138 episodes

The Kingdom Perspective is the official podcast of Christ Redeemer Church of Hanover, NH. The podcast exists to disseminate the thought-provoking teaching of CRC to the wider public. If you like what you hear, please pass these on to your friends. Find out more about our church at our website: christredeemerchurch.org.

The Kingdom Perspectiv‪e‬ Christ Redeemer Church

    • Christianity
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

The Kingdom Perspective is the official podcast of Christ Redeemer Church of Hanover, NH. The podcast exists to disseminate the thought-provoking teaching of CRC to the wider public. If you like what you hear, please pass these on to your friends. Find out more about our church at our website: christredeemerchurch.org.

    The “Threatening” Good News

    The “Threatening” Good News

    Transcript:

    Hello, this is Pastor Don Willeman of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective.

    The message of Jesus’s Gospel was something very difficult for the ancient Roman Empire to process. The word “gospel” was not unfamiliar to the Romans. They would have spoken of the “good news” of the rise of a new emperor. For example, when Augustus, who had a few years earlier conquered all the rebellious factions within Rome, was established as emperor on January 16th, 27 B.C. monuments were soon erected proclaiming statements, such as, “Providence… by producing Augustus [has sent] us and our descendants a Savior, who has put an end to war….” Such language sounds quite religious to us, but it was actually quite natural for one to use of the empire. The state demanded ultimate allegiance. Thus, the state and its leaders took on, what we would call, “religious significance.”

    So, when the message of Jesus comes on the scene proclaiming Him as “Lord and Savior,” His followers are not using “religious language” but are borrowing from secular. They are saying that there is an allegiance higher than all earthly kingdoms. Thus, is it any wonder that this was seen as a threat to the peace and stability of Rome? It was actually this implied threat that helped seal Jesus’s fate. Remember, the crowd at Jesus’s trial shouted: “If you release this man, you are no ‘friend of Caesar.’ Anyone who declares himself a king is a rebel against Caesar” (John 19:12). And so, Jesus was executed by Rome.

    Now, today’s Christians have the opposite difficulty the Roman state had against Christians. Since we live in the wake of 2,000 years of Christian influence, we have a hard time processing the audacious claims of Jesus. We have a hard time seeing how our “private and personal” beliefs could be a threat to anyone. However, Jesus is not just your “personal Savior and Lord;” He’s Lord…of all!

    Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective.

    “In those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered. This was the first registration when Quirinius was governor of Syria. And all went to be registered, each to his own town. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, from the town of Nazareth, to Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and lineage of David, to be registered with Mary, his betrothed, who was with child. And while they were there, the time came for her to give birth. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

    And in the same region there were shepherds out in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. And an angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were filled with great fear. And the angel said to them, 'Fear not, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.'"

    ~ Luke 2:1-11 (ESV)

    Thank you for listening to and supporting The Kingdom Perspective! The Kingdom Perspective is a ministry of Christ Redeemer Church of Hanover, NH. To hear more episodes you can subscribe on Apple Podcasts. To donate or to find out more about the ministry and resources offered by Christ Redeemer Church visit www.christredeemerchurch.org.

    • 1 min
    A Different Kind of Community

    A Different Kind of Community

    Transcript:

    Hello, this is Pastor Don Willeman of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective.

    The kind of community that the New Testament calls us to is radically different than what you may find in the world. Non-Christians create all sorts of different communities where people feel welcomed and at home, and many times it’s really quite wonderful. But such community is based on affinities such as shared hobbies or interests, political alignments, racial, ethnic or sexual identities, etc. The community that the gospel calls us to is not based on any of these but is rooted in a shared experience of the love of Jesus. “We love because He first loved us” (1 John 4:19).

    Now, the “problem” with the love of Jesus is that it is indiscriminate. It is a love that comes to us in spite of us. It comes to us not because of our performance or pedigree but because of Jesus’s performance and pedigree. It assumes our unworthiness, but embraces His. This means that the love of Jesus forces me together with those that have differing natural affinities, maybe even those that I struggle with.

    The Apostle Paul put it this way. Becoming a Christian is:

    a renewal [i.e. a radical makeover of identity] in which there is no distinction between Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave and freeman, but Christ is all, and in all. (Colossians 3:11)

    Today, we might say, there is neither Republican or Democrat, black or white, privileged or under-privileged, “woke” or “non-woke”, but Christ is all, and in all.

    The test of whether you have truly believed and received the grace of Jesus for yourself is how gladly you extend that grace to others, especially those for whom, by your natural standards, you would have no affinity.

    Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective.

    “Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have put off the old self with its practices and have put on the new self, which is being renewed in knowledge after the image of its creator. Here there is not Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free; but Christ is all, and in all.”

    ~ Colossians 3:9-11 (ESV)

    • 1 min
    A City on a Hill

    A City on a Hill

    Transcript:

    Hello, this is Pastor Don Willeman of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective.

    The Christian knows that this world will never be perfected until Jesus returns. Nonetheless, we do believe that the church should have a positive/redemptive effect on society in the here-and-now.

    But how exactly are we to do this? Well, we do this by being the church—by demonstrating a new society, a new way of living together.

    Jesus put it this way,

    “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, [Jesus goes on to say] let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 5:13-16)

    Jesus tells us that we are to be a city on a hill—that is we are to demonstrate a new social arrangement visible for all to see. Note well, that He does not say we are to be a “chump on a stump.” We are not to be individual moral prudes merely spouting our religious opinions and moral platitudes. Rather, we are to be a city—that is an alternative society. We are to be a community that is redemptive in the midst of an otherwise rancorous culture. We are to be the church.

    Thus, the way we live in community, as the church, is the key element. The most distinctive and attractive thing about us is not merely our individual lives or families, but our corporate life as the church, the family of God. How we treat one another makes us shine like a lighthouse, guiding others to safe harbor.

    So, here’s the question: Does your interaction within the church shine like a thing of beauty? Does your attitude toward your fellow believers exude a positivity, fostering greater trust and community?

    Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective.

    “You are the salt of the earth; but if the salt has become tasteless, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled under foot by men.

    You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden; nor does anyone light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on the lamp stand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light shine before men in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven.”

    ~ Matthew 5:13-16 (NASB)

    • 1 min
    The Redemptive Optimism of Another World

    The Redemptive Optimism of Another World

    Transcript:

    Hello, this is Pastor Don Willeman of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective.

    In one very profound sense Christians do not live for this world. And, because of that, in a very profound sense that’s the best possible thing for this world.

    What do I mean?

    Think of it this way. What causes all the injustice and fighting in this world? In large part it is driven by those people lying, stealing and cheating in order to get worldly gain over others that are likewise lying, stealing and cheating in order to do the same. This vicious cycle of envying spirals to the point of misery and even murder.

    What drives this obsession? Underneath is a belief that this world is all there is. Simply put, you only go around once. And so, if I don’t get my way in the here and now, I’ll never get it.

    However, the Christian is driven by a different vision of the world. She believes and knows that this world is not all there is. Rather, this world is a kind of testing ground for a renewed world yet to come. In the yet-to-come world, God has promised unimaginable delights to all who trust and obey him in the here and now.

    Now, what’s the effect of this? The effect, I think, is quite obvious. Those trusting in this promise from God will live differently in the here and now, because they know the best is yet to come. They will have patience when mistreated, kindness when slandered, courage in the face of opposition, perseverance in doing good, and generosity with their material possession. Why? All because they have a hope that goes beyond here-and-now.

    Is this what drives you?

    Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective.

    Someone in the crowd said to Him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But He said to him, “Man, who appointed Me a judge or arbitrator over you?” Then He said to them, “Beware, and be on your guard against every form of greed; for not even when one has an abundance does his life consist of his possessions.” And He told them a parable, saying, “The land of a rich man was very productive. And he began reasoning to himself, saying, ‘What shall I do, since I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘This is what I will do: I will tear down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, “Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years to come; take your ease, eat, drink and be merry.”’ But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your soul is required of you; and now who will own what you have prepared?’ So is the man who stores up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.”

    ~ Luke 12:13-21 (NASB)

    • 1 min
    The Freedom of Bonhoeffer

    The Freedom of Bonhoeffer

    Transcript:

    Hello, this is Pastor Don Willeman of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective.

    We are easily tempted to both judge others and live under the judgment of others. This dynamic is toxic both to us and to our relationships with one another.

    However, in the gospel, we are called to live under God’s assessment of us, and not set ourselves or others up as the judge.

    The theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer tells us that being a Christian means living under the judgment Jesus alone. Bonhoeffer was referencing the fact that as human beings we can’t help but live under the assessment of some law, some gaze by which we are judged. We were made to live under the gaze of God, but when we reject Him, something else will take its place.

    Therefore, in times of social tension, we tend to feel the heat of living under the gaze of others more acutely. Am I socially aware enough? Am I responding to this crisis or that crisis properly? Am I sensitive to this issue or that issue enough?

    As a Christian you are free from the judgment of others and, perhaps even more profoundly, from the judgment of your own conscience. Why? Not because there is no standard to which you are called and by which you will be judged. No! Rather, because Jesus, the ultimate judge, was judged for you. The true Judge has already rendered His verdict and He did so on the cross.

    This is tremendously liberating, and when properly understood leads us not to dismiss others and their concerns, but to serve them—just like Jesus did for you.

    Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective.

    “Let a man regard us in this manner, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. In this case, moreover, it is required of stewards that one be found trustworthy. But to me it is a very small thing that I may be examined by you, or by any human court; in fact, I do not even examine myself. For I am conscious of nothing against myself, yet I am not by this acquitted; but the one who examines me is the Lord. Therefore do not go on passing judgment before the time, but wait until the Lord comes who will both bring to light the things hidden in the darkness and disclose the motives of men’s hearts; and then each man’s praise will come to him from God.”

    ~ 1 Corinthians 4:1-5 (NASB)

    • 1 min
    Watson on the Weakness of our Faith

    Watson on the Weakness of our Faith

    Transcript:

    Hello, this is Pastor Don Willeman of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective.

    Sometimes we can struggle to have patience with the weakness we see in others. This impatience speaks not to our superiority but to our sin. God is patient with the weak.

    Worse, sometimes we can struggle to have patience with weakness in ourselves. We are disappointed with the weakness of our own faith. Again, this speaks more to our sin than it does to our faith. In our sinful pride, we judge and condemn ourselves.

    The good news is that God’s grace is no match for our sinful pride. God can more readily save the sinner than the one who thinks he is righteous; he can more readily save the weak than the one who thinks himself strong. The weak reach out their hand for help. That is the hand of faith. The one who thinks he is strong never reaches out his hand for divine help. His hand is too strong to need God’s grace. He has no faith, because he’s convinced he needs no grace.

    The great Puritan preacher Thomas Watson put it this way:

    “The weakest believer is a member of Christ as well as the strongest; and the weakest member of the body [of Christ] shall not perish. Christ will cut off rotten members, but not weak members. Therefore, Christian, be not discouraged. God, who would have us receive them that are weak in faith, will not himself refuse [us]. Rom 14: 1.”
    ~Thomas Watson (1620-1686), Cambridge (Emmanuel College) graduate and Puritan pastor in his work The Ten Commandments

    My friend, God is tender and gentle with the weakness of your faith. It is not the strength of your faith that saves you but the strength of Christ. Your faith may be small. Your Savior is big.

    Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective.

    “As for the one who is weak in faith, welcome him, but not to quarrel over opinions…. Who are you to pass judgment on the servant of another? It is before his own master that he stands or falls. And he will be upheld, for the Lord is able to make him stand.

    Why do you pass judgment on your brother? Or you, why do you despise your brother? For we will all stand before the judgment seat of God; for it is written,

    “As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me,
    and every tongue shall confess to God.”
    So then each of us will give an account of himself to God.

    Therefore let us not pass judgment on one another any longer, but rather decide never to put a stumbling block or hindrance in the way of a brother…. So then let us pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding.”

    ~ Romans 14:1-19 (ESV)

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Christianity