258 episodes

Fast Company deputy editor Kathleen Davis takes listeners on a journey through the changing landscape of our work lives. Each episode explores the future of work, including the state of remote and hybrid work amid the return-to-office battle; how AI will change the way we do our jobs; the status of gender equity and DEI efforts; rethinking career ladders and ambition; motivation and what makes work meaningful; and the progress on mental health and disability issues at work. And as if all that isn’t enough, she also shares practical advice for interviews, résumés, and salary negotiations, as well as the latest office jargon, just how useful personality tests really are, and more.

The New Way We Work Fast Company

    • Business
    • 4.4 • 100 Ratings

Fast Company deputy editor Kathleen Davis takes listeners on a journey through the changing landscape of our work lives. Each episode explores the future of work, including the state of remote and hybrid work amid the return-to-office battle; how AI will change the way we do our jobs; the status of gender equity and DEI efforts; rethinking career ladders and ambition; motivation and what makes work meaningful; and the progress on mental health and disability issues at work. And as if all that isn’t enough, she also shares practical advice for interviews, résumés, and salary negotiations, as well as the latest office jargon, just how useful personality tests really are, and more.

    Work is ableist

    Work is ableist

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 61 million adults in the United States have at least one disability, and for nearly half that population, the disability is invisible or at least not apparent. These conditions often don’t manifest in ways that are immediately evident to others—such as chronic pain, diabetes, autism, ADHD, learning disabilities, arthritis, and more. And although the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed in 1990 to protect against discrimination, many employees or job candidates are reluctant or scared to disclose a disability for fear they wouldn’t be treated fairly or even get hired in the first place. And it seems many employers are clueless about what they’re doing wrong. So how can we make advocacy easier, open up opportunities, and build a world of work that works for everyone? Ludmila Praslova, a professor of psychology at Vanguard University, recently wrote about how her autism affected her onboarding experience at a new job. In her new book, ‘The Canary Code: A Guide to Neurodiversity, Dignity, and Intersectional Belonging at Work,’ Praslova delves into the challenges of self-advocacy, disclosing a disability, and what employers need to change to create neuro-inclusive environments.

    • 40 min
    The workday is poorly designed

    The workday is poorly designed

    We take for granted the standard 40-hour, 5-day workweek, but this structured schedule was implemented to suit a very different reality than most of us work and live in today. In recent years, the 4-day workweek has gained attention. But that kind of restructuring seems to leave many with more logistical questions than answers: What about parents trying to match a school schedule, or sleep-deprived medical workers, or service workers who usually don’t know their scheduling needs in advance? Is there a way to redesign the workday and workweek to accommodate the needs of both employees and businesses—in a way that’s humane and can also work across industries? It’s a problem that Mark Takano continues address in Congress, as the representative from California’s 39th district. Takano introduced a 32-hour workweek bill in 2021 and is also pushing to restore the Overtime Act, which would increase the threshold for full-time salaried workers nationally.

    • 34 min
    Why so many of us feel lonely at work

    Why so many of us feel lonely at work

    Leaders have tried to sell work as ‘one big family’ for years. With the proliferation of terms like ‘office besties’ and ‘work spouses,’ many employees have viewed work as a type of family too. But anyone who has been passed over for a promotion they deserved or laid off after years of hard work knows the hard truth: Work isn’t your family. In fact, work can make people feel lonely by preventing them from connecting with their community, and some mental health experts have called loneliness a health epidemic. So, how can we prioritize our mental health and our ambition at the same time? How can we feel less alone at work and foster meaningful relationships while still protecting our ‘real lives’? To dig into these questions for answers, we talked with Ann Shoket, former editor-in-chief of ‘Seventeen’ magazine; author of ‘The Big Life,’ a guide for career-driven young women; and CEO of TheLi.st, a private community of innovators across media, technology, and business.

    • 32 min
    Hiring is broken

    Hiring is broken

    Even as the nature of work changes and innovations transform our jobs, the hiring process feels stuck in the same biased, ineffective rut. Too often, when companies finds themselves with an open position, they fall back on the same broken methods: mining leadership’s narrow, professional networks, or posting the same ineffective job ads in the same places. So how can we fix a system that’s so ingrained in the traditional corporate psyche? How can we really reach unexpected and underrepresented candidates? If it were possible to, say, burn the whole thing down and start from scratch, what would a new, more effective hiring process look like? We put that question to Kimberly Brown, founder of Manifest Yourself, a consulting company focused on career development for women and people of color. Brown, who sees both companies and job candidates struggling with poor communication and too few resources, believes that a few key changes could start to improve the experience for everyone.

    • 40 min
    Nobody knows how much anybody is making

    Nobody knows how much anybody is making

    No matter what job you have, you’ve probably felt at various points in your career that you don’t make enough. And because money can be a taboo topic, we rarely reveal what our salaries are—even with the people we’re closest to. In a recent survey, only about half the participants said they share their salary with family members, while just 32% said they share how much they make with close friends. This secrecy helps keep gender, racial, and executive-to-worker pay gaps thriving. Fortunately, the tide has been slowly turning in the past few years. More companies have adopted at least partial-salary-transparency policies, and even some states and cities have introduced laws supporting salary transparency or salary ranges. Hannah Williams, a content creator and host of the TikTok channel, Salary Transparent Street, has a knack for talking to people about salaries. She believes that it’s a conversation we need to have in order to make work a better deal for everyone.

    • 33 min
    Hard work isn’t (always) rewarded

    Hard work isn’t (always) rewarded

    One of the secret problems with work is that hard work alone isn’t enough to get ahead. It’s a tough wake-up call for those of us who spent our school years working to get all As and doing all the things we were told were the key to a successful life. The truth is, work—and the rest of the “real world”—isn’t a meritocracy. The most hard-working, and even the smartest or most-talented, people aren’t always the ones who end up in power. So if hard work alone isn’t what matters, what does? And is there a way to shift what we value to make things more fair? Jill Katz, founder of Assemble HR Consulting, focuses on answering these questions of culture and change in the workplace.

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
100 Ratings

100 Ratings

24fps Productions ,

Re: Mistakes to avoid when writing your resume.

I found this episode helpful, and especially liked the discussion about including a “Hobby” section at the end, as a way to help telegraph the personality you bring to the table.

Having been on both sides of the hiring process, though, I was surprised that there was no mention of the role of ATS… Applicant Tracking Systems. The tips herein presume that your resume is in the hands of a human being, when in fact, these ATS systems can kick qualified applicants out or to the bottom of the candidate pool, never to be seen by a human eye.

There’s several articles online about these “Hidden Workers” - untapped talent that never get considered because their resumes are never actually looked at.

EastEndPghPetiteGurl ,

Relevant, well produced content! Hybrid, Remote, Environment, and criticism of out dated models

I came across this in searching for great content that is nuanced and professional regarding being a hybrid and fully remote computer worker as a paralegal. And meetings that could be shortened to weekly one-on-one, a few people as needed, and no meetings longer than 40 minutes as the research shows; and also no meetings with more than 6 participants. My word search resulted in 3 great episodes and I’ve subscribed. (love the catchy instrumental song at the end too!)

1. Designing an Office Workers actually want to return to
2. How to fix everything that’s wrong with meetings
3. What your company probably got wrong about its return-to-office

I’ve subscribed and will recommend to those who are interested!

Relevant, well produced content! Hybrid, Remote, Environment, and criticism of out dated models

timmy1968😳 ,

Good, but…

As a non-millennial, this is a great podcast for leaders as it gives great ideas to consider as we navigate the pandemic. It is slightly offensive that “white men” is used in such a stereotypical fashion of “bad leadership” or “narcissistic behavior”. In fact, this week’s episode used it 5 times. There are exceptional leaders of every race, gender, religion, sexual orientation and political beliefs, likewise there are really bad ones. Leadership has to come from the heart and the brain. Success to me is when I began spending 80% of my time developing and cultivating my employees and 20% of the time working on myself. Contentment comes when you are well-satisfied with the work you’ve done and the legacy left behind.

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