80 episodes

The Velocity of Content podcast is produced by CCC, the global leader in content workflow and rights integration with 40+ years of experience providing solutions and copyright education for businesses and publishers.



Featuring breaking news and thoughtful analysis from across the dynamic global content industry, CCC’s Velocity of Content is a platform for thought leaders and industry experts operating at the speed of content to share new ideas, observations, and knowledge and stay on top of emerging industry trends and challenges.

Velocity of Content Velocity of Content

    • Arts
    • 4.4 • 16 Ratings

The Velocity of Content podcast is produced by CCC, the global leader in content workflow and rights integration with 40+ years of experience providing solutions and copyright education for businesses and publishers.



Featuring breaking news and thoughtful analysis from across the dynamic global content industry, CCC’s Velocity of Content is a platform for thought leaders and industry experts operating at the speed of content to share new ideas, observations, and knowledge and stay on top of emerging industry trends and challenges.

    This Audiobook Was Narrated By No One

    This Audiobook Was Narrated By No One

    High-level text-to-speech technology (TTS) has made it possible for Siri and Alexa to answer questions and follow commands for a decade. Now, the latest in TTS may mean TTFN – ta-ta for now! – for traditionally-produced audiobooks.



    Audiobooks are an increasingly important piece of the revenue pie for publishers. In 2020, audiobook sales topped $1.3 billion, a 12% jump over 2019. With few exceptions, human narrators – authors themselves as well as actors and other artists – are heard in such recordings.



    AI-enabled automated audiobook creation, however, lies just beyond the horizon, says electronic publishing analyst Thad McIlroy. The shift from analog to digital voices, he reports, would lower production costs and lead to greater choice in titles, as well as mean a lot less work for Hollywood actors between pictures.



    “For certain books, it is simply not economical to bring in talent at a high price level, to go into the studio, and to have sophisticated production values,” McIlroy says. “So the choice becomes an either/or. It’s a binary choice. Are we going to get an audiobook for a backlist title or not? Because if we have to go through traditional production methods, it’s simply not going to be financially possible.”



    What stands in the way of the machines, though, is a contractual requirement of the leading self-publishing audiobook platform, ACX, part of Amazon’s Audible service. “Your submitted audiobook must be narrated by a human,” according to the submission requirements. “TTS recordings are not allowed.”



    “That’s a big hurdle, and all the [TTS] vendors recognize it. That hurdle will likely go away as soon as Amazon makes a larger commitment itself into using this automated technology,” McIlroy tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “Every expert that I spoke to felt that Amazon’s going to come along and endorse it 12 months, 24 months from now. But in the meantime, vendors are stuck using alternate distribution channels."

    • 12 min
    Will Romance Readers Fall For Subscriptions?

    Will Romance Readers Fall For Subscriptions?

    The launch this week of Harlequin Plus moves the world’s largest romance publisher beyond books into the broader "content" category, says Andrew Albanese, Publishers Weekly senior writer.



    Choosing monthly from “book bundles” across the publisher’s nine imprints, customers of the new multimedia subscription service will receive either e-books or physical copies delivered to their homes. Harlequin Plus themed book bundles for February include the Romantic Comedy Collection; the Sweet Magnolias Starter Pack; Romance by Black Authors; Amish Romance; and LGBTQ+ Romance.



    “The service will be available through both the Harlequin Plus website and app, which is critical. When you have an app, you have a customer, and you have customer data. You have a relationship you don’t have when you sell a print book,” Albanese tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.



    “It makes perfect sense that Harlequin is the first major publisher in the US to develop a subscription offering,” says Albanese. “Romance readers are voracious and have long been comfortable with digital because digital can keep up with their considerable reading pace.”

    • 17 min
    Sharing Muslim American Stories

    Sharing Muslim American Stories

    Hosted by Shahjehan Khan, the King of the World podcast recounts his journey through addiction, identity, creativity, and what it means to belong as a Muslim in America in the 20 years after 9/11. An actor and musician, Shahjehan Khan explores with sound and voices the challenges that can be part of the American Muslim experience.



    In December, King of the World won the 2021 Golden Crane Award for Best Production from the Asian American Podcasters Association. The show is produced by Rifelion Media, based in Portland, Oregon; Rifelion was founded in 2020 to elevate diverse voices, explains Asad Butt, company founder and producer.



    “For us, that means people and stories that aren’t being told in mainstream media. we’re starting with stories from the American Muslim community because that’s where my background is,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.



    “When I was growing up in Boston – a child of the ’80s – there were few if any American Muslims on TV, radio, or in movies. And if there were, they tended to be very negative portrayals – terrorists, villains, swarthy characters.



    “There were a couple other Muslim families that were in my town and one or two other Muslim students in my grade, so there was some solidarity there. But I was still definitely an outsider,” said Butt.



    “Rifelion is trying to share stories like mine, like Shahjehan Khan’s and others who have had similar experiences.”

    • 15 min
    Publishers Further Delay Office Return

    Publishers Further Delay Office Return

    In a New Year’s message, Hachette Book Group CEO Michael Pietsch has called 2021, “a very successful year," while also noting supply chain disruptions and return-to-office uncertainties.



    According to Publishers Weekly, Pietsch said the pandemic, “has derailed our plan to return to our offices early in [2022] … Planning for that return requires a tremendous amount of work, especially with such a continually evolving situation, and I am deeply grateful to the teams handling that complex process.”



    As 2021 closed, trade book sales maintained robust levels seen throughout the COVID-19, notes Andrew Albanese, PW senior writer. Nevertheless, the Omicron variant has crushed hopes that staff might return soon to offices in New York City and elsewhere.



    “As 2022 opens, the major publishers here in NY have delayed plans to come back to the office,” Albanese tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “In the summer and early fall, life was starting to feel a little normal again. We talked about returning the office and to in-person book fairs. Now, that’s all on hold.”

    • 17 min
    Gen Z Explained

    Gen Z Explained

    If you remember life before YouTube and Facebook, then you are not a member of Generation Z. Born in the mid-1990s, along with Netscape and other early graphical web browsers, members of Generation Z comprise the first generation never to live without the internet. They expect to inherit from previous generations an onerous legacy – a world in crisis over climate change, inequity, and social revolution.



    Roberta Katz coauthor of Gen Z, Explained: The Art of Living in a Digital Age, recently out from the University of Chicago Press. She is a senior research scholar at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, an interdisciplinary research lab at Stanford University.



    While most takes on Gen Z are unforgivingly judgmental, describing lives permanently distracted by social media, Katz and her colleagues in anthropology, linguistics, history, and sociology offer a richer, more optimistic view of a confident, collaborative cohort.



    “The digital revolution has come on with unprecedented speed. It has presented us with unprecedented scope and scale of information. And most importantly, it has kind of given a rocket boost to how we communicate,” she tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally.



    According to her team’s findings, Gen Zers says relevance in communication are critical to them.



    “They’ve grown up with such an abundance of information, they had to get good at sorting what they needed from what they didn’t. It’s not always an absolute good to be dismissive of something that you don’t think is relevant. But it comes from having learned how to deal with an abundance of information.



    “The internet is all about communication,” Katz explains. “And if you think about the importance of communication to human life and the fact that we have this extraordinarily powerful new tool, you begin to understand why this revolution has us all kind of with our heads spinning.”

    • 15 min
    The Art of Connecting: Comic Books to Music Catalogs

    The Art of Connecting: Comic Books to Music Catalogs

    In the final weeks of 2021, Velocity of Content is looking back at the past twelve months of programs.



    Here at CCC, we have a long track record as an early adopter of digital technology.



    Our company’s domain name copyright.com went online in 1995 when dial-up connections and Netscape were Web standards.



    In December 2005, the New Oxford American Dictionary named podcast the 2005 word of the year, and CCC launched this very program shortly afterward.



    In January this year, the CCC podcast known for 15 years as Beyond the Book became Velocity of Content. What didn’t change was our focus on breaking news and thoughtful analysis from across the dynamic global content industry.



    “Communication in digital media requires agility from both the creator and the audience,” notes podcast host Christopher Kenneally. “Each side moves readily across a spectrum of forms. Reaching the intended audience matters more than any chosen medium, whether you are an individual Instagram influencer or a global organization.”

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

MissPoot ,

Here for Andrew Albanese, not lobbyists covering up abusive practices

Velocity of Content’s Friday episodes with Andrew Albanese are fascinating and a must-listen for me, human, grounded, hopeful, and realistic. But then when they’re done it seems like half the time there is some lobbyist interview next, like the most recent “diversity” episode in which the guest talks about invasive data collection and elearning companies— two of the worst perpetuators of systemic racism and the erosion of an educated public— as if they are the gold standard in DEI. Yuck. I will be careful not to listen to anything but the Friday episodes in the future. Enjoy, but take with a spoonful of salt!

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