223 episodes

Welcome to the Make Your Movie Podcast with Dave Bullis. Each week Dave interviews a film industry professionals and demystifies the filmmaking and screenwriting process. From Oscar Winners to screenwriting legends to micro-budget masters, there's something in the podcast for everyone!

The Make Your Movie Podcast: A Filmmaking and Screenwriting Show IFH Podcast Network

    • TV & Film
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Welcome to the Make Your Movie Podcast with Dave Bullis. Each week Dave interviews a film industry professionals and demystifies the filmmaking and screenwriting process. From Oscar Winners to screenwriting legends to micro-budget masters, there's something in the podcast for everyone!

    BONUS: Rise of the Filmtrepreneur - Listen to Two Chapters for FREE

    BONUS: Rise of the Filmtrepreneur - Listen to Two Chapters for FREE

    Alex Ferrari's game-changing book Rise of the Filmtrepreneur®: How to Turn Your Indie Film into a Moneymaking Business has become an Amazon Best Seller. We are so excited to share this with you, the IFH Tribe. He's been working for months to make this happen. We wanted to give you a sneak peek at the book so in this episode, We'll be releasing the first two chapters of the audiobook for your listening pleasure. These two chapters set the tone for the book. In the episode, we even show you a way to download the entire book for free.

    Here's a bit of what Rise of the Filmtrepreneur has to offer:

    It’s harder today than ever before for independent filmmakers to make money with their films. From predatory film distributors ripping them off to huckster film aggregators who prey upon them, the odds are stacked against the indie filmmaker. The old distribution model for making money with indie film is broken and there needs to be a change. The future of independent filmmaking is the entrepreneurial filmmaker or the Filmtrepreneur®. 

    In Rise of the Filmtrepreneur® author and filmmaker Alex Ferrari breaks down how to actually make money with independent film projects and shows filmmakers how to turn their indie films into profitable businesses. This is not all theory, Alex uses multiple real-world case studies to illustrate each part of his method. This book shows you the step by step way to turn your filmmaking passion into a profitable career. If you are making a feature film, series or any kind of video content, The Filmtrepreneur® Method will set you up for success.

    I really hope you enjoy Rise of the Filmtrepreneur. I truly believe that the only way indie filmmakers will be able to survive the new film economy is by becoming Filmtrepreneurs. My goal for this book is to show filmmakers and creatives that they have to think differently. The old film economy is DEAD. Traditional film distribution is not set up to benefit the indie filmmaker. The cards are stacked against the creative and things need to change.

    Filmmakers need to take back control of their films and how they generate revenue from them. The day of handing over your film to a predatory film distributor because you believe there is no other choice is over! There is another way and the Filmtrepreneur Method is that way. Let us know what you think of the book.

    Enjoy and VIVA LA REVOLUTION!

    • 28 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Introducing My New Weekly Podcast with Guest Musical Icon Moby

    BONUS EPISODE: Introducing My New Weekly Podcast with Guest Musical Icon Moby

    I've been working on a new podcast for sometime now. Introduction Next Level Soul. The podcast that asks the big questions about living, evolving and thriving in the world today. The show attempts to answer those questions by having candid and inspiring conversations with thought leaders from every walk of life.

    • 48 min
    BONUS EPISODE: From Forrest Gump to Dune - Adventures Screenwriting in Hollywood with Oscar® Winner Eric Roth

    BONUS EPISODE: From Forrest Gump to Dune - Adventures Screenwriting in Hollywood with Oscar® Winner Eric Roth

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Edward Burns: The Art of the $9000 Micro Budget Indie Film

    Edward Burns: The Art of the $9000 Micro Budget Indie Film

    Today’s guest is a writer, director, producer, actor and indie filmmaking legend Edward Burns.

    Many of you might have heard of the Sundance Film Festival winning film called The Brothers McMullen, his iconic first film that tells the story of three Irish Catholic brothers from Long Island who struggle to deal with love, marriage, and infidelity. His cinderella story of making the film, getting into Sundance and launching his career is the stuff of legend.

    The Brothers McMullen was sold to Fox Searchlight and went on to make over $10 million at the box office on a $27,000 budget, making it one of the most successful indie films of the decade.

    Ed went off to star in huge films like Saving Private Ryan for Steven Spielberg and direct studio films like the box office hit She’s The One. The films about the love lives of two brothers, Mickey and Francis, interconnect as Francis cheats on his wife with Mickey’s ex-girlfriend, while Mickey impulsively marries a stranger.

    Even after his mainstream success as an actor, writer and director he still never forgot his indie roots. He continued to quietly produce completely independent feature films on really low budgets. How low, how about $9000. As with any smart filmmaker, Ed has continued to not only produce films but to consider new methods of getting his projects to the world.

    In 2007, he teamed up with Apple iTunes to release an exclusive film Purple Violets. It was a sign of the times that the director was branching out to new methods of release for his projects.

    In addition, he also continued to release works with his signature tried-and-true method of filmmaking. Using a very small $25,000 budget and a lot of resourcefulness, Burns created Nice Guy Johnny in 2010.

    In his book, Independent Ed: Inside a Career of Big Dreams, Little Movies, and the Twelve Best Days of My Life (which I recommend ALL filmmakers read), Ed mentions some rules he dubbed “McMullen 2.0” which were basically a set of rules for independent filmmakers to shoot by.

    Actors would have to work for virtually nothing.
    The film should take no longer than 12 days to film and get into the can
    Don’t shoot with any more than a three-man crew
    Actor’s use their own clothes
    Actors do their own hair and make-up
    Ask and beg for any locations
    Use the resources you have at your disposal

    I used similar rules when I shot my feature films This is Meg, which I shot that in 8 days and On the Corner of Ego and Desire which I shot in 4 days. To be honest Ed was one of my main inspirations when I decided to make my first micro-budget feature film, along with Mark and Jay Duplass, Joe Swanberg and Michael and Mark Polish.

    Ed has continued to have an amazing career directing films like The Fitzgerald Family Christmas, The Groomsmen, Looking for Kitty, Ash Wednesday, Sidewalks of New York, No Looking Back and many more.

    Ed has continued to give back to the indie film community with his amazing book, lectures and his knowledge bomb packed director commentaries. Trust me go out and buy the DVD versions of all his films. His commentaries are worth the price of admission.

    When I first spoke to Ed he told that he had been a fan of the podcast for a while. As you can imagine I was floored and humbled at the same time. Getting to sit-down and speak to a filmmaker that had such an impact my own directing career was a dream come true. Ed is an inspiration to so many indie filmmakers around the world and I’m honored to bring this epic conversation to the tribe.

    Enjoy my conversation with Edward Burns.

    • 1 hr 44 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Richard Linklater - Slacker, Indie Cinema & How to Become a Filmmaker

    BONUS EPISODE: Richard Linklater - Slacker, Indie Cinema & How to Become a Filmmaker

    Well I put out an episode back in 2019 putting my dream list of guests out into the universe and in the past four months I've been humbled to have some amazing filmmakers and screenwriters on the show. Incredibly one of those dream guests has made his way on the show today. 

    We are joined by indie film icon and Oscar® nominated writer/director Richard Linklater. Richard was one of the filmmakers who helped to launch the independent film movement that we know today with his classic 1991 indie film Slacker. So today, we will not only dive into the extraordinary career of Richard Linklater but also that of collaborator and longtime friend writer/director Katie Cokinos.

    If this is your introduction to Linklater and his work, here are a few highlights you must know; Linklater helped launch the 90s indie film renaissance with his film Slacker.

    The producer, director has juggled the TV, film, short-film, and documentary genres seamlessly over his career - typically focusing in fine detail on generational rites and mores with rare compassion and understanding while definitively capturing the 20-something culture of his era through a series of nuanced, illuminating ensemble pieces which introduced any number of talented young actors into the Hollywood eco-system.

    One of the talents to emerge from this era is the Texas native, Matthew McConaughey in Linklater’s third movie and VHS smash hit, Dazed and Confused. Based on Linklater’s years at Huntsville High School and the people he encountered there, the film shadows the adventures of high school and junior high students on the last day of school in May 1976.

    Throughout his career Richard has chosen to tell stories about the human condition, while many times making us laugh and cry at the same time. I found an immense philosophical under current to most of his life's work. From The Before Trilogy to Boyhood, his films tackle topics in an honest, raw and deeper way that is not normally seen in filmmaking.

    Many of the actors who work with Richard call him the "Zen Director" on set. His philosophy can be felt throughout his work. He often tells long and transformative coming of age stories over years, if not decades, something that is unique to him.

    His Oscar® nominated film Boyhood is a groundbreaking story of growing up as seen through the eyes of a child named Mason (a breakthrough performance by Ellar Coltrane), who literally grows up on screen before our eyes. Starring Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette as Mason's parents and newcomer Lorelei Linklater as his sister Samantha, BOYHOOD charts the rocky terrain of childhood like no other film has before.

    Snapshots of adolescence from road trips and family dinners to birthdays and graduations and all the moments in between become transcendent, set to a soundtrack spanning the years from Coldplay's Yellow to Arcade Fire's Deep Blue. BOYHOOD is both a nostalgic time capsule of the recent past and an ode to growing up and parenting. It's impossible to watch Mason and his family without thinking about our own journey.

    Now the other remarkable filmmaker in this conversation is Katie Cokinos. She has made over ten short films and in 2000 wrote, directed, and acted in the feature film, Portrait of a Girl as a Young Catwhich premiered at SXSW.  Katie produced Eagle Pennell’s film, Heart Full of Soul (1990); was a publicist for Richard Linklater’s Slacker, (1990).  She was the Managing Director of the Austin Film Society, 1990-95.

    Her latest film is the coming of age story I Dream Too Much, co-produced by Richard. Here's a bit about the film:

    Presents a day in the life in Austin, Texas among its social outcasts and misfits, predominantly the twenty-something set, using a series of linear vignettes. These characters, who in some manner just don't fit into the establishment norms, move seamlessly from one scene to the next,...

    • 2 hr 7 min
    CROSSOVER: Oliver Stone - Directing, Screenwriting and Surviving the Vicious Hollywood Game

    CROSSOVER: Oliver Stone - Directing, Screenwriting and Surviving the Vicious Hollywood Game

    Today on the show I bring you one of the most influential and iconic filmmakers in the history of cinema, three-time Oscar® winner Oliver Stone. Throughout his legendary career, Oliver Stone has served as director, writer, and producer on a variety of films, documentaries, and television movies. His films have been nominated for forthy two Oscars® and have won twelve.

    I hope this conversation inspires filmmakers and screenwriters to never give up. Oliver struggled for years taking jobs as a production assistant, cab driver, office assistant, and any other gig he could find to help him survive while he was chasing his dream. He wrote and wrote, meeting his goal of one to two screenplays a year, no matter what. Never give up, never surrender.

    Enjoy my epic conversation with Oliver Stone.

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

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1 Rating

Numbrobot6754 ,

Dave is da man!!

Dave is an awesome podcaster. Love his style. The show has a TON of great guests and info.

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