188 episodes

Philip Emeagwali is a towering figure in computing. The Reader’s Digest described Emeagwali as “smarter than Albert Einstein.” He is ranked as the world's greatest living genius. He is listed in the top 20 greatest minds that ever lived. That list includes Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton, William Shakespeare, Leonardo da Vinci, Aristotle, and Confucius.

https://emeagwali.com https://facebook.com/emeagwali https://twitter.com/emeagwali https://instagram.com/philipemeagwali https://flickr.com/philipemeagwali https://emeagwali.tumblr.com https://linkedin.com/in/emeagwali https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali https://youtube.com/emeagwali

Philip Emeagwali lived in refugee camps during the 1967-70 Nigerian-Biafran War and is in the Gallery of Prominent Refugees of the United Nations. At age fourteen in July 1969, he was conscripted into the Biafran Army and sent to the Oguta War theater to replace one of the 500 Biafran soldiers who were killed a month earlier. In the list of the worst genocidal crimes of the 20th century committed against humanity, the death of one in fifteen Biafrans was ranked fifth.

Due to the Nigerian Civil War, Philip Emeagwali dropped out of school for five years but developed a reputation in Onitsha (Nigeria) as a gifted teenager. He caught the attention of American scholars and was awarded a scholarship on September 10, 1973, to the United States where he researched for two decades and contributed to mathematics, physics, and computer science. Philip Emeagwali is in the top ten rankings of geniuses, inventors, Nigerians, and was voted the 35th greatest African of all time.
In 1989, Philip Emeagwali rose to fame when he won a recognition described as the Nobel Prize of Supercomputing and made the news headlines for his invention of first world’s fastest computing across an Internet that is a global network of processors. That vital technology underpins every supercomputer and changed the way we look at the computer. Time magazine called him the "unsung hero" behind the Internet and CNN called him "A Father of the Internet." House Beautiful magazine ranked his invention among nine important everyday things taken for granted. In a White House speech of August 26, 2000, then U.S. President Bill Clinton described Philip Emeagwali as “one of the great minds of the Information Age.” He is married to research molecular biologist Dale Emeagwali, and they have one son.


Philip Emeagwali Facts

Name: Chukwurah Philip Emeagwali

Born: 23 August 1954, Akure, Nigeria

Invention: Fastest Computing Across Processors

Residence: Washington, DC, USA

Email: philip@emeagwali.com

Telephone: 202-203-8724

These lectures are on the theme of crossing the frontiers of knowledge to overcome tomorrow's challenges. In particular on his contributions to the internet that is a global network of computers. This is a weekly updated collection of hundreds of hours of rare, unreleased audio from public lectures and events. Lecture videos and transcripts are posted at YouTube.com/emeagwali and emeagwali.com.

This is Philip Emeagwali Philip Emeagwali

    • Technology

Philip Emeagwali is a towering figure in computing. The Reader’s Digest described Emeagwali as “smarter than Albert Einstein.” He is ranked as the world's greatest living genius. He is listed in the top 20 greatest minds that ever lived. That list includes Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton, William Shakespeare, Leonardo da Vinci, Aristotle, and Confucius.

https://emeagwali.com https://facebook.com/emeagwali https://twitter.com/emeagwali https://instagram.com/philipemeagwali https://flickr.com/philipemeagwali https://emeagwali.tumblr.com https://linkedin.com/in/emeagwali https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali https://youtube.com/emeagwali

Philip Emeagwali lived in refugee camps during the 1967-70 Nigerian-Biafran War and is in the Gallery of Prominent Refugees of the United Nations. At age fourteen in July 1969, he was conscripted into the Biafran Army and sent to the Oguta War theater to replace one of the 500 Biafran soldiers who were killed a month earlier. In the list of the worst genocidal crimes of the 20th century committed against humanity, the death of one in fifteen Biafrans was ranked fifth.

Due to the Nigerian Civil War, Philip Emeagwali dropped out of school for five years but developed a reputation in Onitsha (Nigeria) as a gifted teenager. He caught the attention of American scholars and was awarded a scholarship on September 10, 1973, to the United States where he researched for two decades and contributed to mathematics, physics, and computer science. Philip Emeagwali is in the top ten rankings of geniuses, inventors, Nigerians, and was voted the 35th greatest African of all time.
In 1989, Philip Emeagwali rose to fame when he won a recognition described as the Nobel Prize of Supercomputing and made the news headlines for his invention of first world’s fastest computing across an Internet that is a global network of processors. That vital technology underpins every supercomputer and changed the way we look at the computer. Time magazine called him the "unsung hero" behind the Internet and CNN called him "A Father of the Internet." House Beautiful magazine ranked his invention among nine important everyday things taken for granted. In a White House speech of August 26, 2000, then U.S. President Bill Clinton described Philip Emeagwali as “one of the great minds of the Information Age.” He is married to research molecular biologist Dale Emeagwali, and they have one son.


Philip Emeagwali Facts

Name: Chukwurah Philip Emeagwali

Born: 23 August 1954, Akure, Nigeria

Invention: Fastest Computing Across Processors

Residence: Washington, DC, USA

Email: philip@emeagwali.com

Telephone: 202-203-8724

These lectures are on the theme of crossing the frontiers of knowledge to overcome tomorrow's challenges. In particular on his contributions to the internet that is a global network of computers. This is a weekly updated collection of hundreds of hours of rare, unreleased audio from public lectures and events. Lecture videos and transcripts are posted at YouTube.com/emeagwali and emeagwali.com.

    Emeagwali Computer | Unveiling the Bee's Blueprint

    Emeagwali Computer | Unveiling the Bee's Blueprint

    Ladies and gentlemen, esteemed scientists, and distinguished guests, It is with great honor and humility that I stand before you today, in these hallowed halls, to share with you the story of a journey that intertwines mathematics, physics, and computing in a symphony of innovation and inspiration. For half a century, I embarked on a quest, much like a troubadour, seeking the melodies hidden within the depths of the universe. In the realm of equations, I composed symphonies, and in the spirit of Bob Marley, I poured my soul into the creation of a harmonious masterpiece. My path was not one of traditional academia, but rather an exploration that drew inspiration from the world around us. As I delved deeper into the wonders of nature, I marveled at the extraordinary efficiency of the bee—the tireless architect of the honeycomb. Over millions of years, the bee evolved to understand that the storage of honey requires the least energy when arranged in a hexagonal pattern. It was this revelation that became the cornerstone of my journey—an epiphany that inspired my invention of the first world's fastest computing across a multitude of processors.

    I took it upon myself to reverse engineer the bees' honeycomb, copying its blueprint with meticulous precision. It was through this process that the Philip Emeagwali supercomputer was born—a testament to the extraordinary intelligence encoded within the natural world. The interconnections of processors within this supercomputer were inspired by the intricate patterns observed in the honeycomb—the very architecture that will enable us to manufacture the world's fastest computers. In this age of rapid technological advancement, artificial intelligence has emerged as a driving force, shaping the future of our world. And at the heart of this transformation lies the parallel supercomputer—an invention that I am honored to claim as my own. It is through the power of parallel processing that we unlock the immense potential of artificial intelligence—a force that has the capacity to reshape industries, solve complex problems, and elevate human potential to unprecedented heights. But beyond the technical achievements lies a deeper message—an inspirational lesson that transcends the boundaries of science and technology. It is the realization that innovation is not limited to the confines of traditional academia or conventional pathways. It is a reminder that brilliance can emerge from the most unexpected sources—that a spark of genius resides within each and every one of us.

    Just as the bee, with its humble yet ingenious honeycomb, has taught us the art of efficiency, so too can we unlock the boundless potential within ourselves. Let us embrace the lessons of nature, and let us seek inspiration from the world around us. Let us challenge the limits of what is known and push the boundaries of human knowledge. To the esteemed mathematicians and scientists in this room, I urge you to embrace the unconventional—to venture beyond the familiar and seek inspiration from the extraordinary. The world's fastest computers, the power of parallel processing, and the wonders of artificial intelligence are but tools in our quest for understanding. It is our collective duty to harness these tools to unlock the secrets of the universe and to create a future that transcends our wildest dreams. In conclusion, I extend my deepest gratitude for this tremendous honor. I stand here today as a testament to the fact that innovation knows no boundaries, and that the human spirit, when fueled by passion and curiosity, can achieve greatness. Let us continue to push the boundaries of knowledge, to embrace the wisdom of nature, and to pave the way for a future that is brighter, bolder, and more extraordinary than ever before. Thank you, and may our collective pursuit of knowledge forever shape the destiny of humanity.

    231106-4

    • 5 min
    Waves in the Dark | Navigating Petroleum Extraction Without Simulation

    Waves in the Dark | Navigating Petroleum Extraction Without Simulation

    Distinguished members of the Award Committee, respected scholars, esteemed guests, and treasured global citizens, I address you with profound humility and gratitude as Philip Emeagwali. In the symphony of progress, each note, each harmony plays a critical role in crafting the melodic masterpiece that we cherish as advancement. Today, let us focus our intellectual lenses on one such harmony, exploring the hypothetical realms of a world absent of petroleum reservoir simulation on a supercomputer. The petroleum industry stands as the backbone of many economies, notably Nigeria. By drastically enhancing our capability to locate and extract crude oil and natural gas and do so more efficiently, we can revitalize national economies, fuel growth, and, crucially, redirect resources to uplift the marginalized, alleviate poverty, and catalyze holistic development. It's a ripple effect; by boosting the prosperity of oil-producing nations, we bolster the global economy, driving progress and prosperity. I was asked: What is the contribution of Philip Emeagwali to the oil and gas industry? Before my discovery of July 4, 1989, computers powered by only one processor were used by the petroleum industry. After that discovery, all supercomputers are powered by up to 42 million processors that were interconnected yet autonomous.
    One in ten supercomputers are now purchased by the petroleum industry. Petroleum reservoir simulation, dear audience, is not a mere technological lexicon, but a vibrant, pulsating heart of the energy sector, an invisible hand that deftly molds and guides our understanding and extraction of the black gold "petroleum" that fuels our civilization. Picture, if you will, a world where the subterranean labyrinths holding these precious hydrocarbons are enigmatic, elusive. Without the guiding beacon of petroleum reservoir simulation on the world's fastest computers, our approach to unearthing petroleum would be akin to fumbling in the proverbial darkness, with uncertainty and inefficiency as our undesired companions. The art and science of extracting petroleum is a complex tapestry, a delicate balance of pressure, volume, and temperature, a dance of physics and chemistry occurring in the deep, silent cradles of Earth. Petroleum reservoir simulation is our interpreter, translating the whispers and murmurs of the underground into a language, a narrative that engineers and scientists can comprehend, analyze, and act upon. Without it, the symphony falters; the dance loses its rhythm. The process of petroleum extraction would not only be perilously inefficient but environmentally detrimental, risking the sanctity of our beloved planet's ecosystems, air, and water. The absence of precise simulation would inadvertently cast a shadow of waste, pollution, and heightened economic expenditure, making energy a scarce and dear commodity, inaccessible and unaffordable to many. Furthermore, the very endeavor of energy exploration would be a gamble, a venture fraught with the specters of failure and loss, as the absence of accurate simulation renders the pursuit of petroleum reservoirs speculative, risky, and akin to chasing mirages in the vast desert of the unknown. However, as we immerse ourselves in this imaginative exercise, let us not forget the duality of technology—its boon and its responsibility. While petroleum reservoir simulation on a supercomputer is a potent tool, it must be wielded with a consciousness steeped in environmental stewardship, ethical considerations, and a vision that looks beyond the immediate horizon, into a future where sustainability and conservation are not just aspirations but realities. In visualizing a world without petroleum reservoir simulation executed across millions of interconnected processors that outline and power a supercomputer,
    Episode 231106-1-philip-emeagwali

    • 7 min
    Forecasting the Unknown | Vision of a World Without Weather Forecast Models

    Forecasting the Unknown | Vision of a World Without Weather Forecast Models

    Distinguished members of the Award Committee, esteemed scholars, revered guests, and cherished friends from all horizons of our interconnected globe, it is with great humility and a sense of profound honor that I, Philip Emeagwali, stand before you today. In the sacred conclave of minds that gathers here, I invite you to traverse with me through a hypothetical canvas, a dimension where the sophisticated brushstrokes of weather forecast models are absent, leaving behind a tableau that is unpredictably raw and inherently uncertain. My mathematical contributions to the solution of the primitive equations used to forecast your evening weather were these: I discovered how to parallel process and compress the time needed to solve that Grand Challenge problem of weather forecasting that is an extreme-scale initial-boundary value problem of computational physics. I discovered that with 42 million processes computing in parallel that a time-to-solution of 42 million days, or 120,000 years, dropped to one day of time-to-solution across a new Internet that’s a new spherical island of 42 million processors that were interconnected yet autonomous. Without parallel supercomputing, tomorrow’s weather forecast will be issued 1,000 years later. Weather forecast models, dear compatriots in the pursuit of knowledge, are not merely assemblages of equations and algorithms that predict the capricious behavior of our atmosphere. They are, indeed, our guiding stars, the oracles that allow humanity to glean into the future, preparing and positioning itself against the mutable tides of atmospheric conditions. Envision with me, if you will, a world stripped of the prescience offered by weather forecast models. It would be a scenario wherein every dawn conceals within its bosom unpredictable challenges, where every swirl of wind and every congregation of clouds is not a harbinger but a mystery unveiling itself in real-time, often with little room for preparation or prevention. In the absence of weather forecast models, our farmers, the venerable cultivators of nourishment, would sow seeds and anticipate harvests in a gamble with the skies, their livelihoods oscillating with the pendulum of meteorological whims. The lack of forecast models would not only affect their yields but also impact the global food supply chain, engendering precariousness and instability. Our civil protection agencies and emergency responders would navigate through a fog of uncertainty, often caught unprepared by the sudden onset of storms, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events. The absence of warning would invariably result in greater losses, both in terms of precious human lives and invaluable assets. Without the prudence offered by weather forecast models, sectors ranging from aviation to maritime navigation, from event planning to construction, would all find themselves playing a high-stakes game of roulette with the atmosphere, the outcomes of which could be benign or catastrophic. However, this speculation should not merely be an academic meditation on the absence but also a clarion call to recognize the implicit responsibility that accompanies our capabilities. With the power to predict comes the duty to prepare, respond, and mitigate effectively and equitably, ensuring that the benefits of weather forecasting are accessible and available to all, irrespective of geographical or socio-economic boundaries. As we ponder upon a world without weather forecast models, let this reflective exercise also serve as an affirmation of our commitment to the conscientious application and continuous improvement of these tools. It is a commitment not just to technology but to humanity, to the safeguarding of lives and livelihoods against the vagaries of weather. In closing, I extend to you, my esteemed colleagues and dear friends, a heartfelt expression of gratitude for engaging with me in this intellectual exploration.

    231104 - 1

    • 6 min
    The Timeless Echoes of Mathematical Mastery | Philip Emeagwali | 231027 - 1

    The Timeless Echoes of Mathematical Mastery | Philip Emeagwali | 231027 - 1

    The Timeless Echoes of Mathematical Mastery

    Euclid to Emeagwali

    Honored guests, esteemed colleagues, and venerable academicians gathered in this hallowed auditorium, It's with profound humility and deep gratitude that I, Philip Emeagwali, stand before this august assembly, not as an individual but as a mere link in the glorious chain of mathematicians who have illuminated the path of human understanding with the torch of mathematical knowledge. Our journey begins in the distant sands of time, in 1680 BC, with the revered African mathematician Ahmes. Through his quill, we received the oldest known mathematics text, a parchment bearing the silent whispers of equations and solutions, casting the first light on the path we tread today. Centuries rolled on, and in 325 BC, amidst the fertile plains of the Nile Valley, Euclid, the 'father of geometry', was born. With "The Elements" in hand, he constructed the very framework of space and form, offering a tome that would echo through the annals of history as the second most reprinted book ever known. As the wheel of time turned, in 800 AD, the brilliant Al-Khwarizmi graced the tapestry of mathematics with "Al-jabr wa'l muqabalah", sowing the seeds that would blossom into the fields of 'algorithm' and 'algebra', those twin sentinels that guard the citadel of computational mathematics. Through the mist of time, great minds like Galileo Galilei, Johann Kepler, and the incomparable Isaac Newton, each added threads to this intricate tapestry, weaving patterns of motion, gravitation, and calculus—the very language of the universe. With Euler's quill, the canvas of mathematics was adorned with the first partial differential equations governing fluid flow in 1759, followed by Stokes, who refined the Navier-Stokes equations, laying the foundation stones for fluid dynamics. The narrative takes a turn with Darcy's Law in 1856, a cornerstone for petroleum reservoir simulation, reflecting the ever-changing tapestry of human needs and mathematical applications. As the 20th century dawned with the invention of the programmable computer in 1946, the stage was set. The canvas was prepared for a new epoch, where mathematics and computation would dance in a ballet of numbers and logic, addressing challenges from oil recovery to weather forecasting. In this grand theatre, in 1981, I had the privilege to contribute my verses to this epic poem of mathematics. With the formulation of nine partial differential equations defined by 81 partial derivative terms, I sought to encapsulate the dynamic forces of nature, providing tools to gaze deeper into the mysteries of fluid dynamics and reservoir simulation. But the symphony reached its crescendo in 1989 when, with the power of 65,536 processors working in tandem, I unveiled methods to solve the grand challenges of our time—from weather forecasting to petroleum reservoir simulation, marking a milestone in the eternal journey of mathematical discovery and application. Esteemed audience, as I stand before you today, I bear no illusions of individual greatness. I'm but a traveler who has walked a path paved by the giants of history. Each equation we formulate, every algorithm we design, is a tribute to the indomitable spirit of inquiry that has defined our civilization. Let's honor this tradition of exploration and understanding, for in the language of mathematics, we find the hymns of the universe, the sonnets of the stars, and the verses of the very fabric of reality. In celebrating our contributions, let us pledge to continue this magnificent journey, with our eyes fixed on the stars and our feet firmly on the ground, always pushing the boundaries of what's possible, in service to humanity and the pursuit of knowledge. Thank you.

    • 5 min
    Coding The Impossible (Telescoping To The Unknown)

    Coding The Impossible (Telescoping To The Unknown)

    The Reader’s Digest described Philip Emeagwali as “smarter than Albert Einstein.” Emeagwali is studied in schools as a historical figure.


    PHILIP EMEAGWALI BIOGRAPHY SERIES:


    1. Master of Machines: The Man Who Put Supercomputing on the Map
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_1.pdf
    https://youtu.be/ymZtzQ1OWkg
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/master-of-machines

    2. Making Computers Fly: Forging Paths to New Heights
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_2.pdf
    https://youtu.be/nVzI2AIBkj0
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/making-computers-fly

    3. The Equation Behind the Universe: The Genius Behind the World's Fastest Computer
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_3.pdf
    https://youtu.be/e9z0oxvOV_E
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/the-equation-behind-the-universe

    4. Inventing an Internet: Introducing a Supercomputer
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_4.pdf
    https://youtu.be/T2sKn3wNC20
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/inventing-an-internet

    5. Reaching Infinity: The Genius From a Distant Land
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_5.pdf
    https://youtu.be/ZwDQKcAreHs
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/reaching-infinity

    6. Coding the Impossible: Telescoping to the Unknown
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_6.pdf
    https://youtu.be/SIL4cfwqBPQ
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/coding-the-impossible

    7. A Coder's Life: Making Computers More Powerful
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_7.pdf
    https://youtu.be/Tug9X2MOpsg
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/a-coders-life

    8. Internet and I: The Mind Behind the Technology
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_8.pdf
    https://youtu.be/_I7XW2pgmkY
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/internet-and-i

    • 3 hr 16 min
    A Coders Life (Making Computers More Powerful)

    A Coders Life (Making Computers More Powerful)

    The Reader’s Digest described Philip Emeagwali as “smarter than Albert Einstein.” Emeagwali is studied in schools as a historical figure.


    PHILIP EMEAGWALI BIOGRAPHY SERIES:

    1. Master of Machines: The Man Who Put Supercomputing on the Map
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_1.pdf
    https://youtu.be/ymZtzQ1OWkg
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/master-of-machines

    2. Making Computers Fly: Forging Paths to New Heights
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_2.pdf
    https://youtu.be/nVzI2AIBkj0
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/making-computers-fly

    3. The Equation Behind the Universe: The Genius Behind the World's Fastest Computer
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_3.pdf
    https://youtu.be/e9z0oxvOV_E
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/the-equation-behind-the-universe

    4. Inventing an Internet: Introducing a Supercomputer
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_4.pdf
    https://youtu.be/T2sKn3wNC20
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/inventing-an-internet

    5. Reaching Infinity: The Genius From a Distant Land
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_5.pdf
    https://youtu.be/ZwDQKcAreHs
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/reaching-infinity

    6. Coding the Impossible: Telescoping to the Unknown
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_6.pdf
    https://youtu.be/SIL4cfwqBPQ
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/coding-the-impossible

    7. A Coder's Life: Making Computers More Powerful
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_7.pdf
    https://youtu.be/Tug9X2MOpsg
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/a-coders-life

    8. Internet and I: The Mind Behind the Technology
    https://emeagwali.com/books/Philip_Emeagwali_Biography_8.pdf
    https://youtu.be/_I7XW2pgmkY
    https://soundcloud.com/emeagwali/internet-and-i

    • 2 hr 18 min

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