38 episodes

This podcast is an audio repository of Florence Ashley‘s scholarly writing on trans law, bioethics, and more!

The sky is trans, why wouldn’t I be Florence Ashley

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

This podcast is an audio repository of Florence Ashley‘s scholarly writing on trans law, bioethics, and more!

    Beyond the trans/cis binary: introducing new terms will enrich gender research

    Beyond the trans/cis binary: introducing new terms will enrich gender research

    F Ashley, S Brightly-Brown, GN Rider,. Beyond the trans/cis binary: Introducing new terms will enrich gender research. Nature, 630, 293–95



    Abstract: Human experiences are inevitably richer than the categories we carve out for them. But finding the right concepts and language to describe their diversity is an essential part of the scientific endeavour. The term ‘gender modality’ could enable researchers to broaden their horizons. Gender modality refers to how a person’s gender identity relates to the gender they were assigned at birth. Scientists should expand the gamut of gender modalities included in questionnaires given to participants, to capture a broader range of experiences. Researchers can also use gender modality to refine how they phrase questions or discuss results. Lastly, researchers can use gender modality to think more meticulously about what it is that they are really trying to capture in their study. Researching gender should begin with critically engaging with current language and concepts. Thoughtfulness, flexibility, curiosity and empathy are what science needs.



    Link to paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-024-01719-9

    • 10 min
    Reflecting on the rhetoric of adoption in trans youth care

    Reflecting on the rhetoric of adoption in trans youth care

    Florence Ashley, “Reflecting on the Rhetoric of Adoption in
    Trans Youth Care” (2023) 2 Bulletin of Applied Transgender Studies 249–75

     

    Abstract: Adoption is increasingly being discussed as an alternative to procreation for trans youth given the impact of gender-affirming medical care on fertility. In this article, I caution against idyllic views of adoption and offer a critical perspective on the social, political, and ethical dimensions of adoption. After reviewing adoption’s relationship to sexism, racism, imperialism, and cisheteronormativity, I sketch an alternative view of adoption as a com­plex and multi-valenced form of care in an unjust world.


    (Link)

    • 49 min
    Do gender assessments prevent regret in transgender healthcare? A narrative review

    Do gender assessments prevent regret in transgender healthcare? A narrative review

    Florence Ashley, Neeki Parsa, til kus, & Kinnon R MacKinnon, “Do gender assessments prevent regret in transgender
    healthcare? A narrative review” (2023) Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity



    Abstract: Gender assessments are traditionally required before accessing gender-affirming interventions such as hormone therapy and transition-related surgeries. Gender assessments are presented as a way of preventing regret experienced by some people who reidentify with the gender they were assigned at birth after medically transitioning. This article reviews the theoretical and empirical foundations of commonly used methods and predictors for assessing trans patients’ gender identity and/or dysphoria as a condition of eligibility for gender-affirming interventions. We find that the DSM-5 diagnosis, taking gender history, standardized questionnaires, and regret correlates rely on stereotyping, arbitrary, and unproven considerations and, as a result, do not offer reliable ways of predicting future regret over-and-above self-reported gender identity and embodiment goals. This finding is corroborated by empirical data suggesting that individuals who circumvent gender assessments or pursue care under an informed consent model do not present heightened rates of regret. The article concludes that there is no evidence that gender assessments can reliably predict or prevent regret better than self-reported gender identity and embodiment goals. This conclusion provides additional support for informed consent models of care, which deemphasize gender assessments in favor of supporting patient decision making.



    Link: https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2024-16010-001.html

    • 38 min
    The Saint of Christopher Street

    The Saint of Christopher Street

    Florence Ashley & Sam Sanchinel, “The Saint of Christopher Street: Marsha P. Johnson and the Social Life of a Heroine” (2023) 134 Feminist Review 39–55

    Abstract: This article analyses the legacy of Marsha P. Johnson as a heroine through the notion of labour, emphasising how heroine narratives are both a product of labour as well as a form of labour. After offering a short account of Marsha P. Johnson’s role in the Stonewall riots and STAR, we explore the development of trans communities’ ability to create, sustain and disseminate heroine narratives, emphasising Tourmaline’s pivotal archival role in establishing Johnson’s legacy. Then, we elucidate the role of heroine narratives in creating and sustaining a collective identity. We argue that community attachment to Marsha P. Johnson reclaims the place of trans communities in LGBTQ+ history but is often done in a manner that obscures the whiteness of mainstream trans advocacy. We suggest that the recent increase in interest towards the life-sustaining labour of STAR House reflects the evolution of trans collective identity in the post-visibility era.

    (⁠Link to article⁠)

    • 40 min
    What is it like to have a gender identity?

    What is it like to have a gender identity?

    Florence Ashley, “What Is It like to Have a Gender Identity?” (2023) MIND

    Abstract: By attending to how people speak about their gender, we can find diverse answers to the question of what it is like to have a gender identity. To some, it is little more than having a body whereas others may report it as more attitudinal or dispositional—seemingly contradictory views. In this paper, I seek to reconcile these disparate answers by developing a theory of how individual gender identity comes about. In the simplest possible terms, I propose that gender identity is how we make sense of our gender subjectivity, the totality of our gendered experiences of ourselves. Gender identity is constituted by gender subjectivity, but this constitutive relationship is underdetermined. While gender subjectivity may narrow the range of inhabitable gender identities, it is always compatible with more than one. To arrive at a gender identity, we arrange gender subjectivity like building materials. My theory helps us understand how different people offer seemingly incompatible accounts of their gender identity without questioning their authenticity or validity. They simply arrange similar building materials differently.

    (⁠⁠Link to paper⁠⁠)

    • 42 min
    Randomized-controlled trials are methodologically inappropriate in adolescent transgender healthcare

    Randomized-controlled trials are methodologically inappropriate in adolescent transgender healthcare

    Florence Ashley, Diana M. Tordoff, Johanna Olson-Kennedy, & Arjee J. Restar, “Randomized-controlled trials are methodologically inappropriate in adolescent transgender healthcare” (2023) International Journal of Transgender Health

    Abstract: Despite multiple rigorous observational studies documenting the association between positive mental health outcomes and access to puberty blockers, hormone therapy, and transition-related surgeries among adolescents, some jurisdictions have banned or are attempting to ban gender-affirming medical interventions for minors due to an absence of randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) proving their mental health benefits. This article critically reviews whether RCTs are methodologically appropriate for studying the association between adolescent gender-affirming care and mental health outcomes. The scientific value of RCTs is severely impeded when studying the impact of gender-affirming care on the mental health of trans adolescent. Gender-affirming interventions have physiologically evident effects and are highly desired by participants, giving rise to concerns over adherence, drop-out, response bias, and generalizability. Complementary and well-designed observational studies can instead be used to ground reliable recommendations for clinical practice and policymaking in adolescent trans healthcare, without the need for RCTs. The lack of RCTs on the mental health impacts of gender-affirming care for trans adolescents does not entail that gender-affirming interventions are based on insufficient evidence. Given the methodological limitations of RCTs, complementary and well-designed observational studies offer more reliable scientific evidence than RCTs and should be considered of sufficient quality to guide clinical practice and policymaking.

    (Link to article)

    • 26 min

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