75 episodes

Toasted Sister is radio about Native American food because it came a long way. Traditional indigenous foodways were lost, found, redefined and modernized in the last few hundred years. And here it is today, in the hands of Native chefs and foodies who work to keep their traditional flavors and ingredients alive. I'm Andi Murphy and I'm talking to as many Indigenous foodies as I can.

Toasted Sister Podcast Native Voice One - NV1

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 138 Ratings

Toasted Sister is radio about Native American food because it came a long way. Traditional indigenous foodways were lost, found, redefined and modernized in the last few hundred years. And here it is today, in the hands of Native chefs and foodies who work to keep their traditional flavors and ingredients alive. I'm Andi Murphy and I'm talking to as many Indigenous foodies as I can.

    E72: The Death and Food Episode

    E72: The Death and Food Episode

    This is the death and food episode where I talk with Indigenous death doula, Chrystal Waban, about her work with Blackbird Medicines and the Indigenous Death Doula Collective and how food is connected to this very important journey for those who are dying, for those who are dead and for those they leave behind. Also in this episode are stories about death and food by: Dale Jones (Tulalip), Tipiziwin Tolman (Dakota and Lakota) and Melissa Baehr (Anishinaabe Ojibwe).

    • 46 min
    E71: Indigenous Farmworkers – “Do your work no matter what other people say”

    E71: Indigenous Farmworkers – “Do your work no matter what other people say”

    Do you know who picked the cabbage and celery you find at the grocery store? It might’ve been an Indigenous immigrant farmworker. In this episode, I visit with a couple of Indigenous immigrant farmworkers at Rio Grande Farm Park in Alamosa, Colorado to learn about their journey here and why they left Guatemala. I also speak with Dr. Giovanni Batz, social anthropologist focusing on Maya migration, displacement and diaspora, Guatemalan history, Indigenous movements and human rights, to learn more about why so many people migrate here; and why so many Indigenous people are displaced from their lands in Latin America.

    Dr. Batz mentions Gofundme fundraisers for Hurricane Eta relief:

    "Maya communities need help – Hurricane Eta"

    "Urgent need for Maya people due to Hurricane Eta"

    "Collection for Victims of Eta Hurricane in Nebaj"

    Dr. Batz also suggests “Indigenous Communities on the Frontline as Two Climate Change-Fueled Hurricanes Slam Central America” from “Democracy Now!”

    • 35 min
    E70: The Thanksgiving Episode

    E70: The Thanksgiving Episode

    Thanksgiving is a lie.
    In this episode I talk with three Wampanoag women about Thanksgiving and how colonization effected their foodways. We’ll also talk about the awesome work they’re doing in their East coast communities to educate and revitalize Wampanoag food. Guests are chef Sherry Pocknett from Sly Fox Den Restaurant, Danielle Hill, educator and cultural consultant with Heron-Hill LLC., and Talia Landry, production coordinator for Mashpee TV.

    • 42 min
    E69: Bow & Arrow Brewing Co.: The Book of Names

    E69: Bow & Arrow Brewing Co.: The Book of Names

    There’s nothing like a good beer—for me that’s a cold, citrusy and bitter IPA—and for those who appreciate the brews from their local breweries, beer is more than alcohol. Craft beer is a whole vibe and culture. In this episode, I talk with the founders of Bow & Arrow Brewing Co., Shyla Sheppard (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara) and Missy Begay (Navajo), about starting from scratch, foraging for beer ingredients and their branding and aesthetic.

    • 52 min
    E68: The BLACK Episode

    E68: The BLACK Episode

    My favorite color is black. That also means I have a fascination with black-colored foods. Indigenous foods come in all kinds of colors including black. In this episode, chefs Tawnya Brant (Kanyen'kehá:ka), David Smoke-McCluskey (Mohawk) and Andrea Murdoch (Andean Native) and farmer, Cherilyn Yazzie (Diné) talk about the black foods in their kitchens and farms.
    Mentioned:
    Indigo-Show art show, September 26 + 27

    • 30 min
    E67: Indigenous American + African American food

    E67: Indigenous American + African American food

    This podcast episode is a 20-minute preview of “Indigenous Roots: Exploring the Crossroads of African American and Indigenous American Cuisine,” an online two-part event hosted by the Museum of Food and Drink on Aug. 5 and 6. Guest chefs, Yusuf Bin-Rella of Trade Roots Culinary Collective, Elena Terry (Ho-Chunk), executive chef and founder of Wild Bearies, and chef Dave Smoke-McCluskey (Mohawk), will speak about the ways in which both cuisines have influenced each other in the context of the social reasons that early African American and Native American cultures came together out of necessity. This necessity, in turn, created a beautiful cuisine that is now part of the American food lexicon and continues to evolve.

    Where: Zoom

    When: Talk on Wednesday, Aug. 5 at 8 p.m. Eastern time. Afro-Indigenous virtual food demonstration on Thursday, Aug. 6 at 8 p.m. Eastern time.

    Tickets: $15 general admission for Aug. 5 panel discussion, $40 for the cooking demo on Aug. 6, and $45 for the panel and cooking demo.

    Info: MOFAD.org

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
138 Ratings

138 Ratings

al..green ,

a favorite food podcast

I am so grateful for this series! Andi shares valuable stories from different perspectives in the food system in a thoughtful and engaging way. It’s a great show that deserves your time.

Mariette P ,

If you call yourself a foodie you MUST listen to this podcast

I love this podcast! It’s engaging, charming and smart. A great way to learn about Native foodways in the US and Canada. Food, drink, culture, history, human connection and great storytelling. Just listen.

Abigail Gerber ,

Thank you

Thank you to Andi for providing a platform for us to learn and share!

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To