131 episodes

The Lumen Christi Institute for Catholic Thought was founded by Catholic scholars at the University of Chicago in 1997 to bring the light of Christ and the Catholic intellectual and spiritual tradition to the secular academy and the general public. On this station we make available our many lectures and programs, as well as interviews with visiting scholars.

To support our work, visit www.lumenchristi.org/donate

The Lumen Christi Institute The Lumen Christi Institute

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 5.0 • 11 Ratings

The Lumen Christi Institute for Catholic Thought was founded by Catholic scholars at the University of Chicago in 1997 to bring the light of Christ and the Catholic intellectual and spiritual tradition to the secular academy and the general public. On this station we make available our many lectures and programs, as well as interviews with visiting scholars.

To support our work, visit www.lumenchristi.org/donate

    David Meconi S.J. - Ambrose and Augustine on Christian Holiness

    David Meconi S.J. - Ambrose and Augustine on Christian Holiness

    While Saints Ambrose and Augustine never define Christian holiness, this was the pursuit that fueled all of their writings, all of their sermons, and directed their everyday lives. By examining the writings of these two pillars of the Western Church, today's talk seeks to show how Ambrose and Augustine understood holiness and what that might mean for our lives today.

    Originally presented as a live webinar April 17th, 2021. Presented by the Lumen Christi Institute and the Bollandist Society as part of a webinar series on the saints.

    • 55 min
    Hosffman Ospino - Teaching Catholic Doctrine en Español

    Hosffman Ospino - Teaching Catholic Doctrine en Español

    Language matters, and it matters much when sharing the best of our faith convictions with one another. Without language there is no communication, understanding or community. Sharing faith in the United States of America in an increasingly Hispanic church demands that we take questions associated with language seriously. Nearly fifteen million Catholics in the U.S. are Spanish-speaking immigrants. Many are raising their children “in Spanish.” Even though the vast majority of Hispanics are U.S. born and English-speaking, Spanish constantly shapes their cultural and religious imagination. In this presentation, we will reflect on the intersectionality of language, culture and religious identity among U.S. Hispanic Catholics at the time of sharing the faith and reflect theologically. To teach Catholic doctrine “en español,” literally or metaphorically, is an invitation to embrace the many creative ways in which God calls us to be church in the twenty-first century.

    This lecture with Professor Hosffman Ospino (Boston College) was originally presented as a live webinar lecture April 13, 2021. This event is part of a webinar series on Hispanic Theology, made possible by a generous grant from the Our Sunday Visitor Institute.

    • 1 hr 24 min
    The Origins of Mass Incarceration: The Courts and the 1960s Criminal Procedure Revolution?

    The Origins of Mass Incarceration: The Courts and the 1960s Criminal Procedure Revolution?

    A discussion with Judge Stephanos Bibas (3rd Circuit, Court of Appeals) and William Pizzi (University of Colorado Law School), moderated by Cook County Judge Tom Donnelly.

    American principles of justice and equality lead our culture to value the criminal trial as a fair hearing for the accused and vindication for the victims of crime. But the reality of the U.S. justice system falls far short of this ideal, making criminal trials the rare exception amidst a wave of plea bargains. When trials do take place, judges are often forced to impose mandatory sentences that do not fit the unique context of a given case.

    Join Judge Stephanos Bibas from the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, and author of The Machinery of Criminal Justice (Oxford University Press, 2015), and Professor William Pizzi, as they discuss Pizzi’s new book, The Supreme Court’s Role in Mass Incarceration (Routledge, 2020). Pizzi provocatively argues that the Supreme Court’s attempts to expand defendants’ rights in the 20th century unexpectedly led to the mass incarceration crisis today. He points to Canada as a beacon of hope, where an unelected, professional judiciary customizes sentences to fit the actual case. Unlike American courts, where judges are forced by repeat-offender laws to sentence defendants to decades for a minor offense, Canada's judiciary freely metes out proportionate sentencing.  

    This event is part of the Catholic Criminal Justice Reform Network, a new initiative of the Lumen Christi Institute. This event is co-sponsored by Georgetown University Law Center, Notre Dame Law School, Boston College Law School, the University of St. Thomas School of Law, the Catholic Lawyers Guild of Chicago, Catholic Prison Ministry Coalition, Kolbe House Jail Ministry, Seattle University, the Seattle University Crime and Justice Research Center, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, the Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage, Fordham University School of Law, the Institute on Religion, Law and Lawyer’s Work at Fordham University School of Law, The Center on Race, Law, and Justice (Fordham University School of Law), the University of Denver College of Law Federalist Society, and the University of Colorado Federalist Society

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Elizabeth Lev - A Good Man Is Hard to Find: St. Joseph in Art

    Elizabeth Lev - A Good Man Is Hard to Find: St. Joseph in Art

    A webinar lecture with Elizabeth Lev(Duquesne University). This event is co-presented by the Harvard Catholic Forum and the Lumen Christi Institute.

    St. Joseph was an unassuming latecomer to the history of art, but once discovered, his images evolved rapidly to serve the Catholic Church during challenging times. From model for the papacy, to symbol of marriage and fatherhood, to guide for a good death and advocate for the worker, St Joseph's many guises have made him one of the Church's greatest spiritual treasures. Following Pope Francis' dedication of 2021 to St. Joseph, this talk will look at Giotto, Raphael, Murillo and others as we uncover the many faces of this quiet saint.

    This event co-sponsored by the Saint Benedict Institute, the Nova Forum, the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies, the Ars Vivendi Arts Initiative of the Collegium Institute, the St. Paul’s Catholic Center, the St. Lawrence Institute for Faith and Culture, and the New England Chapter of the Patron of the Arts Vatican Museums.

    • 1 hr
    Fr. Thomas Esposito, O.Cist - How to Be a Corinthian

    Fr. Thomas Esposito, O.Cist - How to Be a Corinthian

    A webinar lecture with Fr. Thomas Esposito, O.Cist (University of Dallas). This event is cosponsored by Calvert House Catholic Center.

    The first recipients of St. Paul's letters did not keep their letters to themselves; as part of the organic life of the Church that Catholics call "Tradition," the letters of Paul were collected together and incorporated into the New Testament. One amazing consequence of this Tradition at work is that everyone who reads these letters, regardless of time or place, becomes a Corinthian, or a Roman, or an Ephesian, thanks to the unifying power of the Holy Spirit. This conference will reflect on how the early Church received these letters, and highlight specific texts that reveal how the voice of St. Paul still reaches us, both individuals and the Body of Christ collectively, today.

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Fragile Democracy: Technocratic Takeover and Popular Renewal

    Fragile Democracy: Technocratic Takeover and Popular Renewal

    A panel discussion with Charles Taylor (McGill University), Patrizia Nanz (German Federal Office for the Safety of Nuclear Waste Management), and Jason Blakely (Pepperdine University), moderated by Fr. Patrick Gilger, SJ (New School for Social Research). 

    We are experiencing a crisis of democracy more powerful than anything seen in a generation: inequality continues at a galloping pace; policing is increasingly racialized and militarized; political decision-making appears remote and divorced from the lives of ordinary people.

    This panel discussion—including renowned philosopher Charles Taylor--will consider sources and solutions to the present crisis of democracy by drawing on two recent books: "Reconstructing Democracy" by Charles Taylor, Patrizia Nanz, and Madeleine Beaubien Taylor and "We Built Reality" by Jason Blakely. 

    Both works identify within our political and cultural crisis the loss of democratic participation and the rise of top-down technocratic, managerial rule.

    This event is co-presented by the Lumen Christi Institute and the Nova Forum and co-sponsored by America Media, the Collegium Institute, the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago, and the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies.

    • 1 hr 23 min

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