23 min

The Mighty Issue of Evangelical Pragmatism Always Ready

    • Society & Culture

Today on the podcast, I dive into the issue of pragmatism. What is pragmatism? Why does it matter and what does it look like when churches base themselves in pragmatism? In this episode, I discuss these issues and bring Scripture to bear on the subject.



Show notes:



Merriam Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pragmatism)

“an American movement in philosophy founded by C. S. Peirce and William James and marked by the doctrines that the meaning of conceptions is to be sought in their practical bearings, that the function of thought is to guide action, and that truth is preeminently to be tested by the practical consequences of belief”

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/pragmatism/)

“Pragmatism is a philosophical tradition that – very broadly – understands knowing the world as inseparable from agency within it. This general idea has attracted a remarkably rich and at times contrary range of interpretations, including: that all philosophical concepts should be tested via scientific experimentation, that a claim is true if and only if it is useful (relatedly: if a philosophical theory does not contribute directly to social progress then it is not worth much), that experience consists in transacting with rather than representing nature, that articulate language rests on a deep bed of shared human practices that can never be fully ‘made explicit’.”

R.C. Sproul (Article Titled: Principle vs. Pragmatism) (https://www.ligonier.org/learn/articles/principle-vs-pragmatism)

“What is pragmatism? Pragmatism is the only philosophy native to America. Pragmatism eschews any hope of discovering ultimate truth. It is skeptical with respect to objective principles of righteousness and defines truth as “that which works.” In this philosophy, the end always justifies the means. The driving force behind decisions within the scope of pragmatism is the force of expediency."



You can find articles at thechristianmanifesto.org 



You can find Jared Lincks on Twitter here:

https://twitter.com/JaredLincks



And on Facebook here:

https://www.facebook.com/jl1689



God Bless!

Today on the podcast, I dive into the issue of pragmatism. What is pragmatism? Why does it matter and what does it look like when churches base themselves in pragmatism? In this episode, I discuss these issues and bring Scripture to bear on the subject.



Show notes:



Merriam Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pragmatism)

“an American movement in philosophy founded by C. S. Peirce and William James and marked by the doctrines that the meaning of conceptions is to be sought in their practical bearings, that the function of thought is to guide action, and that truth is preeminently to be tested by the practical consequences of belief”

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/pragmatism/)

“Pragmatism is a philosophical tradition that – very broadly – understands knowing the world as inseparable from agency within it. This general idea has attracted a remarkably rich and at times contrary range of interpretations, including: that all philosophical concepts should be tested via scientific experimentation, that a claim is true if and only if it is useful (relatedly: if a philosophical theory does not contribute directly to social progress then it is not worth much), that experience consists in transacting with rather than representing nature, that articulate language rests on a deep bed of shared human practices that can never be fully ‘made explicit’.”

R.C. Sproul (Article Titled: Principle vs. Pragmatism) (https://www.ligonier.org/learn/articles/principle-vs-pragmatism)

“What is pragmatism? Pragmatism is the only philosophy native to America. Pragmatism eschews any hope of discovering ultimate truth. It is skeptical with respect to objective principles of righteousness and defines truth as “that which works.” In this philosophy, the end always justifies the means. The driving force behind decisions within the scope of pragmatism is the force of expediency."



You can find articles at thechristianmanifesto.org 



You can find Jared Lincks on Twitter here:

https://twitter.com/JaredLincks



And on Facebook here:

https://www.facebook.com/jl1689



God Bless!

23 min