45 episodes

The TCC Connection podcast is part of the student-run newspaper at Tulsa Community College. A variety of series and segments are available from staff segments, Connection Conversations, to our Podcast for a Day program.

The TCC Connection The TCC Connection

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

The TCC Connection podcast is part of the student-run newspaper at Tulsa Community College. A variety of series and segments are available from staff segments, Connection Conversations, to our Podcast for a Day program.

    Connection Conversations: Hospitality with Andrew Leonard

    Connection Conversations: Hospitality with Andrew Leonard

    Connection Conversations: Hospitality with Andrew Leonard


    Overview: Host Anna Fuhrmeister interviews Andrew "Andy" Leonard over the affects and changes in the hospitality industry due to COVID-19 the past year and for upcoming travel seasons.


     


    Running time: 7:02 minutes


     


    EDITOR'S NOTE: The following transcript has been edited for clarity.


     


    Anna Fuhrmeister:


    Welcome to the TCC Connection. I'm your host, Anna Fuhrmeister. On this episode, I have a special guest, Andy Leonard, who recently graduated from Lynn University with a bachelor's degree in hospitality. On this episode, we will discuss how hospitality has [been] affected by COVID-19 as well as [the] individuals who work in the industry. So, Andy, welcome. Thank you for having me. So, Andy, how did you get involved in hospitality?


     


    Andy Leonard:


    So, it started when I was a lot younger, I used to watch all the cooking shows House Kitchen, Kitchen Nightmares, and I watched hotel impossible all those shows, it started getting on the track of hospitality, as well as going to hotels experiencing what they offer to the guests and making them feel comfortable. It's how I got started in the field.


     


    Nice. Okay, it's pretty cool. And could you just like describe what the industry like was like prior to 2020?


    So, the industry prior to 2020, we have to look back after 9/11, we have to take back how the travel industry and hospitality industry has changed as focus more on security and tightening up personnel and making sure all the guests feel comfortable while traveling. And having them feel like they have a sense of security, or more hotels or heightened security and security guards, putting more protection in line with them, so that they feel comfortable while arriving. And as much as technology has changed as well, we've been able to use Apple Pay chips and credit cards now so people can pay easier and quicker. So, it's been a more effective system over the coming years. 


     


    That's pretty interesting. Are you still able to work in the hospitality industry during the pandemic?


    Yes, I'm still working in the hospitality industry as a guest service agent right now at a hotel in Delaware. Now to the people who are looking to get into the hospitality industry at the moment during this whole pandemic: I say keep reaching out to the hotels, and they're always looking for people to hire, no matter what they're looking for people to work during Christmas break, even though [in] the slow season, they're always looking for people to hire. I think it's a great industry. It's growing. It's one of the brilliant industries in America, it could be used basically anywhere in the world. So, I think it's a great way to build up connections and a great way to build up people meet new people explore how they see the world and how they see the culture of the hotel and get to know the coworkers, get to know your house keepers, get to know your general manager, because those are going to help the foundation of networks to build [and] to get you into a longer career in the field.


     


    What are some of the changes made at your workplace in order to adjust?


    So, I’m at a fairly small hotel, it's about 72 rooms. So, what we have to adjust is how we do our housekeeping pretty much we don't do stay-over cleaning anymore, where they go in and change your bedding and all that we decided to do a refresher which is basically make your bed, redo your bathroom and take out the trash. That's pretty much it. We have cut out our breakfast, but we have done it to be breakfast to go bags. And all employees are required to wear masks throughout the entire time and washing your hands. And we have provided - we're making the coffee behind the front desk as just for cross contamination issues, just to be safe with gloves as always to be protective. We have hand sanitizers throughout the whole property to make sure that everyone keeps their hands nice and clean and sanitize

    • 7 min
    Connection Conversations - COVID Care Force - Dr. Paul Fuhrmeister

    Connection Conversations - COVID Care Force - Dr. Paul Fuhrmeister

    Connection Conversations: COVID Care Force


    Date Recorded: 12/15/2020


    Overview: Host Sam Levrault interviews Dr. Paul Fuhrmeister over his experience volunteering with the COVID Care Force and the Navajo Nation.


    Running time: 18:12 minutes


     


    The following transcript has been edited for clarity.


    Sam Levrault


    Welcome to the TCC connection. I'm Sam Levrault. I'm the managing editor here at the TCC connection. On this episode, we have special guests, Dr. Paul Fuhrmeister, thank you for joining me today. And on this episode, we'll be talking about your experience as a medical doctor who volunteered on Navajo Nation a couple of times now in New Mexico during the covid 19 pandemic. And so why don't we start up with just kind of brief ideas, a little bit background, about your experiences, doctor and your time there on the Navajo Nation.


     


    Dr. Paul Fuhrmeister


    All right, I normally do urgent care clinic here. So that's the kind of work I do. As it turned out in the spring, we were seeing very few patients here. So, our workload had was very light, but they were very, very heavy out of New Mexico in the Navajo area. So they were asking for volunteers, this organization, the COVID Care Force put out a call for volunteers. So, I answered that, and went out there for two weeks in May and two weeks in June, out to the Navajo reservation, I used to work out on the Indian Reservation before I moved to Oklahoma. So, I was familiar with that area. They were asking just for doctors and nurses to help out in all different places. They had extra work out there in the reservation, partly because they had a lot of sick people with the COVID.


     


    At the same time, some of their staff was getting burnt out or sick and not able to work. So, they had this strange situation where they had a lot of extra work, but then fewer and fewer people to do it. And that's why they needed some volunteers to come and help out. Plus, they had to set up a whole new clinic to do the COVID testing and things like that. In the follow ups, the contact tracing, there was just a lot of extra work. And so, they were very happy to have us come as volunteers.


     


    I went there with a team in May and worked at Shiprock Indian Hospital in Shiprock, New Mexico, and worked mostly outdoors doing the COVID testing in the parking lot of sick people for two weeks. Then in June, I went back out I went to Gallup New Mexico and worked at Rehoboth McKinley Christian Hospital, where they were also doing COVID testing in the parking lot. And I did a lot of interviewing of the patients by phone, people who were coming to be tested.


     


    So, on the phone, was it just kind of going over the symptom checklist before they get there?


     


     


    I asked them what their symptoms were, we asked them if they had been exposed. We asked them if they'd been around anybody that had a positive test, or if they had any deaths in their family or hospitalizations. And then we arranged for the test. And then we also gave them some recommendations and advice about how to keep well and whether or not depending on their symptoms, whether or not they should quarantine, whether they should wear masks all the time just reminding with some of those things and telling them when to expect the results of the tests and what to do if it was going to be positive or negative. So, there was a lot of information for us to give them as well.


     


    And sounds like reassurance to not just the information but the reassurance of here's the next step. Because not everybody knows what to do while you're waiting for that result.


     


    We had a script to tell them because a lot of people really didn't, you're right. They just did not know what they were going to do if it was positive. So, we just outline the steps to them and told them somebody would call them. And if, when they might need to get tested again, and so on.


     


    For the COVID care force, How did you hear about it and how did you join

    • 18 min
    Connection Conversations -A Study Abroad to Japan - Trent Gleason

    Connection Conversations -A Study Abroad to Japan - Trent Gleason

    Connection Conversations: A Study Abroad to Japan


    Date Recorded: 10/28/2020


    Overview: Host Anna Fuhrmeister interviews Trent Gleason as he elaborates on his experience as a global student to Japan and what life lessons he brought back.


    Running time: 29:46 minutes


     


    Transcript from Interview:


     


    Anna Fuhrmeister 0:00


     


    Welcome to the TCC Connection. I'm your host, Anna Fuhrmeister. On this episode, I have a special guest, Trent Gleason. So, Trent, welcome to the podcast. Happy to be here. So, on this episode, we will discuss your study abroad trip to Japan along his interest in Japanese culture, talking about his experience along with touching different elements of Japanese culture. So, Trent, what drew you to Japanese culture?


     


     


    Trent Gleason 0:31


     


    It's a very good question. So, while I was studying at Tulsa Community College, I was mainly focusing on English studies, you know, creative writing, literature, composition, the such, but I needed to take an elective class. And as you know, you know, language studies are a commonly chosen elective. And, you know, among the options available, I thought, hey, Japanese seems interesting. You know, I'll admit, there was some nerdy interest there, like, I like video games a lot. And a lot of great games come out of Japan, I had watched some anime and I was like, hey, yeah, but, uh, but between all the options, Japanese seemed like the most fun. And I had a buddy, who was interested in doing it with me. So I was like, hey, this could be a fun little thing, you know, whatever. So I take it and I ended up like, taking it really seriously. And like passing the class with an A, and like, really walking away from that, like semester, in like, Hey, this is like an actual thing that I like, maybe want to do, like, long term. So from there, you know, my interest is continued to develop naturally, whether that be me, you know, watching more anime or even just, like doing more research, and having conversations with my teacher or like seeking out community events, like one thing I did was that the circle cinema hosted like a documentary night, where is like some Tulsa filmmakers had made a like, documentary about Japanese musicians. I can't remember if it was like there in Oklahoma or something. It was some deal. And so I went out of my way to go to that. And like, my Japanese teacher was there like, unexpectedly and there's this whole thing, and I was just like, okay, but anyway, so like, around that time, like, I realized that Hey, no, with me, looking at finishing my associate's degree here in the next year or so at TCC. Anyway, so, uh, yeah, like, I saw a window of opportunity for me to go to Japan, with me, looking at finishing my associate's degree within the next year or so. So I was like, hey, yeah, I'll start saving money. I'll, you know, start doing research about what kind of stuff I don't want to do on there, where I want to go. And all of it is kind of fell into place. And kind of what I was looking at that trip as like, it was an experiment, right? It was like, Okay, if I spend three months in Japan, and I study abroad, and I really like challenge myself, it'll like inform me of whether or not this is something I actually want to do. Or if it's just like, a fleet of fancy if it's just like, I'm still in the honeymoon phase. And it's not something I actually want to go through. You know, I figured, hey, three months is enough time for me to really get a taste of like the true challenge of studying Japanese and also like whether or not I even really want to know if whether or not I'm really seriously interested in this country. It just kind of felt like a natural next step. If I were to take this seriously, and I did it, and I had the experiences I had, and I'm sure you'll ask me more questions. But that so


     


     


     


    Anna Fuhrmeister 3:32


     


    So what programs did you associate with to go on this study abroad trip to Japan?


     


     

    • 29 min
    Connection Conversations - Rhoda Smietanski - ASL Interpreting

    Connection Conversations - Rhoda Smietanski - ASL Interpreting

    Podcast Director Sam Levrault talks with Rhoda Smietanski about her experiences with American Sign Language (ASL,) the ASLE and Interpreting Programs, and opportunities available to students through Tulsa Community College (TCC) and in our very community.


    Connection Conversations is an ongoing series by the TCC Connection, TCC's student newspaper based at Tulsa Community College in Tulsa, Oklahoma.


     


    NOTE: The episode was originally recorded in FALL 2019.


    Music by The Odyssey, "75 to Ramona" 


     


    Episode edited by Sam Levrault 


    Check out The TCC Connection online at http://tccconnection.com/


    The TCC Connection is a student newspaper based at Tulsa Community College in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    • 20 min
    Connection Conversations - with Dr. Kendra Reynolds - Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence

    Connection Conversations - with Dr. Kendra Reynolds - Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence

    Podcast Director Sam Levrault talks with TCC's Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence, Dr. Kendra Reynolds. Dr. Reynolds is visiting from Northern Ireland and will teach a Composition II course in Spring 2020.


    To learn more about the Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence Program, visit https://www.cies.org/program/fulbright-scholar-residence-program. 


    You can follow Dr. Reynolds on Facebook, as @KendraReynoldsWriter, and Twitter, at @Dr_K_Reynolds.


    Connection Conversations is an ongoing series by the TCC Connection, TCC's student newspaper based at Tulsa Community College in Tulsa, Oklahoma.


     


    Episode edited by Sam Levrault 


    Check out The TCC Connection online at http://tccconnection.com/


    The TCC Connection is a student newspaper based at Tulsa Community College in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    • 23 min
    Connection Conversations - Pam Chew - Associate Professor of Italian

    Connection Conversations - Pam Chew - Associate Professor of Italian

    Podcast Director Sam Levrault talks with Associate Professor of Italian, Pamela Chew about her experiences abroad, the World Languages Program, specifically the Italian courses and opportunities available to Tulsa Community College.


    Connection Conversations is an ongoing series by the TCC Connection, TCC's student newspaper based at Tulsa Community College in Tulsa, Oklahoma.


    Music by The Odyssey, "75 to Ramona" 


     


    Episode edited by Sam Levrault 


    Check out The TCC Connection online at http://tccconnection.com/


    The TCC Connection is a student newspaper based at Tulsa Community College in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Apple TV+ / AT WILL MEDIA
Pushkin Industries
Wondery
C13Originals
iHeartPodcasts
Glennon Doyle & Cadence13