80 episodes

Trinity Forum Conversations is a podcast exploring the big questions in life by looking to the best of the Christian intellectual tradition and elevating the voices, both ancient and modern, who grapple with these questions and direct our hearts to the Author of the answers. We invite you to join us in one of the great joys of life: a conversation among friends on the things that matter most.

Trinity Forum Conversations The Trinity Forum

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 142 Ratings

Trinity Forum Conversations is a podcast exploring the big questions in life by looking to the best of the Christian intellectual tradition and elevating the voices, both ancient and modern, who grapple with these questions and direct our hearts to the Author of the answers. We invite you to join us in one of the great joys of life: a conversation among friends on the things that matter most.

    The Kingdom, The Power, and The Glory with Tim Alberta

    The Kingdom, The Power, and The Glory with Tim Alberta

    The Kingdom, The Power, and The Glory with Tim Alberta

    American Christians are certainly not immune to the anger, division, and fear that characterize our political moment. For many, the prospect of another election year is a source of dread or of numb exhaustion; others have responded with aggression or defensiveness.
    On our podcast, author and journalist Tim Alberta encourages us toward a better media diet, and to remember where our true allegiance lies:
    “I would pray alongside of you that in our political and civic engagement, no matter who it is that we ultimately vote for, no matter what policies we support, that our allegiance is never to the Donkeys or to the Republicans. Our allegiance is never to a political figure.“We have a king, we have a kingdom, and the best way for us to retain our saltiness is to prioritize that allegiance and that allegiance alone.”
    We hope this conversation, coming in a heated election year and at a time of great political import for our nation, is, in fact, a kind of spiritual balm to you. May Tim’s guidance help us to retain our distinctiveness as we engage in the public square for the common good.

    This podcast is an edited version of an online conversation recorded in early 2024. Watch the full video of the conversation here, and learn more about Tim Alberta.

    Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:
    American Carnage, by Tim Alberta
    The Kingdom, the Power and the Glory, American Evangelicals in an Age of Extremism, by Tim Alberta
    Rush Limbaugh
    Robert Jeffress

    Related Trinity Forum Readings:
    Children of Light and The Children of Darkness, by Reinhold Niebuhr
    City of God, by Augustine
    Politics, Morality and Civility, by Václav Havel
    Related Conversations:A New Year With The Word with Malcolm GuiteMusic, Creativity & Justice with Ruth Naomi FloydPursuing Humility with Richard Foster and Brenda QuinnReading as a Spiritual Practice with Jessica Hooten WilsonWalking as a Spiritual Practice with Mark BuchananMaking as a Spiritual Practice with Makoto FujimuraConnecting Spiritual Formation & Public Life with Michael Wear
    To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, join the Trinity Forum Society
    Special thanks to Ned Bustard for our podcast artwork.

    • 42 min
    Connecting Spiritual Formation and Public Life with Michael Wear

    Connecting Spiritual Formation and Public Life with Michael Wear

    Connecting Spiritual Formation and Public Life with Michael Wear

    In the midst of what is proving to be a frustrating, fractious, and even frightening election year, how can Christians best respond to the situation in front of us, and how can we offer a positive contribution to our common life?

    Drawing on the life and work of the late philosopher Dallas Willard, Michael Wear helps us explore what true spiritual formation could mean for the reformation of our polarized political life:
    “We need to retrieve a sense that we live in a moral universe in which moral decisions are not optional. We make moral decisions all of the time, and our politics is actually not absent of moral assertion. “You could say our politics today is actually more robustly full of moral assertions than it has been at any other time this century.”
    We trust that you’ll be encouraged by Michael’s call to gentleness in our politics and his practical suggestions of Christian practices that help orient our hearts in the midst of cultural confusion and political fractiousness.

    This podcast is an edited version of an online conversation recorded in early 2024. Watch the full video of the conversation here, and learn more about Michael Wear.

    Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:
    The Divine Conspiracy, by Dallas Willard
    Reclaiming Hope, by Michael Wear
    The Spirit of our Politics, by Michael Wear
    Christian Smith
    American Grace, by David Campbell and Robert Putnam
    The Allure of Gentleness, by Dallas Willard
    Eitan Hersh
    The Spirit of the Disciplines, by Dallas Willard
    Related Trinity Forum Readings:
    Abraham Lincoln: The Spiritual Growth of a Public Man
    Letter from Birmingham Jail, by Martin Luther King Jr.
    City of God, by Augustine
    Politics, Morality and Civility, by Václav Havel

    Related Conversations:A New Year With The Word with Malcolm GuiteMusic, Creativity & Justice with Ruth Naomi FloydPursuing Humility with Richard Foster and Brenda QuinnReading as a Spiritual Practice with Jessica Hooten WilsonWalking as a Spiritual Practice with Mark BuchananMaking as a Spiritual Practice with Makoto Fujimura
    To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, join the Trinity Forum Society
    Special thanks to Ned Bustard for our podcast artwork.

    • 33 min
    Making as a Spiritual Practice with Makoto Fujimura

    Making as a Spiritual Practice with Makoto Fujimura

    Making as a Spiritual Practice with Makoto Fujimura
    If at the center of reality is a God whose love is a generative, creative force, how do humans made in God’s image begin to reflect this beauty and love in a world rent by brokenness and ugliness?
    As Mako argues on our latest podcast, it’s in the act of making that we are able to experience the depth of God’s being and grace, and to realize an integral part of our humanity:
    “Love, by definition, is something that goes way outside of utilitarian values and efficiencies and industrial bottom lines. It has to…and when we love, I think we make.  That's just the way we are made, and we respond to that making. So we make, and then when we receive that making, we make again.”Artistry and creativity are not just formative, but even liturgical in that they shape our understanding of, orientation towards, and love for, both the great creator and his creation.

    We hope you’re encouraged in your making this Lenten season that the God who created you in his image delights in your delight.

    If this podcast inspires you, and you’re so inclined, we’d love to see what you create, be that a painting, a meal, a poem, or some other loving, artistic expression. Feel free to share it with us by tagging us on your favorite social platform.

    This podcast is an edited version of an online conversation recorded in 2021. Watch the full video of the conversation here, and learn more about Makoto Fujimura.

    Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:
    Art + Faith: A Theology of Making, by Makoto Fujimura
    William Blake
    Vincent VanGogh
    N. T. Wright
    Esther Meek
    Jaques Pépin
    Bruce Herman
    Martin Luther King Jr.
    The Gift, byLewis Hyde
    Amanda Goldman
    T. S. Eliot
    Calvin Silve
    David Brooks
    Related Trinity Forum Readings:Babette's Feast, by Isak Dinesen
    Four Quartets, by T.S. Eliot
    Pilgrim’s Progress, by John Bunyan
    Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, by Annie Dillard
    God’s Grandeur, by Gerard Manley Hopkins
    Related Conversations:A New Year With The Word with Malcolm GuiteMusic, Creativity & Justice with Ruth Naomi FloydPursuing Humility with Richard Foster and Brenda QuinnReading as a Spiritual Practice with Jessica Hooten WilsonWalking as a Spiritual Practice with Mark Buchanan
    To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, join the Trinity Forum Society
    Special thanks to Ned Bustard for our podcast artwork.

    • 40 min
    Walking as a Spiritual practice with Mark Buchanan

    Walking as a Spiritual practice with Mark Buchanan

    What does it mean to walk with God? The spiritual life is so often described as a walk, journey, or pilgrimage that it can be easy to dismiss the practice of walking as a mere metaphor.
    But in God Walk, author, pastor, and professor Mark Buchanan explores the way that the act of walking has profound implications for followers of the Way.
    Buchanan reflects on the ways in which walking can be both a spiritual practice and a means by which we can deepen our connection to the earth beneath us, our fellow travelers, and the God we worship:
    “Hurry is the enemy of attentiveness. And so love as attentiveness is listening and caring and noticing, cherishing, savoring, being awestruck, these things that we feel in a relationship. I am deeply loved by this person because they notice me. I think that that’s how God’s built it. And we can’t get that if we’re moving too fast, if we’re in a hurry.”We hope you’re encouraged this Lenten season as you learn to walk at godspeed, seeing this embodied act as a profoundly spiritual practice.

    This podcast is an edited version of an online conversation recorded in 2023. Watch the full video of the conversation here, and learn more about Mark Buchanan.
    Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:
    Aristotle
    Søren Kierkegaard
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau
    God Walk, by Mark Buchanan
    Simone WeilThe Three Mile an Hour God, by Kosaku Koyama
    Wanderlust: A History of Walking, by Rebecca Solnit
    Knowing God, J.I. Packer
    Kai Miller
    Related Trinity Forum Readings:Pilgrim’s Progress, by John Bunyan
    Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, by Annie Dillard
    God’s Grandeur, by Gerard Manley Hopkins
    Long Walk to Freedom, by Nelson Mandela
    Brave New World, by Alduous Huxley
    Related Conversations:A New Year With The Word with Malcolm GuiteMusic, Creativity & Justice with Ruth Naomi FloydPursuing Humility with Richard Foster and Brenda QuinnReading as a Spiritual Practice with Jessica Hooten Wilson

    To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, join the Trinity Forum Society.
    Special thanks to Ned Bustard for our podcast artwork.

    • 36 min
    Reading as a Spiritual Practice Jessica Hooten Wilson

    Reading as a Spiritual Practice Jessica Hooten Wilson

    What if we viewed reading as not just a personal hobby or a pleasurable indulgence but as a spiritual practice that deepens our faith?

    In her book, Reading for the Love of God, award-winning author and Trinity Forum Senior Fellow Jessica Hooten Wilson explores how Christian thinkers—including Augustine, Julian of Norwich, Frederick Douglass, and Dorothy Sayers—approached the act of reading.
    She argues that reading deeply and well can not only open a portal to a broader imagination, but is akin to acquiring travel supplies for the good life:
    “What I'm hoping to see more of is that the church becomes again those people of the book that really try to make others belong and strive for a deeper connection, versus the party atmosphere that our world always is tempting us to do.”
    We hope you’re encouraged this Lenten season as you learn to read as a spiritual practice, finding grace and wisdom for living well along the way.

    This podcast is an edited version of an online conversation recorded in 2023. Watch the full video of the conversation here, and learn more about Jessica Hooten Wilson.

    Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:
    Learning the Good Life: Wisdom from the Great Hearts and Minds That Came Before, by Jessica Hooten Wilson
    Giving the Devil His Due, by Jessica Hooten Wilson
    The Scandal of Holiness: Renewing Your Imagination in the Company of Literary Saints, by Jessica Hooten Wilson
    Reading for the Love of God: How to Read as a Spiritual Practice,, by Jessica Hooten Wilson
    Walker Percy
    The Life you Save May Be Your Own, by Flannery O'Connor
    Fyodor Dostoevsky
    Boethius
    Augustine
    Mystery and Manners, by Flannery O’Connor
    St. Basil
    Origen
    People of the Book, by David L. Jeffrey
    A History of Reading, by Alberto Manguel
    Jerome
    Andy Crouch
    Dana Gioia
    Dorothy Sayers
    Ross Douthat
    Life Together, by Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    Julian of Norwich
    Dante Alighieri
    Eugene Peterson
    Related Trinity Forum Readings:
    Revelation, Flannery O'Connor
    The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
    Augustine's Confessions
    The Grand Inquisitor, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    Moses Man of the Mountain, by Zora Neale Hurston
    God's Grandeur: the Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins
    Related Conversations:A New Year With The Word with Malcolm GuiteMusic, Creativity & Justice with Ruth Naomi FloydPursuing Humility with Richard Foster and Brenda Quinn
    To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, join the Trinity Forum Society
    Special thanks to Ned Bustard for our podcast artwork.

    • 28 min
    Pursuing Humility, with Richard Foster and Brenda Quinn

    Pursuing Humility, with Richard Foster and Brenda Quinn

    Pursuing Humility, with Richard Foster and Brenda Quinn
    In an age when self-promotion is often celebrated as a sign of leadership and strength, humility may seem a lost virtue. Or alternatively, a form of moral condolence for the less successful.
    In his recent work, Learning Humility, theologian Richard Foster argues that humility is actually strength, and that learning humility is more needed than ever. As Foster explains, humility releases us from a preoccupation with self, and allows us to live a life of freedom:

    “One of the dangers among religious folks is that they can become stuffy boars. And it is hilarity that frees us from that. We don't take ourselves so seriously. We can laugh at our own foibles. If you look carefully… it's not hard to identify humble people. You'll find the freedom that they have to just enjoy life and enjoy other people, enjoy the successes of another person rather than being envious of it. Things like that. And so that's why humility, the most basic of the virtues, opens us up to a life of freedom.”
    May Foster’s call to humility, and pastor and writer Brenda Quinn’s practical insights on living it out in leadership and community, inspire you this Lenten season to contemplate the humility of Jesus and the way of the cross.
    This podcast is an edited version of an online conversation recorded in 2022. Watch the full video of the conversation here, and learn more about Richard Foster and Brenda Quinn.

    Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:
    Learning Humility, by Richard Foster
    Celebration of Discipline, by Richard Foster
    Streams of Living Water, by Richard Foster
    Sanctuary of the Soul, by Richard Foster
    The Life With God Bible, contributed to by Richard FosterC.S. Lewis
    Timothy Keller
    The Frenzy of Renown
    Related Trinity Forum Readings:
    The Long Loneliness, by Dorothy Day
    Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
    Who stands Fast, featuring Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    Babette's Feast, by Isak Dinesen
    Wrestling with God, by Simone Weil 
    Related Conversations:A New Year With The Word with Malcolm GuiteMusic, Creativity & Justice with Ruth Naomi Floyd
    To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, join the Trinity Forum Society
    Special thanks to Ned Bustard for our podcast artwork.

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
142 Ratings

142 Ratings

DrJJS ,

Marvelous

I love the voices on the Trinity form. Some familiar. Some expanding my horizons. All enlarging my heart.

No Nickname - they're all take ,

Trinity Forum is Christianity at its best

Trinity Forum sustains my Christian engagement. With regular speakers who are engaged in Christian ministry that affects the larger national and global concerns we as Christian share, I find Trinity Forum to be my favorite place to engage in deep thought with Christian thinkers. I’m so very grateful for the work of this team.

Pyramus0839 ,

Thoughtful discussions

I really appreciate the Trinity Forum podcasts - often, they bring in speakers who are asking questions and sharing thoughts that are just on the tip of my tongue. It’s such a valuable resource to try and think Christianly about our current moment. Highly recommend!

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