16 episodes

Thought Huddle is a new podcast highlighting thinkers and doers who are devoted to creating meaningful impact. It explores ideas, tells stories, and helps make sense of our complicated and beautiful world.

Thought Huddle podcast Arizona State University

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0, 3 Ratings

Thought Huddle is a new podcast highlighting thinkers and doers who are devoted to creating meaningful impact. It explores ideas, tells stories, and helps make sense of our complicated and beautiful world.

    How America was built on slavery: Those roots can still be felt today

    How America was built on slavery: Those roots can still be felt today

    American capitalism was built on the backs of slaves and the slave economy — and not just in the South. Some of these practices are still with us.

    Historian Calvin Schermerhorn explains how slavery built America without returning virtually any of the gains to the enslaved people — or their descendants. He also describes how racial inequality is part of our national DNA and why it persists.

    Schermerhorn is a professor of history in ASU’s School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies, and the author of four books on the history of slavery in the U.S., including “Unrequited Toil: A History of United States Slavery.”

    • 27 min
    On lynching and racial oppression: How white violence denies black innocence

    On lynching and racial oppression: How white violence denies black innocence

    The practice of lynching was originally used against British loyalists. But after the Civil War it became a way of brutally suppressing the rights and agency of African American citizens.

    We speak with ASU Professor Ersula Ore about her book, "Lynching: Violence, Rhetoric, & American Identity," and the continuing reality of racial injustice.

    Ore traces the ways in which the practice and the language of violence are embedded in American identity, and how that affects citizens — specifically ex-slaves, Native Americans and other people of color.

    Ore is the Lincoln Professor of Ethics in the School of Social Transformation and an assistant professor of African and African American studies, and rhetoric.

    • 25 min
    Crises of their own: How nonprofits are creatively confronting COVID-19

    Crises of their own: How nonprofits are creatively confronting COVID-19

    Organizations serving the public during the crisis of COVID-19 are facing their own challenges.

    Myriad nonprofits — from front-line service providers to museums and performing arts organizations — are feeling the impact of the pandemic in everything from revenues to volunteerism. Robert Ashcraft, executive director of the Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation at ASU, talks about the challenges, creativity and collaboration he’s seeing in nonprofits across the country, including the innovative use of farm animals on Zoom calls.

    • 23 min
    Love Sickness: Shakespeare, medicine and metaphors in a world of plague

    Love Sickness: Shakespeare, medicine and metaphors in a world of plague

    Romantic love was long considered an illness — with some bizarre and harrowing treatments.

    In Shakespeare’s time, the plague and disease are metaphors for love — the overwhelming, intoxicating, love-at-first-sight kind of love. Remedies for this “love sickness” ranged from lettuce to surgery.

    We talk to Ian Moulton, professor of English and cultural history in ASU's College of Integrative Sciences and Arts, who takes us on a journey from ancient Greece through the early modern period, and the literature and medical history of illness and love.

    • 21 min
    The most vulnerable among us: How the pandemic reveals inequities in health care and beyond

    The most vulnerable among us: How the pandemic reveals inequities in health care and beyond

    Poor and minority communities were at a disadvantage before COVID-19, but they are getting hit hardest now. Can the U.S. use this moment for positive change?

    African Americans and Native American communities have been particularly hard hit by COVID-19, as well as people in the lowest income strata — many of whom work jobs that expose them to the virus, and have limited access to our nation’s fragmentary social safety net.

    Swapna Reddy, clinical assistant professor at Arizona State University's College of Health Solutions and adjunct professor in health care administration at Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine-Arizona, describes both problems and potential solutions to the long standing crisis of inequity that this pandemic is highlighting.

    • 19 min
    Testing is Key: Attacking the Virus with Rapid Response, Robots and Reliability

    Testing is Key: Attacking the Virus with Rapid Response, Robots and Reliability

    Reliable and fast testing are needed all over the US to confront the spread of COVID-19. We talk to Dr. Joshua LaBaer about his lab’s robotic systems—and how to use and expand testing most effectively.

    When the Covid-19 pandemic hit, LaBaer, executive director of ASU’s Biodesign Institute, transformed one of his labs into a high-volume coronavirus testing lab. This lab was originally developed to do high-volume testing for radiation in case of nuclear disaster. We talk about how the lab works, how to best do testing and contacting tracing, and how to incorporate both of these into strategic plans to reopen society.

    • 26 min

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