalism doesn’t stand for truth.

    From Spain, Mathias-Felipe de-Lima-Santos, a researcher at the University of Navarra and co-author of “Data journalism in favela,” takes a focused look at specific efforts journalists are taking to humanize data about forgotten and marginalized folk. And Milda Malling, a Ph.D. Candidate in the Journalism Department at Södertörn University in Sweden and author of “Reconstructing the informal and invisible,” reminds us that the way journalism marginalizes may be at the roots of how it works with sources, alerting us to the engrained nature of power in the press. 


    Text Featured in this Episode:
    de-Lima-Santos, M. F., & Mesquita, L. (2021). Data Journalism in favela: Made by, for, and about Forgotten and Marginalized Communities. Journalism Practice, 1-19.
    Malling, M. (2021). Reconstructing the Informal and Invisible: Interactions Between Journalists and Political Sources in Two Countries. Journalism Practice, 1-21.
    Jahng, M. R., Eckert, S., & Metzger-Riftkin, J. (2021). Defending the Profession: US Journalists’ Role Understanding in the Era of Fake News. Journalism Practice, 1-19.

    Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.

    Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com

    • 42 min
    The J Word 3.5: Speculating Social Media Futures

    The J Word 3.5: Speculating Social Media Futures

    Journalists use social media to predict – and to respond – to audiences’ interests and needs. But how is this kind of engagement reshaping news and its processes for the future? Can we use our predictive methods of social media use, such as metrics, to also speculate about how journalists can use social media of the future? 

    In this episode, Constanza Gajardo León, a Ph.D. candidate at Vrije Universiteit in The Netherlands and coauthor of “From abstract news users to living citizens,” talks with us about the best methods being used to understand – and guess – what audiences want and where they will go next for their news. And Zhao Peng, a lecturer at Boston’s Emerson College in the U.S. discusses her coauthored piece, “An examination of how social and technological perceptions predict social media news use on WeChat,” moves us into a futuristic take on what social media could be based on the innovations of today’s platforms.


    Text Featured in this Episode:
    Peng, Z., & Miller, S. (2021). An Examination of How Social and Technological Perceptions Predict Social Media News Use on WeChat. Journalism Practice, 1-20.
    Gajardo, C., Costera Meijer, I., & Domingo, D. (2021). From Abstract News Users to Living Citizens: Assessing Audience Engagement Through a Professional Lens. Journalism Practice, 1-17.


    Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.

    Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com

    • 39 min
    The J Word 3.4: Naming Missing News Voices

    The J Word 3.4: Naming Missing News Voices

    Our episodes often discuss marginalization and inequalities as a byproduct of journalism. Today, we try to find some solutions to those issues – naming the missing voices in financial crises, in transgender scenes, and in addressing voices of asylum seekers. 
    Danford Zirugo is a doctoral student at Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota in the U.S. His paper, “Negative memory mobilization” examines how journalists are reflecting back on their coverage of the 2008 economic disaster to understand what voices were missing in their coverage of financial crisis. 

    Minjie Li, Assistant Professor in Communication at the University of Tampa in the U.S., looks at what it means for journalists to be inclusive, particularly when it comes to transgender media visibility. He discusses this in his paper, “Exemplifying power Matters.” 

    And, recorded separately, Ashleigh Haw, a Research Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne in Australia takes us through her paper, “‘Hapless victims’ or ‘making trouble,’” which gives perspective on how news audiences recognize journalistic norms in covering asylum seekers.
     
    Text Featured in this Episode:
    Zirugo, D. (2021). Negative Memory Mobilization: Moments of Journalistic Failure as an Interpretive Lens. Journalism Practice, 1-16. 
    Li, M. (2021). Exemplifying Power Matters: The Impact of Power Exemplification of Transgender People in the News on Issue Attribution, Dehumanization, and Aggression Tendencies. Journalism Practice, 1-29.
    Haw, A. L. (2021). “Hapless Victims” or “Making Trouble”: Audience Responses to Stereotypical Representations of Asylum Seekers in Australian News Discourse. Journalism Practice, 1-19.
     
    Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.

    Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com

    • 59 min
    The J Word 3.3: Approaching Digital Audiences

    The J Word 3.3: Approaching Digital Audiences

    We talk a lot about audiences as a way to understand what’s "good" and "bad" journalism in the world. Journalists guess what audiences want. And they try to deliver. But when we dig deeper into the needs of audiences – and the needs of journalism, itself – what contestation and challenges and celebrations do we really find? Today, we discuss the challenges and celebrations of various types of journalism – and various types of audiences. The connection? There really is a lot more to know.
    Kristina Riegert from Södertörn University in Sweden, talks about her co-authored paper on cultural journalism, and we complicate what might be first considered an elitist form of journalism to see that it includes coverage of gaming, explanations of terror, and, yes, sometimes a review of the opera’s new tenor. 
    Karin Wahl-Jorgenson at Cardiff University in the U.K. unpacks her co-authored piece, “Conjecturing fearful futures” that looks at how journalists and their audiences are experiencing moral panic around deepfakes, where we ask just what audiences know (or think they know) about these new forms of media and how journalists are speculating about what deepfakes might mean for the future.
    And, speculating about how and why journalists ignore some audiences over others, particularly in financial news, Ángel Arrese at the University of Navarra in Spain talks about his coauthored piece, “The ignoring of ‘people’ in the journalistic coverage of economic crises.”


    Text Featured in this Episode:
    Arrese, Á., & Vara-Miguel, A. (2021). The Ignoring of “People” in the Journalistic Coverage of Economic Crises. The Housing Bubble and the Euro Crisis in Spain. Journalism Practice, 1-18.
    Wahl-Jorgensen, K., & Carlson, M. (2021). Conjecturing Fearful Futures: Journalistic Discourses on Deepfakes. Journalism Practice, 1-18.
    Kristensen, N. N., & Riegert, K. (2021). The Tensions of the Cultural News Beat. Journalism Practice, 1-15.


    Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.

    Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com

    • 54 min
    The J Word 3.2: Global Trends of Local News

    The J Word 3.2: Global Trends of Local News

    What are the forces on local news, and how do they operate in a global, digital world with its  influences and changes? This episode discusses the connections between ideologies and practices, interactions, and diversions in understanding normative and social understandings of journalistic complexities in local news. 

    Hélder Prior is Professor at Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul in Brazil and speaks to one of the most local of experiences, that of voting, in his co-authored article, “Framing political populism.” 

    Joy Jenkins, Assistant Professor at the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee and a Research Associate at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism as the University of Oxford, also looks at the role of the local in coverage through the lens of newsroom practices across Portugal, Germany, France, Finland, and the U.K. Her work “Changing the beat?” brings to scholarship the positionalities of newsroom managers and on how to create beats in local and regional digital news spaces.
     
    Text Featured in this Episode:
    Jenkins, J., & Jeronimo, P. (2021). Changing the Beat? Local Online Newsmaking in Finland, France, Germany, Portugal, and the UK. Journalism Practice, 1-18. 
    Araújo, B., & Prior, H. (2021). Framing political populism: the role of media in framing the election of Jair Bolsonaro. Journalism Practice, 15(2), 226-242.
     
    Produced and hosted by Robert (Ted) Gutsche, Jr.

    Give feedback to the podcast on Twitter @JournPractice or email jwordpodcast@gmail.com

    • 53 min

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