79 episodes

The Velocity of Content podcast is produced by CCC, the global leader in content workflow and rights integration with 40+ years of experience providing solutions and copyright education for businesses and publishers.



Featuring breaking news and thoughtful analysis from across the dynamic global content industry, CCC’s Velocity of Content is a platform for thought leaders and industry experts operating at the speed of content to share new ideas, observations, and knowledge and stay on top of emerging industry trends and challenges.

Velocity of Content Velocity of Content

    • Arts
    • 4.4 • 18 Ratings

The Velocity of Content podcast is produced by CCC, the global leader in content workflow and rights integration with 40+ years of experience providing solutions and copyright education for businesses and publishers.



Featuring breaking news and thoughtful analysis from across the dynamic global content industry, CCC’s Velocity of Content is a platform for thought leaders and industry experts operating at the speed of content to share new ideas, observations, and knowledge and stay on top of emerging industry trends and challenges.

    ALA Conference Draws 14K Attendance

    ALA Conference Draws 14K Attendance

    In Washington DC, the annual conference of the American Library Association – the first such in-person ALA event in three years – concluded on Tuesday.



    According to Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer, ALA officials reported 13,990 total registrations, with 8,023 attendees, mostly librarians, and 5,133 exhibitors, including publishers and technology vendors.



    ALA’s previous in-person annual conference, in 2019, was also held in Washington D.C., and attracted 21,460 total attendees. The 2018 conference in New Orleans drew 17,599.



    “Getting 13,990 attendees to come to Washington after a pandemic – in a pandemic? –

    exceeded the organizer’s expectations,” Albanese tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.



    “Librarians arrived in Washington amid a host of significant political and cultural issues that were reflected in a great, wide-ranging professional program,” he adds. “The show floor was quite busy, with long lines for book signings by authors, vendor demos, and galley pickups.”

    • 14 min
    A Textbook Life, By An Author

    A Textbook Life, By An Author

    When Dr. Laura Berk began writing her first textbook on child development, her work followed her home from the classroom at Illinois State University. There was research and writing to do, of course, and there were her own children to care for and learn from. At the time, the early-career professor had two young sons, then ages 8 and 11.



    In May, SAGE Publishing’s US college division announced a new author/publisher partnership with Dr. Berk, distinguished professor emerita in the department of psychology at Illinois State University. SAGE now becomes the exclusive publisher of Berk’s bestselling titles. Together, the textbooks are considered an essential resource on human development from infancy to adolescence and into adulthood.



    Over the same period that Dr. Berk has researched and written her body of work, not only publishing and related technology have changed dramatically but also society and culture.



    “The US, I think, is undergoing unprecedented change in ethnic/cultural diversity. It’s vital that we authors represent that on virtually almost every page of our text. It’s also important that we represent it in illustrations for students,” she tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.



    “I think students are expecting to find discussions in the text they can relate to. They want to see themselves and their own cultural and ethnic backgrounds in the text. And they want to see images that look like themselves. They should expect that, and we have a responsibility to deliver on that,” Dr. Berk continues.



    “With respect to LGBTQ+ subject, I included in my titles early on evidence on development of kids in lesbian and gay families, of development of gender minority children, on lesbian and gay parents and child-rearing, and on lesbian and gay adults. As the research appeared, I felt a strong responsibility to include it. More recently, we have an increasing body of research on transgender children, and I have included that in the last couple of editions of my texts,” she explains.



    “So it’s a high priority for me, and I plan to pay serious attention to diversity, equity, and inclusion of all kinds. We can’t really understand development without doing that.”

    • 16 min
    ALA Annual Conference Returns to Washington

    ALA Annual Conference Returns to Washington

    This weekend in Washington, DC, the American Library Association holds its first in-person annual conference since the COVID-19 pandemic began in early 2020.



    The 2019 ALA conference, also in Washington, drew 21,000 attendees, according to Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer. How well the same show performs in 2022 will be an important metric for the oldest and largest library association in the world, with more than 57,000 members, he says.



    “There is no question that the pandemic took a toll on the library community and library workers,” Albanese notes. “At this point, the profession needs some time and space to heal and to consider the future of working conditions for librarians and library workers.”



    In addition to attendance figures, Albanese will also have his eye on exhibitors, especially those representing leading publishing houses. Industry observers have recently speculated that ALA shows might compensate for the disappearance of BookExpo.



    “I’ll be watching closely to see how the major publishers respond – if they are back, if they have their big booths, and how many author signings there are,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.

    • 16 min
    Cryptocurrency and Cryptic Copyright

    Cryptocurrency and Cryptic Copyright

    With their indifferent, detached expressions, the 10,000 members of the Bored Ape Yacht Club look, well, bored. But there is great excitement in the billion-dollar market for these digital images, which were launched in April 2021 and count singers Justin Bieber and Madonna among their celebrity owners.



    When actor Seth Green paid $200,000 to purchase Bored Ape NFT #8398 – a.k.a., Fred Simian –the deal included licensing rights, and Green created a television show to feature Fred. Then just weeks ago, Fred went missing.



    In the past week, Green revealed that Fred Simian is home, yet the strange, twisted tale of a Bored Ape has many more turns left, involving copyright law, cryptocurrency, and blockchain code.



    To unravel this virtual riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma, Paul Sweeting, editor of rightstech.com and co-chair of the RightsTech Summit (returning online in September) spoke with CCC’s Chris Kenneally.



    “The purported license of usage rights was conveyed by means of a blockchain smart contract, and the terms and conditions say that your ownership of this ape and these rights that we are extending to you is entirely mediated by a smart contract on the Ethereum blockchain,” Sweeting explains.



    “Well, a smart contract isn’t really a contract – a smart contract is simply a bit of self-executing code. It’s not the equivalent of a contract of sale or a license contract that is written down by lawyers and signed by both parties and notarized,” he says. “So when you purchase a Bored Ape, and it purports to convey you these rights, it’s not at all clear that a smart contract can do that in a legal sense that the courts would recognize.”

    • 17 min
    No New BookExpo Coming

    No New BookExpo Coming

    Publishers Weekly reports there is little appetite in the US publishing community for a large-scale annual trade show along the lines of BookExpo, which folded in 2020 after many years at the Javits Center in New York City.



    “The overwhelming response from the big houses was that they have no desire to go back to the Javits Center, with its big booths and the costs in time and resources that entails,” says Andrew Albanese, PW senior writer. “Smaller publishers as well as indies and authors are more interested in returning to such a show, but they can’t afford it either.”



    Without an annual trade show, however, the publishing industry risks undermining any sense of professional community, according to Albanese.



    “Trade shows serve a purpose—they bring people together and highlight the work of an industry,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “For a week a year, we get headlines, and we see our peers face to face. That sense of community matters, especially when an industry is facing challenges the way publishing is.”

    • 16 min
    Podcasting Comes to Hollywood

    Podcasting Comes to Hollywood

    Podcasting is big business. Last year, podcast advertising exceeded $1 billion for the first time. By 2024, ad spend is expected to grow to $4 billion annually. Major streaming and traditional media companies have already invested over $2 billion in podcasting deals, raising comparisons with the heady early days of television.



    The digital gold rush has many podcasters giddy with dreams of making it big in Hollywood. But as book authors have discovered over a century of adaptations, the appetite for content in La-La Land is voracious, leading to business terms that require absolute control of intellectual property.



    Attorney Alexia Bedat represents podcasters in IP negotiations with producers and media companies. She advises her clients to learn the lessons of Hollywood contracts and to seek deals that build on the unique strengths of podcasting.



    For example, podcasters can leverage the role of the platform, such as Apple and Spotify, which is different from television and allows.



    “If you look at film/TV, traditionally there are multiple entities or players that are involved before a piece of content makes it out into the world. From the moment there’s an idea to when the consumer watches the content, it’s gone through deals with talent, it’s gone through deals with the studio, it’s gone through deals between the studio and the network, it’s gone through deals between the network and the distributor, with the streamer,” Bedat tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.



    “If you contrast this to the podcast industry, with RSS feed wide distribution, the host or the podcast production company can literally themselves, through dropping the content in the feed, make the content available to the end user without any assignment of rights that’s needed,” she explains. “You might need to abide by the platform’s policies, but you don’t need to assign any rights. You don’t need to lose part of your IP to anyone.”

    • 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

MissPoot ,

Here for Andrew Albanese, not lobbyists covering up abusive practices

Velocity of Content’s Friday episodes with Andrew Albanese are fascinating and a must-listen for me, human, grounded, hopeful, and realistic. But then when they’re done it seems like half the time there is some lobbyist interview next, like the most recent “diversity” episode in which the guest talks about invasive data collection and elearning companies— two of the worst perpetuators of systemic racism and the erosion of an educated public— as if they are the gold standard in DEI. Yuck. I will be careful not to listen to anything but the Friday episodes in the future. Enjoy, but take with a spoonful of salt!

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